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Posts Tagged ‘David Ogilvy’

Thursday Odds and Ends


-Expedia goes retro in “Thrownback Thursdays” spot by 180LA.

-Dog food fight! Purina sued Blue Buffalo (founded by old-school ad guy Bill Bishop) for false advertising.

-DDB won Mars Brand Royal Canin without a review.

-Advertising is shit: “Copyranter” Mark Duffy compiled a bunch of poop-related ads.

-We Are Social is helping fans of Tullamore D.E.W. Irish Whiskey win a trip to The Emerald Isle.

-Ad/marketing veteran Jack Spilberg joined San Diego-based interactive studio Metajive as VP of client solutions.

-UK agency WDMP hired the creative duo of  Jorge Oliveira and Valentina Lauro from OgilvyOne; the pair previously worked on social media for Ogilvy clients Nescafe and Phillips.

-Baltimore’s Warschawski hired former freelancer Allison Beers as a full-time designer.

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Digitas Associate Art Director Runs a One-Stop Shop for All Your Creative Needs

Stephen Icardi, associate art director at Digitas, and writer Catherine Penfold-Waxman, have assembled the ultimate shopping destination for the ad world. Because nothing is buyable yet, you may find yourself salivating at the possibility of the David Ogilvy Magical Tagline Pipe, or Talent Nurturing Breasts. (“Who knows when your junior help will become your future boss, so start them off right with some sweet nurturing.”)

Creative Miscellaneous Materials LLC stocks something for everyone: an Acronym Polishing Kit for account managers, a Meeting Fodder Detector for hungry interns, and Work Party Unmemory Drops for the CD who drinks the pain away. My favorite is the “Make it Digital” Powder, which is funny because it already seems to exist, in the form clients who refuse to acknowledge the possibilities of online advertising.

This is a fun little piece of gentle in-joking, and I hope that Icardi plans on making actual fake products, because they’ll be perfect Christmas gifts. I would like the Criticism-filtering Head Gear, please, to deal with some of the more uncouth commenters out there.

Here’s Jeff Goodby’s Memo Regarding Today’s Cuts

Numbers have not been revealed but all day, we’ve been hearing from multiple tipsters that anywhere from 50-100 staffers have been affected by reductions today at Goodby, Silverstein & Partners. But from what those familiar with the matter tell us, the numbers skew to the lower side and are not in the realm of the Sprint cuts. Anyways, read the San Francisco agency’s co-founder Jeff Goodby‘s note that was just sent to staff verbatim:

“You’ve heard the financial reasons for reducing our staff.  I just want to talk a bit about the human side of it all.

Please be assured: No one takes this process lightly.

As we often say, advertising is all about people and accounts.  David Ogilvy wrote, ‘The assets go up and down in our elevator every day.’  It is so true.  We value our people, and our humanistic environment, more than anything.

Strangely, that’s why, when we lose business or have cuts in fee, it is important to react thoughtfully, but expeditiously.  Companies that don’t are not prepared for the future, and they don’t serve the people who are still on staff.  They endanger present and future jobs.

We are optimistic about our plan to move forward, in terms of serving present accounts and getting new ones, and will share details next week. But we are also thankful for and deeply appreciative of the contributions of people who are leaving.

We will do everything to find them new situations.  And if history is any indication, we will find ourselves welcoming some of them back in the future.

Thanks for your patience about all this.

JG”

Perhaps JD Beebe can create a follow-up to this?

Op-Ed: Real-Time Marketing Shouldn’t Be Real-Time Spam

Our monthly contributor and Huge client services director, Josh Seifert, returns post-SXSWi to pen this ditty to, as mentioned above, talk real-time marketing in the age of social media. Why bore you with the preamble, though, just read on.

As a marketing professional working in digital, brands like Oreo getting attention in social media is pretty exciting for the shift it represents. As a consumer, the notion that brands en masse should enter social media and begin tweeting, pinning and posting about everyday happenings is more like a dystopian nightmare. Individual brands that have committed themselves to exploring what’s possible in social media, tying it in with broader marketing programs and shifting their approach when necessary can be exciting and creative—the Old Spice YouTube response videos are a great example. Brands that perceive social media as free media with a low barrier to entry may actually be poisonous for everyone else.

A common theme that seems to reverberate from social media professionals advising brands is the need to “be human”  to be successful. Really, this is a polite way to say that every instinct towards managing brands in traditional communications will prove limited and transparent in social media. Basically, brand-controlling memos like this one from Wheat Thins that Stephen Colbert read on air are not human and won’t translate into social media success. What it doesn’t mean, as this short tumblr nicely illustrates, is to generate nonsense content that may be timely, but isn’t actually valuable.

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NFL Player Guarantees Super Bowl Win via Full-Page Newspaper Ad

As the NFL preseason nears and training camp is in full swing, it’s  tradition  for players to promise their team’s fans a Super Bowl title by the end of the year. While these empty promises are typically spoken to local reporters who blow up the offhanded remarks into front page stories, it’s rare that we seen an athlete actually pay to get his guarantee in the paper.

