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Campaigns

72andSunny Dives Deep into the Brew for Starbucks

The biggest name in coffee didn’t need to go with hashtags or cross-brand promotions today: it had an interactive mini-documentary by 72andSunny up its over-caffeinated sleeve.

The purpose of the spot is to recast Starbucks as a sort of offline social networking platform by visiting locations around the world and observing the people who frequent them.

It’s compelling.

It’s also very similar, conceptually, to the 2010 film Life in a Day: all filmed in different spots around the world during a single 24-hour period.

Shorter spots and credits below.

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Erwin Penland Introduces Alaska to Verizon


Erwin Penland teamed up with production company Harpoon Picures for a visually striking tribute to Alaska, celebrating the network’s arrival in the 49th state.

The well-shot 30-second spot highlights some of the state’s natural beauty before concluding with the Verizon team showing up and saying, “We’re here Alaska.” The ad celebrates the fact that Verizon’s expansion into the territory has made the company Alaska’s largest and fastest 4G LTE network. Harpoon was able to assemble a team and put the spot together over the course of just several days.

“A project like this reminds us that it takes more than a great director to produce a great spot,” said Chris Miller, Harpoon’s director of new business development.”Harpoon put all our best problem solving skills to the test and our amazing production team deftly pulled off every challenge presented to them in an incredibly short amount of time.” Read more

Ogilvy, David Team Up for Spotify


Ogilvy & Mather New York teamed up with Miami sister shop David in a new campaign for Spotify entitled “#thatsongwhen.”

The campaign is built around the emotional impact of music and how songs become linked to certain life events and then trigger certain memories every time you heard them. In “Waterfalls,” for example, a man talks about TLC’s 90s hit and how he will always associate it with an unrequited crush from middle school whom he taped the song for. It’s a cute story, and one which many viewers will be able to relate to on some level, even if (like a lot of Spotify users) they have never actually used a cassette player.

Other spots in the campaign include a man walking out on a job he was just fired from to Whitesnake and a soundtrack to some good old-fashioned teen vandalism. Vine celebrities Vincent Marcus and Kenzie Nimmo get in on the action as well, through a campaign component on that platform. It’s a fun approach which makes a lot of sense for Spotify, and the campaign also includes a social extension via a hashtag people may actually feel compelled to use, (#thatsongwhen) since it offers a way for people to tell their own stories. The campaign just rolled out in the US and will expand to the UK and Germany, featuring localized content for each market.

“The realness of this campaign is the key point,” Adam Tucker, Ogilvy New York president, told Adweek. “We wanted to tap into the truth about music and it was really important to tap into real people and their feelings and the songs that inspire them.” Read more

The Richards Group Goes Minimalist for Prestone

The Richards Group’s latest campaign clearly operates under the “less is more” mantra, with a series of minimalist 15-second ads.

The campaign leans heavily on the brand’s product itself, without any bells and whistles. In “Beastly” for example, the visuals are restricted to a bottle of Prestone with an effect to make it look bulked up at one point as the voiceover says, “It’s like Prestone started working out, got buff…beasty.” Another spot, “Patented,” touts the company’s patented cor-guard inhibitors, asking who else has them before answering its own question with “Nobody…because they’re patented,” while displaying the actual patent numbers.

It’s an unusually restrained approach that emphasizes the product’s superior corrosion protection in a way that implies there’s no need for further discussion. By keeping the message simple and not dressing it up with storytelling or impressive visuals, The Richards Group hopes to lend that message a sense of authenticity. Read more

adam&eveDDB See ‘Gliding Lights’ for Sony

The latest spot advertising Sony’s newest smartphone goes well beyond your standard product demo.

The ad, created by adam&eveDDB as part of the brand’s “demand great” campaign, shows us an (almost certainly exaggerated) sequence starring several well-lit skiiers and the best cover of Kavinsky’s “Night Call” to date:

The spot looks like an attempt to position the phone itself — which has not been released yet in the U.S. and will probably make its first appearance stateside in October a mere six-plus months after its predecessor’s debut — as a superior alternative to better-known competitors.

We’re not sure about all that, but the visuals are impressive.

