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Leo Burnett

Leo Burnett London Adds Pair of Creative Directors

Wayne Robinson&Matt Collier

Leo Burnett London announced today the addition of creative directors Matt Collier and Wayne Robinson.

The creative team arrives from DDB Chicago, where they have worked together since 2011. While at DDB, the pair won over 20 awards, including five Cannes Lions for brands Skittles, Milky Way, Walls, and government-backed adult education program GED. Prior to moving to the states for their DDB Chicago gig, Collier and Robinson began their careers at JWT London before moving on to CHI & Partners. While in the UK, the pair won over 100 awards, working with clients including Shell, Nestle, Toyota, Mazda, Kellogg’s, News International and 888.com. Read more

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UPDATE: Leo Burnett Pitches Miller Lite

MillerLite_PunchTopCan_Pouring

This morning we received several tips claiming that the Miller Lite account now belongs to Leo Burnett Chicago.

We initially found the claim somewhat surprising given that the company only announced its creative review (with subsequent AdAge coverage) in mid-August; we have received no confirmation from agency or client.

However, a quick hashtag search reveals that many of Leo Burnett’s employees spent the long weekend doubling down on the pitch.

UPDATE: our first guess was accurate; the review is just beginning and the hashtag appears to be part of an effort to pitch more aggressively.

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Leo Burnett Celebrates 40 Years in the UK for McDonald’s

Today Leo Burnett’s London office launched a new campaign celebrating the 40th anniversary of McDonald’s arrival in the UK.

The campaign aims to portray the important moments in people’s lives…that just happened to occur at McDonald’s. In “Just Moved In,” (featured above) the most realistic of these scenarios, a family moves in to a new house. After a hard day of moving, they realize there’s nothing in the fridge to make for dinner and head to McDonald’s for a quick meal (which is just fine with the kids).

Other spots in the campaign feature an awkward first date, a rescue meal for a rainy camping trip, and a teen celebrating passing his driver’s test. Leo Burnett doesn’t overreach with the scenarios, instead choosing small moments that compliment larger ones — although the idea of taking a date to McDonald’s does seem a bit of stretch, no matter how young you are.

The broadcast spots are supported by an outdoor campaign “comprised of eight executions which also reminds people that McDonald’s has been there in the background of a myriad of moments all through their lives.” Read more

Leo Burnett Gets Imaginative for Rice Krispies

Leo Burnett London launched a new animated campaign for Rice Krispies inspired by children’s imaginations entitled “Imagine That.”

The campaign’s first spot, narrated by a boy named Toby Jones, imagines Rice Krispies co-existing with dinosaurs. Because the Rice Krispies are constantly trampled by the prehistoric beasts, they enlist a tyranosaurus rex to give them its scream. Armed with the warning yell, the Rice Krispies are now safe from being trampled. Now, since the dinosaurs have long since perished, they just snap, crackle and pop. It’s a cute approach, tapping into the distinct charm of children’s anything-goes sense of imagination and pairing it with some fun animation. The 30-second spot premieres on television today, and will make its cinema debut on Friday. Stick around for credits after the jump. Read more

Leo Burnett Celebrates ‘HappiMess’ for Delta Faucets

Leo Burnett has a new campaign for Delta Faucets introducing the portmanteau “HappiMess” to describe the joy of using Delta’s products to wash away fun messes.

The 30-second anthem ad features a variety of messy situations highlighting Delta’s different faucets. A woman clears a collection of dirty dishes at a dinner party and washes them in her Delta kitchen faucet; children play in a garden and are then ushered inside for a bath; a father and daughter enjoy a muddy hike and then the father washes his hands with a motion sensor faucet; a woman gets blasted with colored powders on a color run and returns to take a shower. “When Delta bath, toilet, shower and faucet innovations make getting clean just as beautiful as getting dirty, that’s HappiMess,” the voiceover intones. As The New York Times points out, the tagline is similar to children’s bath bubble brand Mr. Bubble’s, “Makes getting clean almost as much fun as getting dirty!” Only Leo Burnett aims to translate the idea for adults.

“When you think back to when you were a kid, getting messy in the garden, or baking and getting flour all over you were always considered to be a great things,” Leo Burnett Creative Director Jo Shoesmith told The New York Times. “But for adults, getting sweaty going for a run, or going on a mud run or a color run — those also are moments in life that people love and Delta plays a role in that, because where there’s a mess you need to be cleaned up.”

