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Posts Tagged ‘Logan Hefflefinger’

Tuesday Odds and Ends

-As part of their 60th anniversary celebration, the Cannes Lions folks have teamed up with artist Gerald Scarfe to brand the city with artwork during the Festival, which begins June 16. See the Cannes crew chat it up with Scarfe at his London home above.

-The Denver Egotist takes a trip inside CP+B’s Boulder HQ. link

-Editor Logan Hefflefinger has relocated from Los Angeles to join Dallas’ Lucky Post.

-The folks behind electronic payment service Square are showing some love for local businesses with a Valentine’s Day campaign called #lovelocal. link

-IL-based B2B creative/digital agency MarketSense has merged with sister company, MarketEffect, to form a new entity called The Mx Group. link

-Mindshare/360i alum Marissa Polin has joined San Diego/NYC-based agency Piston as associate media director for a client roster that includes Cars.com, Sunglass Hut and Mitsubishi.

-Leadership shakeup at Adweek? Leadership shakeup at Adweek. link; link

-A couple of Bay Area creatives are trying to help out an industry colleague whose pup has slipped a disc and has to have $7K worth of surgery. You can go to the “hairy weiner” site to help the cause and donate.

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Jell-O’s Funpocalypse, Much More Exciting Than Actual Apocalypse

We’re only four days away from the 12/21/12 Mayan apocalypse prediction, and as the our alleged time on Earth winds down, Jell-O wants us to have fun. Lots of fun. And when I picture the crazy stuff people will do days before turning into characters from a Cormac McCarthy novel, I think of eating Jell-O.

CP+B continues its work for the Kraft brand with the Funpocalypse campaign, which includes #funpocalypse, a TV spot (above), e-cards, a survey, and a small giveweay where winners get $100 apiece to accomplish bucket-list goals until our planet combusts.

The infographic (below) is strangely the most appealing part of the package. Jell-O and Wakefield Research conducted a national survey with 1,000 adults and asked questions about how people would spend their last days before an apocalypse. You can find out things like: 52% of Americans would be most excited about not having to pay taxes anymore and 4% of those surveyed actually believe the world is going to end.

Other brands have been trying to stop the apocalypse. Old Spice already took Dikembe Mutombo, so I guess Jell-O is banking on sacrificing sugary snacks to the gods to save humanity. If the gods have diabetes, then we’re all screwed. Are there sugar-free puddings available for the health-conscious deities?

And more importantly, what would Bill Cosby have to say about this? Graphic and credits after the jump.

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CP+B Brings Chef Expertise, Fast Food Together for Applebee’s

Applebee’s is separating themselves from the “good ole American” aesthetic. With their new “See You Tomorrow” campaign created by CP+B, they’re emphasizing fresh food, exciting ingredients, and unexpected taste combinations. That means 1,900 restaurants across America are about to become more interesting.

The first two TV spots directed by Jared Hess (Napoleon Dynamite) launch today and feature passionate chefs who fawn over ripe tomatoes and refreshingly acidic lemons. The ad narrator cuts them off before they take their speeches too far, switching to a typical fast food ad. It’s the restaurant equivalent of a high speed car chase—food falls onto pans in quick succession, sizzles on a grill, and then finally comes together on a steaming plate. The two halves of these spots come together to mark Applebee’s transition. They’re putting more consideration into quality ingredients, but they’re still serving affordable fast food.

This campaign also includes online, radio, outdoor ads and in-store elements, highlighting the “fresh flavors of summer.”

Credits and second spot after the jump.

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Drugfree.org, DDB SF Attempt to ‘Rise Above’ the Influence

From DDB’s San Francisco office come three new TV spots for The Partnership @ Drugfree.org’s long-running “Above the Influence” campaign.

Before we dive into these, I’d like to draw your attention to the recent, horrifying anti-meth PSAs we saw from Darren Aronofsky. On a surface level, the PSAs couldn’t look more different, with Aronofsky employing heavy fear tactics and DDB SF attempting to communicate with teenagers using messaging that hinges on positive reinforcement. However, what the two series of PSAs have in common is the fact that each depicts an unrealistic portrayal of drug use. In Aronofsky’s PSAs, a single taste of meth leads to a suicide attempt, and in the above spot, a lack of drinking and smoking weed leads to a teen leaping to school on rooftops a la Spider-Man. Sure, it’s a “visual metaphor,” but as a teen, I viewed this sort of advertising as condescending. After all, it doesn’t take a pharmaceutical degree to know that it’s actually the kids smoking weed that are, in a sense, “flying.”

Here’s the thing, teenagers who read AgencySpy (I know you’re out there): Trying a drug once is not going to kill you, nor will it make you immediately addicted to said drug. However, do too much of a drug, ANY drug, and it will have a substantial negative impact on your life. From a teen’s perspective, though, most things in the world are black and white. To them, drugs have to be either good or bad, so the logical marketing strategy is to portray them as evil vices that will lead to a teen’s untimely demise. We’ve come a long way from “This is Your Brain on Drugs,” but is there a honest, realistic way to depict drug use so teens can make an informed decision their own? So, dear commenters, do we do so through positive reinforcement, fear, or a combination of the two?

Two more spots from DDB SF (including one that employs the “fear factor”) and credits for the one above after the jump.

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