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mcgarrybowen Celebrates ‘Mr. Amazing’ for Verizon

mcgarrybowen launched a spot for Verzion, entitled “Mr. Amazing,” which celebrates the company’s XLTE service and football season.

In the spot, some rather fantastical football leads into a man screaming “Yeah” at a field day type event, accompanied by the voiceover, “Don’t just dream about being the hero, make it happen.” The man, it is revealed, is streaming a football game at his daughter’s event, much to the relief of another father present. “So be that guy,” Verizon implores at the end of the spot, “with Verizon XLTE.” It’s a bit of an odd sendoff, as the phrasing of “that guy’ the way they use it usually has a negative connotation. It’s almost as if they can’t decide whether they want to make fun of the protagonist (who screams “Yeah!” after the initial fantasy segment) or celebrate him as “Mr. Amazing” and instead the spot attempts to do both. Read more

Grey London Unveils ‘The Swell’ for Volvo

Grey London has launched its first global campaign for Volvo since winning creative duties last December, which takes a different approach to automobile advertising.

In the 60-second “The Swell,” the first shot is from the passenger side perspective. As the camera zooms out (while panning around the car) we see that the door is open and the car is parked at a deserted beach. “To feel, to really feel, is a rare thing these days,” intones the voiceover as we see the car’s driver (presumably) riding a surfboard and taking in the surroundings. As the camera submerges into the water, we see the tagline, “Seek feeling.”

The unusual spot breaks today on Volvo’s YouTube account and website, and will broadcast in Germany, Australia, France, Turkey and Belgium at the end of this year, and the UK in 2015.

“The last thing the world needs is another overly-retouched car, hooning down a mountain road to a soft rock soundtrack,” Hollie Newton, Grey London’s global creative director told Campaign. “There’s a defiant, slightly renegade Swedish spirit to Volvo that simply doesn’t fit with the bland world of car advertising. And thank God for that.”

DDB Does Mom/Dad Humor for Breyers

As if we needed further proof that 90′s-style R&B is history’s most resilient genre (even when performed by painfully white people), here’s a little skit created by DDB to position client Breyers’ gelato as the kind of naughty treat that mature adults indulge in when the kids aren’t watching.

In order to remind everyone how silly the idea of gelato as a vice really is, the copywriters made sure to point out the inanity of the sad pleasures that parents (apparently) allow themselves to enjoy: HBO and a frozen dessert that contains about 35 percent of the fat of, you know, the real stuff.

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Arnold Worldwide, Ad Council Launch ‘Grads of Life’ PSA

Arnold Worldwide and the Ad Council teamed up with Year Up, the Employment Pathways Project, ConPRmetidos, MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership, New Options Project, and Opportunity Nation for a PSA campaign entitled “Grads of Life.”

The campaign promotes alternative hiring processes and attempts to “raise awareness and change employer’s perceptions of opportunity youth” to fill the 4 million vacant positions companies in the U.S. are trying to fill. In a spot called “Pathways to Employment,” running in both 30 and 60-second versions, an employer sits down with a candidate for an interview. She touts her problem solving skills and strong work ethic, and, while he mentions her lack of a college degree, he ultimately decides she’s exactly what he’s looking for. Then, she disappears into thin air, symbolizing that because of the way in which they look for candidates, most employers never meet these type of prospective employees.

The campaign launch was backed by Hilary Clinton at the tenth annual meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative, where she said, “The Grads of Life PSA campaign is the first effort to drive employer demand for the millions of low-income young adults that are a huge source of untapped talent in our country and through GradsofLife.org employers can now access the first-ever online platform for the information, tools, and resources they need to take action today.”

Nike Does It Their Way in the Philippines

Because it’s a Friday and the usual flow of campaign pitches has slowed to a barely-discernible dribble, here’s one we found on Twitter supposedly created by BBH Singapore to promote Nike in the Philippines.

Things we liked about this ad:

  • Unusual cover of “My Way”
  • Wide variety of settings
  • Pseudo-Jordan shot at the end
  • The fact that some of these kids aren’t even wearing shoes, much less Nikes

With all due respect to The Captain and TBWA, we were also excited to see something about sports that didn’t involve Derek Jeter, Bill Simmons or Richard Sherman.

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