Perhaps inspired by the Albert Pujols‘s exhibition of gratitude to St. Louis fans or Kevin Youkilis‘s (not real) love letter to Boston in Juggs, Carolina Panthers center Ryan Kalil decided to publish his Super Bowl-sized promise in today’s edition of the Charlotte Observer. His essay, titled “Why the Carolina Panthers will win Super Bowl XLVII, employs a simple, clean style of art direction that David Ogilvy would no doubt be celebrating over Twitter were he still alive at over 100. Just look at that bold, attention-grabbing headline and classic serif font. And, if you have some bored copywriting interns, challenge them to re-write the ad to make it more engaging. Then, laugh in their faces when they can’t outdo a football player.

For non-sports fans, here’s some context via Deadspin: “Kalil didn’t tell any of his teammates before taking out the ad, and he’s probably going to come in from mockery today. But fuck that noise. The Panthers and their fans deserve to be enthusiastic, after many years without even a whiff of optimism. They’ve finally got a quarterback, and they’re putting the appropriate pieces around him, and if you can’t go into a season mentally prepared to go all the way, what’s the point of playing the game in the first place?”

Too true, Deadspinners. Media people, how much do you think a full-page ad in the Observer runs for these days? For the rest of you, do you think Kalil employed the likes of a Charlotte-area agency to help him out? Or, do you think this guy is just a natural talent? Critique away in the comments.

Monday Odds and Ends

-Cole & Weber United is behind the first spot in 30 years for apple juice brand, Tree Top (above).

-Did Facebook panic when deciding to purchase Instagram? link

-LJ Kobe, former director of emerging media at AT&T, has joined Ignited’s New York office as group media director.

-A GroupM study forecasts that digital ad spending will exceed $98 billion this year. link

-Yodle alum Steve Liu joined Tribal DDB New York as digital strategy director, SEO.

-Editor/partner Eric Zumbrunnen and editor Stephen Berger have returned to the commercial roster of bi-coastal/London-based Final Cut.

-Someone decided to imagine a conversation between Leo Burnett, Bill Bernbach and David Ogilvy on the topic of social media. link

 

Tuesday Morning Stir

-W+K Amsterdam promoted Clay Mills to managing director. link

-Privacy advocates aren’t too pleased with the FTC’s new “Do Not Track” guidelines. link

-Alex Bogusky draws inspiration from David Ogilvy as part of a new project to help Boulder’s homeless population. link

-Gawker scribes get into a point/counterpoint debate about going into advertising. link

-A handful of ad agencies say clients’ social media spends were “significantly up” from the same time last year. link

-Nothing like a porn viral for Saatchi & Saatchi London to gain attention for its latest New Directors’ Showcase. link

Ogilvy CHI Shows Love for Agency Namesake with Push-Pin Portrait

While the interminable wait for the winner of the McCann push-pin contest continues, we might as well bring you this somewhat related clip that features several folks from Ogilvy’s Chicago office paying homage to their agency’s co-founder via, you guessed it, push-pins. According to the YouTube page, the David Ogilvy mural was concepted by art director Brian Thibodeau and copywriter Bill Wanek and took over 33,000 push-pins in five specific colors to be fleshed out. The end result is a rather sharp, touching tribute, we say.

David Ogilvy Inspires Big Ad Gig Hopeful

Well, it’s apparently down to the final 15 in this year’s installment of the Big Ad Gig and the above submission was one of the few that stood out. Chicago-based copywriter Ben Doessel resurrects the tale and spirit of David Ogilvy and a blind beggar. As it’s been told, during one of Ogilvy’s normal NYC strolls, the ad legend encountered a blind beggar and, after realizing that his cup was empty, decided to add his touch to the homeless man’s sign and changed the text to  “It is spring and I am blind.” Later on when he was headed home, Ogilvy found that the man’s cup runneth over. Inspired by this, Doessel followed suit and it looks like his efforts somewhat paid off. Yes, this will reap karma points.

DDB Celebrates a Century of Bill Bernbach

This year saw two centennials celebrated in the ad industry. June 23 marked what would have been the 100th birthday of David Ogilvy, with the agency that he co-founded, Ogilvy and Mather, honoring the Mad Man with an online video contest and a lavish ceremony at the Cannes Lions Festival.

And now, in case you slept on it, DDB Worldwide remembered Bill Bernbach‘ s 100th over the weekend. The agency co-founder/co-namesake was notable for taking a very hands-on approach to DDB as its CEO, with notable campaigns including Volkswagen’s “Think Small” series of print ads (1963′s “Snow Plow” spot for the automaker is above) and Life Cereal’s “Mikey” TV spots. In contrast to Ogilvy’s fancy party, DDB chose to instead just look at examples of Bernbach’s most celebrated work (pictured below). Oh, and Don Draper raised a glass to Bernbach’s memory as well.

In a statement regarding the centennial celebration, DDB U.K. chief client officer Nick Fox says, “When he co-founded DDB, Bernbach started a legacy – an agency that had the gumption to do things differently, with an honest approach that cut to the quick. DDB Worldwide was founded on the power of creativity, the ability to see things in a way others didn’t. The agency took the notion that social stance was no longer important but intelligence – appealing to customers not by what they did or didn’t have, but by who they were as individuals.”

For those interested in learning more about advertising’s “golden age” where personalities like Ogilvy and Bernbach made a name for themselves, you can pick up the recently published Andrew Cracknell book The Real Mad Men. Until then, have the humility to admit that if you got a creative brief that said, “Sell Hitler’s car to America,” you would not hold a candle to Bernbach’s work.

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