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Super Bowl

McGarryBowen’s Super Bowl Spot for Pizza Hut Features ‘Professional Baby’

In other pizza-related campaign news, what is a professional baby? How does one go about becoming a professional baby? At what point does an amateur baby turn professional? These and other questions come to mind after watching mcgarrybowen’s “Baby Waterskiing” spot from their #GoForGreatness campaign.

The YouTube inspired spot, which Whitehouse Post editors Tim Warmanen and Carlos Lowenstein sliced together for Pizza Hut’s YouTube-inspired “Go For Greatness” Super Bowl campaign (which also features the spot “Grandma Drummer”) shows several seconds of a baby named Ryder waterskiing before flashing the warning “Do not attempt. Professional baby.” At this point it becomes hard to pay attention to the rest of the ad, which promotes Pizza Hut’s new hand-tossed pizza, because how you can you not dwell on the “professional baby” disclaimer? The 30 second ad ends by inviting viewers to “Upload your greatness” to Pizza Hut’s YouTube page. Especially if you have a professional baby in the house. Stick around for “Grandma Drummer” and credits after the jump. Read more

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Teaser for ‘A Million Ways to Die in the West’ Hints at Explicit Trailer

If you’re Seth MacFarlane, how do you get people to view your three minute long “restricted” trailer for A Million Ways to Die in the West? You take out a Super Bowl ad claiming that you tried to show the trailer during the Super Bowl, but the powers that be decided it “wasn’t family friendly enough” and then direct viewers to your site for the “restricted” trailer. Not exactly an original method, but it’s worked in the past, and MacFarlane was never one for originality anyway.

MacFarlane’s Super Bowl spot, created in collaboration with Santa Monica production company Detour Films, also calls on Ted, the titular talking stuffed bear from his last movie (which, hey, I forgot existed), as a way of reminding fans of that movie that this is the same dude. The restricted trailer for MacFarlane’s new movie is, in fact, too explicit for television, thanks in large part to Sarah Silverman‘s role as a foul-mouthed prostitute, as well as MacFarlane’s own raunchy dialogue. That’s not to say that the Super Bowl teaser itself is wholesome by any means. Between Ted’s “Oh yeah, drunk before the kickoff: new record” line and the suggestion that a certain actor starring in A Million Ways to Die in the West has an abnormally large schmendrick, it stands out as one of the more explicit ads in a particularly tame Super Bowl.

MacFarlane’s new flick features a slew of A-list names, such as Charlize Theron, Liam Neeson, Neil Patrick Harris, Amanda Seyfried, Sarah Silverman, and Giovanni Ribisi. The film is currently scheduled for a May 30th release from Universal Pictures. Stick around for the restricted trailer and credits after the jump. Read more

Mekanism’s ‘Pepsi: Sound Check NYC’ Completes ‘Get Hyped For Halftime’ Campaign

Mekanism concluded their “Get Hyped For Halftime” campaign last night with “Pepsi: Sound Check NYC,” the lead-in to the Bruno Mars Super Bowl halftime performance which acted as a much-needed respite from the ridiculously one-sided game.

The 30-second halftime intro “sound checks” New York City, with giant hands strumming the Brooklyn Bridge like a guitar, playing the Guggenheim like drums, mixing levels on a NYC subway train board and scratching Columbus Circle like it’s a turntable. Other landmarks include the Empire State Building and surrounding skyline, and the East Side Pepsi sign. The spot ends at Met Life Stadium (as you know, located in East Rutherford, New Jersey) with Pepsi’s “Live For Now” tagline. It’s a simple, yet clever little introduction to the halftime show, even if the game itself didn’t take place in New York City. Because, let’s face it, no one wants to see East Rutherford’s top landmarks.

Fred Armisen Hugs Bruce Willis for Honda, RPA

Since few would argue that the commercials were more interesting than the game last night, chances are you saw RPA’s “Hugfest” spot, featuring Bruce Willis and SNL-alum/Portlandia star Fred Armisen.

The simple, straightforward spot features Willis urging viewers to hug those around them that they care about — “the people that matter to you, matter to us” — as a way of emphasizing Honda’s commitment to safety. Armisen then appears and hugs Willis for the duration of the 60 second spot.

