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I Have Twatted

Cheerios Moms, Station Wagon Moms Unite with Brand’s ‘Project Drive-In’ Donation

HondaCheerios

We reported earlier on Honda’s “Day of Reckoning” for the Odyssey: a Twitter campaign engaging snack brands in dialogue over the Odyssey’s built-in vacuum cleaner.

Cheerios tweeted Honda in response, and donated $1,933 to Honda’s ‘Project Drive-In Fund‘ (which we’ve also covered; it would appear I’ve become the “Honda guy” around here, which is fine — I drive an Insight) to commemorate the birth year of the drive in. Honda has to feel pretty ecstatic about that move, as it ties together two of its campaigns and engages an outside audience. The two brands are a pretty perfect match, too. There must be a big overlap between station wagon moms and Cheerios moms.

Honda: feel free to send me free stuff. Cheerios: only if it’s frosted.

Here’s a Social Media Campaign for Fruitwater Starring Murder Suspect Christina Applegate

Glaceau has a new product, fruitwater, that is most likely 0-calorie sparkling fruit-flavored water. I can’t tell from this spot, but that’s my guess. Sounds like just the thing a rich  woman would use to cut her vodka, doesn’t it? It’s great that there’s definitely a customer base for this new product.

To push fruitwater onto said rich women is one of their own, Christina Applegate, best known for playing Kelly Bundy on Married… with Children and jumping ship before her NBC show, Up All Night, was canceled. According to Wikipedia, her mom also used to have a thing with Stephen Stills, so that’s something.

In order to grow fruitwater’s 4,000 or so Twitter followers to a substantial enough number to convince some brand reps that their social media is “working,” consumers are being encouraged to confess crimes and say mean things via the #sparklingtruth hashtag for a campaign from L.A.-based agency Zambezi. If your truth is good enough, fruitwater will give you a personal assistant for a week. But, of course, the only way you could know that is if you start following the account or, like me, you were sent a press release describing the contest. You gotta work for information on the incentive, you know? Credits after the jump.

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What the Hell is ‘The Listening Cloud?’ Let’s Let RPA Explain

Hmm, do you really want to be listening this much? Well, if so, here’s RPA’s latest project, which according to the parties involved, is “a fluffy data-driven light sculpture that visualizes social media conversation in real-time.”  According to a statement from RPA CD Perrin Anderson, “We wanted to build something that could show what’s happening in the social media ‘cloud’ in real-time, not as data or a visualization on a screen, but as a fun, sensory, physical thing. We hope that others will share their ideas on the marriage of creativity and data by using the hashtag #ListeningCloud on their social accounts.”

If you happen to stroll by RPA’s Santa Monica digs–which cater to the likes of Honda and Farmers Insurance–and love lights, colors, etc., “Listening Cloud” is there for the picking, featuring real-time data from Facebook, Twitter and Instagram public APIs. According to the parties involved, you the agency’s client will be in the mix as, via wireless bridge to LEDs, will track hashtags, likes or comments about a client, with cloud “storming” via multi-colored lightning that corresponds to the different social media channels.  To be honest, this cloud shit is still new (yeah we know, blah blah) and we’ll absorb it when we can, but an interesting peek into agency and old client moving forward.  Check out making-of clip after the jump.

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Let’s Talk Ad Math, Vol. 1

This column has been pinballing around my head for the past few months. I’m curious about hashtags. I’m under the impression that although everyone knows what a hashtag looks like, not many people pay attention to Twitter statistics beyond Follower counts. And now that every commercial – online or televised – comes with a hashtag, many of which seem perfunctory, I want to make an inexact science a bit more exact by evaluating basic Internet data and applying it to our coverage for the previous week.

Twitter clearly has value. Celebrities of varying degrees get paid silly amounts of money for sponsored tweets (sidebar: did you know that Melissa Joan Hart makes $9,100 for some of her tweets? That’s more obnoxious than silly). With money and brand equity to be had in the Twitter economy, every company can now slap a hashtag onto a visual ad and pretend to know what it’s doing. Remember when Newsweek ran with #MuslimRage? Or McDonald’s unintentionally eviscerating itself with #McDStories? Twitter can be tricky for the lazy and oblivious.

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Person in Charge of Delta’s Twitter Apparently a Sir Mix-a-Lot Fan

We’ve certainly seen worse Twitter offenses over the years when it comes brands, like this one from two years ago. So, let’s just be like the kids these days and let out a loud SMH at what whoever handles Delta’s Twitter account just posted and already has several commenters and tipsters expressing everything from eyerolls to WTFs. Consider this a little mid-afternoon respite from all the agency-related madness of the week. The only good thing that can come out of this is that the self-proclaimed “Mack Daddy” is collecting a damn check somewhere.