The campaign, which also features print and digital components, also marks the first time the brand is advertising the whole brand rather than a single product, according to Catherine Roper, director of brand marketing for Delta Faucet. It aims to celebrate the product innovations — such as the detachable shower head with temperature indicator, and motion sensor touch-free faucet — but these can be easy to miss over the course of the ad. Stick around for credits after the jump. Read more

Leo Burnett Tasked with Rebranding McDonald’s

MacDo

A couple of weeks ago we posted on the McDonald’s team’s internal declaration that the company had 18 months to rebrand…or else.

Today — despite both parties’ refusal to offer official comment — someone “close to the matter” who neglected to contact us told AdAge that the responsible party will be Leo Burnett.

The story is vague, but the only thing you really need to know is that McD’s current primary creative DDB and its go-to Happy Meal team at Burnett competed to see who would produce a “significant” campaign that will arrive either later this year or early next year. Burnett (allegedly) won the ensuing Publicis/Omnicom head-to-head.

DDB will retain the account, but this move marks a “boon” for Burnett. The campaign will not stray too far from the “I’m lovin’ it” theme, but based on all we’ve heard we can be fairly certain that the coming work will attempt to focus on the quality of the food on offer under the golden arches.

Given McD’s declining sales and ongoing perception challenges, this will be a tall order.

Leo Burnett Tugs on Heartstrings for Ronald McDonald House

Leo Burnett gets emotional for Ronald McDonald House Charities with their new spot, “Dad’s Voice.”

The 60-second ad highlights the emotional impact of the charity providing home-to-home accommodation for families with a child in the hospital. “It’s only a voice, everyone has one,” a narrator intones at the opening of the spot. “But this, this is dad’s voice. Dad’s voice is, well, dad’s.” Going on to list some of the voice’s idiosyncrasies, the spot concludes, “Dad’s voice is the sound of home, even when they’re not at home.”

It’s a pretty straightforward approach, but it makes a real emotional impact, delivering on a relevant insight for the charity. It helps that the approach is tender without being cloying, choosing not to oversell the drama of the situation but rather sticking to what viewers can relate to. Stick around for credits after the jump. Read more

McDonald’s Has 18 Months to Rebrand…or Else

mcdonalds

A report from Bloomberg’s BusinessWeek tells us that McDonald’s is “setting aside the next 18 months as a period not only to develop the normal lineup of new menu items but also to rebrand itself”. The goal is to change its image from cheap, fast food to something approaching fine(r) dining.

On its last earnings call, McDonald’s CEO Don Thompson said the goal of this soul searching is for the Golden Arches to become “a more trusted and respected brand.”

The implications for current partners DDB and Leo Burnett are less clear.

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Leo Burnett London Warns World Cup Fans Not to Drive Drunk

The World Cup has been over for nearly twenty-four hours, but, knowing a tiny bit about sports, we’d guess that many in Germany, Brazil and Argentina are still celebrating/consoling themselves with the appropriate spirits.

On that note, the creative team at Leo Burnett London wants to remind footie fans around the world that driving under the influence is never an appropriate response–no matter whose team won or what the final score happened to be.

While the spot for road safety charity client Brake is, of course, very of-the-minute, its message is timeless: most cases of drunk driving have absolutely nothing to do with any given sporting event.

Also: fans will never forget that spray foam.

Read more

Leo Burnett, Always Redefine ‘Like a Girl’

In case you missed it, “The Queen of Versailles” was one of the better documentaries released in recent years. Today its director Lauren Greenfield teamed up with Leo Burnett Chicago, Toronto and London (along with help from fellow Publicis shops Starcom MediaVest and MSL Group on PR) to launch a campaign addressing an age-old question: what does the phrase “like a girl” really mean? And why do we still use it?

The agencies involved frame the campaign as a “new social experiment” beginning with a survey that reported some unsurprising findings:

  • A majority of girls see a drop in confidence around puberty
  • Most think of “like a girl” as a general insult, particularly at that age

There’s a social media/UGC component to the campaign, too: the brand will use its various platforms to encourage young female followers to “join the movement and share what they proudly do #LikeAGirl” via pics and videos.

Unlike “Ban Bossy” and various anti-bullying efforts, this one doesn’t purport to have a specific goal; we take it as evidence that businesses and their agencies are learning. The message is nothing if not on-brand, and this documentary-style spot is more intimate and convincing for not involving Beyonce.

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