“Our simple, yet engaging, big-game spot is intended to highlight not only Honda’s deep concern for the safety of our customers, but the actual industry-leading crash test results that back up our commitment,” explained Mike Accavitti, senior vice president of auto operations at American Honda Motor Co., Inc.

The campaign extends beyond the big game spot, with a large social media component utilizing the hashtag #hugfest. During the Super Bowl, Honda posted “real-time video reactions from Willis about events such as penalties, fumbles and referee calls on the brand’s @Honda Twitter feed.” Immediately after the spot aired, Honda encouraged viewers to send virtual hugs (actually Willis hugging the camera) to loved ones who they couldn’t be near during the big game. Today, Honda is collecting hugs via Twitter by asking people “to send a picture or Vine of their hug with the hash tag #hugfest.” Bruce Willis will then respond with a “meme appraisal of the hug.” Additionally, Honda will have a homepage takeovers at MSN and ESPN, where a 30-second spot “How to Hug” video featuring Willis and Armisen will greet visitors to the sites. You can view “How to Hug,” along with credits after the jump. Read more

Girl Slobbers on Sausage in Carl Jr’s ‘Banned’ Super Bowl Spot (Updated: With CKE Statement)

Ten years after Janet Jackson‘s “Nipplegate” fiasco (and 55 years after “The Day Music Died,” which reminds of simpler times when people were better at naming things), the Super Bowl has become one of the least controversial broadcast TV events. This year’s spots were, in two words, pretty dull. This morning, water cooler talk centered around what was perhaps Peyton Manning‘s worst performance in his storied career, with a few words spent on an adorable puppy befriending horses for Budweiser. Even GoDaddy, America’s idiot PG-rated smut peddlers, were commended by critics for this year creating a spot that was more about a harmless joke than it was about visiting their website to see if Danica Patrick really got naked. Booooorriiiinnnnnggg.

Now, imagine a world in which the above apparently “banned” commercial from Carl’s Jr. ran last night. Would that world be much different from the one that we currently reside in? Well, no, not really. But, at least some group of oversensitive moms in some rural town would have protested this commercial. I mean, do their five-year-olds really need to know that the world is a scary place where scantily dressed cowgirls suck on massive sausages for minutes on end without taking a bite? What about when that mayo or butter or whatever drops slowly onto her left breast? One might say it’s suggestive of semen, dripping slowly off of a large penis getting sucked off at a ranch. Yes, one might.

As for the origin of this spot, we’ve reached out to 72andSunny who tell us the spot was definitely not from them. Also, last we heard, Carl’s Jr. doesn’t make a breakfast sandwich with a comically large sausage stuck in its center. So, we assume it’s some prankster doing it on spec somewhere because he or she was bored. But, in the meantime, we’ll just pretend that this actually ran during the Super Bowl, and that we had something…ANYTHING…more to talk about today.

 

(Updated): We have no a brief statement from CKE Restaurants’ brand’s Carl’s Jr. on the spot:

On behalf of CKE Restaurants, Inc., parent company to Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s restaurants, They say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. But, we had nothing to do with this spoof ad.’”

 

 

Broncos Mascot Faces Another Long Week in W+K NY’s ‘Jersey’ Spot

In a timely follow-up to last week’s humorous “Long Week” spot, W+K NY have released “Jersey,” the latest in their “This Is SportsCenter” campaign.

The 17 second “Jersey” features SportsCenter anchor Stuart Scott and Broncos mascot Miles. Miles, depressed enough after seeing the Broncos steamrolled in the Super Bowl, prepares for what is presumably his end of the bargain following a losing bet with Seahawks mascot Blitz, and Scott feels for him. For the Denver mascot, it’s going to be another long week. “Jersey” is a fun continuation of the mascot rivalry W+K explored with “Long Week,” although we’re guessing Broncos fans won’t be so amused. Stick around for a second look at “Long Week” after the jump. Read more

Eagles WR Brad Smith Talks Super Bowl Ads

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In case you didn’t catch it over the weekend, NFL pro Brad Smith discussed his most anticipated Super Bowl ads, a chat that followed his thoughts on Richard Sherman and more Super Bowl controversy. There’s a prevalent Beats-starring Colin Kaepernick spot that stirs his emotions. It’s quick and painless, and MediabistroTV sat down with Philadelphia Eagles’ wide receiver, who was in town in town to promote his “Design for Brad Smith” competition to talk about the issue.
Take a gander, and to watch more mediabistroTV videos, subscribe to our YouTube channel and follow us on Twitter: @mediabistroTV.