Honda Test-Drives Social Media Sharing with #WantNewCar

Do you hate your car? Do you want to let the world know how frustrated you are driving around in a jalopy that is beyond repair? Honda can help – sort of. For the rest of today, Honda will be tweeting back Vine videos at unhappy drivers who post #WantNewCar on Twitter. The Twitter/Vine combo, developed by the automaker’s longtime agency RPA, is part of Honda’s Summer Clearance Sales Event, and is meant to provide some catharsis to drivers even though there aren’t any discounts or financial incentives for using the hashtag. There probably should be.

If you watch the promo clip above, you’ll see what it looks like when brands use social media for the sake of using social media rather than really committing to interacting with consumers on various social platforms.Take KFC and their annoying, yet memorable, #IAteTheBones campaign. It’s made to go viral and is primarily identifiable to KFC and no other brand. On Twitter, KFC offers followers free merchandise and deals related to the hashtag on a regular basis. Honda is only responding for one day. Even though Honda’s hashtag is much more relatable (one could argue it’s too generic) the execution feels unsure of itself, just like a teenage driver getting behind the wheel for the first time. Credits after the jump.

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Art & Science Says Go Fish with Wireless Bass That Talks Through Tweets

If you’re worked up over Sharknado, you might also appreciate a smaller fish to fry: digital agency Art & Science have produced a Twitter-activated talking fish, à la Big Mouth Billy Bass the singing sensation. When people tweet to the @fishyourself account, the rubber fish on the wall of the Art & Science office turns its head and speaks whatever wise words were written, wirelessly.

The idea came about due to Art & Science’s “Awesome Idea of the Day” board, where employees are encouraged to post their serious or wackiest potential projects. Every once in awhile the agency hosts a hackathon, in which one or two of the ideas are produced.

It’s cute, and of course any expression of technological creativity is a helpful learning experience. But I wonder if the time spent engineering a talking fish could have been better used to educate an eager student on the ins-and-outs of an agency, or somehow using talent and resources to aid a charitable cause. Am I missing the point?

Wendy’s Sings the Tweets of Those Willing to Compliment Their Food

While we’ve seem almost every iteration of brands turning fans’ tweets into ads by this point, here’s a new spot for Wendy’s new Pretzel Bacon Cheeseburger from agency VML that adds a musical component to this formula.

Using that hashtag #PretzelLoveSongs on Twitter AND Facebook (gah, Facebook has hashtags now), consumers who say exceedingly positive things about Wendy’s new burger had the opportunity for their praises to be turned into a musical number, with some having even been sung by former 98° frontman/Jessica Simpson spouse Nick Lachey during a live event last night in New York, where live-streams always take place for some reason. While the press release doesn’t say if the specific location was Times Square, we’re going to go ahead and guess this happened in Times Square.

Nothing like watching a former boy band member/reality star sing about a cheeseburger in probably Times Square. Oh, and VML offered the chance to participate via your social media, because the most effective use of it is to either praise or make fun of brands who spend a lot of money on advertising. If we’re lucky, it might even be a trending tweet. Update: The event actually took place at a Wendy’s location, natch, on 34th St in NYC.

Snapple Vines Some ‘Re-enFACTments’

Many top brands have preferred Instagram to Vine when deciding how to complement branding with viral videos, but that hasn’t stopped Snapple, with creative direction from NYC-based Code and Theory, from choosing six over 15. As part of Snapple’s Re-enFACTments digital campaign, here’s a little stop-motion animation to kick off the weekend. The above clip was designed by Khoa Phan, who Mashable declared “Vine’s Most Creative Stop-Motion Animator.”

Snapple and Code and Theory have reached out to a number of unique people on the platform to visualize the signature series of under-the-cap facts that lost their novelty appeal about ten years ago. Phan worked with fact #754 – an alligator can go through 3,000 teeth in a lifetime, a ridiculous number that probably excites dentists and orthodontists around the world. And, as you can see in a few additional Vines below, makes eating an apple more troubling than you’d expect.

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Clear Channel Outdoor Displays Creativity on #Canvas at Cannes

Catering to current trends of craft and crowdsourcing, Clear Channel Outdoor commissioned two “high-profile billboard muralists” to handpaint people’s tweets on a giant canvas during Cannes. And by smushing enough ideas together on a 16m x 4m screen, they’ve set a couple records: This was the world’s first hand-painted micrography billboard made entirely of tweets, and also the world’s first gigapixel image searchable by tweet.

To gather relevant words, CCO started Twitter debates with questions like, “Who owns the creative agenda?” and “Is technology redefining creativity?” People were into it: over the four-day period, the campaign delivered a total campaign reach of 15.7 million impressions on Twitter. “Who owns the creative agenda?” trended number two worldwide. As the responses streamed in, social media visualisations of the #canvas Twitter content were displayed on CCO’s website, digital screens at the festival, and a high-resolution projection to a separate 18m x 5m canvas located on the roof of the Le Grand Hotel.

It’s a sweet reflection of the spirit of Cannes, one that could have only been more accurate if it involved alcohol. See if your tweet was chosen here.

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