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Posts Tagged ‘Mike Secher’

Hill Holliday, Leslie Mann Make ‘Mom Confessions’ for LG


Hill Holliday, Boston tapped Leslie Mann (Knocked Up, This Is 40, Freaks and Geeks) to voice the inner musings of a jaded mom in their latest campaign for LG appliances.

Mann voices the internal monologue of a character Adweek described as “a cross between FX’s Louie and Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler.” While that may be a slight exaggeration — the character is far more in line with Mann’s roles in Knocked Up and This Is 40 — the spots are certainly far more cynical than anything we’ve come to expect from appliance ads aimed at women, and in fact play off those happy family conventions.

In the most edgy, and, not coincidentally, most successful of these spots, Mann’s character notes that her new LG washing machine is very fast. But what’s a good quality in a washing machine is not necessarily a good quality in a husband, as the character suggestively muses. It’s this kind of honesty and portrayal of a less-than-perfect reality that makes the campaign stand out. Other spots in the campaign trade in the sexual innuendo for goofiness, and while none of them are quite as entertaining as “Too Fast” the approach still feels like a welcome departure from typical daytime TV fare, thanks largely to Mann’s comedic timing. Stick around for credits and “Hot Cookies” after the jump. Read more

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Arnold, Jack Daniel’s Bring Back King Bee, This Time with a Swarm

Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Honey Whiskey has been repped by King Bee for a while now, with the insect always fiercely flying, always backed by rock and roll. In the latest spot, King Bee is followed by his swarm, representing the followers the brand has gained in the last year.

Pre-released on Twitter and Facebook, “Swarm” amassed over 10 million impressions before launching on TV. Though it was apparently carefully calibrated to get the right lighting and “a gritty feeling” (essential for any American whiskey brand), the spot’s not exactly rife with excitement or engagement. It works for exactly 30 seconds, though, and with the accompanying copywriting- “Like any good night out, things get interesting when there’s a swarm.” and “Fly straight. Drink responsibly,” King Bee and his crew get get an A for effort.

Credits after the jump

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Cigarettes and Bodily Waste: The Ugly Truth

Lately, there’s a lot of content to cover on the bathroom humor beat. Yesterday, we reviewed some poop comedy for the new Clorox campaign. Today, we have a 30-second spot titled “Poop vs. Pee” from Arnold Worldwide and truth, the anti-smoking organization. This ad takes a radical shift in tone from meaningless poop jokes. There may be some uncomfortable chuckling here, but the point is to make the viewer aware of two facts: methane, a chemical in dog poop, can be found in cigarette smoke; urea, a chemical in cat pee, is also used in cigarettes. As you’ll see in the clip, there are some silly sound effects and visual representations to make it obvious that bodily excrement is gross, and in turn, chemicals found in our waste shouldn’t be voluntarily inhaled.

On truth’s website, you can read about their strategy for raising awareness, which is echoed in the commercial. They don’t tell people to stop smoking, because that sort of pitch doesn’t work on little children, let alone addicted smokers. So, to get the point across, they appeal to their target audience with alternative methods, such as disgusting facts. Stripping away moralistic lecturing in favor of poop jokes might just be bizarre enough to catch someone’s attention. Credits after the jump.

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Arnold Worldwide Brands Volvos for ‘Real People’

Shots fired! According to this new car spot from Arnold Worldwide, Volvos are for real people, but Mercedes-Benzes are for snooty women of the 1% who preen at themselves in rearview mirrors. This is some good, clean class warfare, automobile-style, and luxury brands better watch out.

A few years ago, a Volvo was a boring car for people who needed affordable transportation. Now, the price hasn’t changed much, but the image has shifted slowly. It’s not that crazy to think that someone with enough money would pick a Volvo over a Benz. And the new spot tugs at the right cords of today’s economic realities to make the comparison seem not only feasible, but preferable. There are also a few campaign teasers on Facebook that flesh out the appeal of Volvo as “luxury for real people,” including: If your dog has a wardrobe, the Volvo s60 probably isn’t for you. Now they’re going after snobby women and people who dress up their dogs! More shots fired, Volvo. I’m in. Credits after the jump.

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Ex-Arnold Folks Go Client Side, But Still Cater to ‘Ad Dudes’

What happens when a bunch of Arnold alums decide to leave the agency world for the client side? Well, besides providing us with more Wednesday fodder, the answer is a paying gig developing spots like the one above for a company called LogMeIn, a Boston-based operation founded in 2003. Last year, LMI lured a few ex-Arnold creatives from its hometown including Paul Schauder, who spent five years at the agency and was a VP/CD on accounts including Radio Shack, Royal Caribbean and Babies R’ Us.

The amusing clip above promotes LogMeIn’s screen sharing app called join.me, which Schauder tells us is “perfect for designers and advertising dudes to use for collaboration or presenting.” We’ll let you be the judge of that, but in the meantime, here’s a national cable spot that you may or may not have seen and which promotes LogMeIn itself. One more clips and credits after the jump.

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