McCann Erickson Launches ‘Not-So-Super’ Campaign for NY State Anti-Trafficking Coalition

McCann Erickson has launched an integrated social media campaign called Not-So-Super to raise awareness about sex trafficking for the New York State Anti-Trafficking Coalition.

“Sex trafficking is commonly perceived as something that happens far away, in other parts of the world. We are eager to try to change that perception.” said Tom Murphy, co-CCO of McCann New York. Because of this, it’s all too easy for people to dismiss the sex trafficking epidemic as something that doesn’t concern them, but it’s a very real issue much closer to home than many suspect.

McCann’s “Not-So-Super” campaign shines a light on the sex trafficking epidemic happening in New York, elsewhere in this country, and all over the world. “It is the buyers of commercial sex who drive such a high demand that girls as young as 12 are trafficked across state lines to meet it. We need to address the day in and day out demand to bankrupt this so-called business model and put an end to the buying and selling of young girls once and for all,” says Sonia Ossorio, President, National Organization for Women – New York City. So McCann is hoping their campaign can help curb the demand for commercial sex, which spikes around big events like the Super Bowl, that leads to the exploitation of women and children by pimps and sex traffickers.

At the center of the campaign is the “Not-So-Super” website and the above video, a harrowing look at the victims of sex trafficking and the increased demand placed on sex workers during the Super Bowl and other big events (accompanied by an increase in the likeliness of physical abuse at the hands of their clients and pimps/traffickers). It’s hard to watch, especially on the Friday going into Super Bowl weekend, but it’s an important message that needs to be shared and a stark reminder that some dread the impending arrival of the big game. The website also offers a telephone hotline for people who are or may know victims of sexual trafficking, and a variety of other resources. The full campaign will “span film, print, street activities, a website and twitter initiatives.” Hopefully, “Not So Super” can help make a difference for victims of sexual trafficking at one of their most vulnerable times of the year.

NFL’s Brad Smith on Super Bowl Controversy

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Super Bowl mania has officially begun. Advertisers are scrambling to make sure their ads get enough hype leading up to Sunday’s big game. And then there’s that other hype we’ve been hearing about involving comments Richard Sherman of the Seattle Seahawks made during his NFC championship post-game interview with Fox Sports’ Erin Andrews.

This morning MediabistroTV sat down with Philadelphia Eagles’ wide receiver Brad Smith, in town to promote his “Design for Brad Smith” competition, and got his take on the Sherman controversy.

We’ll have more on the “Design for Brad Smith” competition during our coverage of New York Fashion Week next week. And to watch more mediabistroTV videos, subscribe to our YouTube channel and follow us on Twitter: @mediabistroTV.

Your Brand’s Logo Could Be Used to Blur Out Digital Streaker’s Wang


Looking for an alternative to a multi-million dollar Super Bowl ad? Enter “Digital Streaker,” a site which launched this past Wednesday, offering brands the opportunity to upload their logo and place it in front of a streaker’s schmeckel. Once you upload your logo, you simply select a site for the digital streaker to run naked across, and then you’ll receive a unique link to the site featuring your logo blurring out digital streaker’s man bits.

Don’t have a logo in mind but want to participate in this bit of Internet mishigas anyway? That’s cool, Digital Streaker also gives you the option to blur out his putz with a cat face, a dolphin, a shuttlecock, pancakes, Kim Jong-un, or a bowling trophy. You can also choose between cheerleader streaker, feathered boa wearing streaker, luchador streaker, and horse mask streaker. I went with luchador streaker with a cat wang, which I sent on over to the official Scientology website.

Digital Streaker Scientology

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