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Posts Tagged ‘Nate Silver’

Monday Odds and Ends

-Ogilvy digital consultancy Social@Ogilvy has formed a global partnership with social intelligence/social monitoring solutions provider Sysomos.

-According to one tipster, Austin agency Sanders\Wingo and their Super Official World Cup Predictor are “out-Nate Silvering Nate Silver.” Check it out here.

-Our old pal Rich Siegel discusses his “Cannegover.” link

-Brightline Interactive, which works with clients with Pepsi, HTC and Sprint, has now unveiled the 10,000 square foot Marvel S.T.A.T.I.O.N experience in New York’s Times Square (video above).

-Publicis Groupe CEO Maurice Levy will not seek to stay in his current role after next year. link

-Oppenheimer Funds has launched a creative agency review. Incumbent Havas Worldwide is not participating. link

-Is it a bad move that Delta wants to trademark “world’s most trusted airline?” link

-R/GA CCO Nick Law talks the thrill of leaving Cannes. link

-YouTube has unveiled the Asia-Pacific region’s top 10 video ads. link

 

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Let’s Talk Ad Math, Vol. 1

This column has been pinballing around my head for the past few months. I’m curious about hashtags. I’m under the impression that although everyone knows what a hashtag looks like, not many people pay attention to Twitter statistics beyond Follower counts. And now that every commercial – online or televised – comes with a hashtag, many of which seem perfunctory, I want to make an inexact science a bit more exact by evaluating basic Internet data and applying it to our coverage for the previous week.

Twitter clearly has value. Celebrities of varying degrees get paid silly amounts of money for sponsored tweets (sidebar: did you know that Melissa Joan Hart makes $9,100 for some of her tweets? That’s more obnoxious than silly). With money and brand equity to be had in the Twitter economy, every company can now slap a hashtag onto a visual ad and pretend to know what it’s doing. Remember when Newsweek ran with #MuslimRage? Or McDonald’s unintentionally eviscerating itself with #McDStories? Twitter can be tricky for the lazy and oblivious.

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Breakfast, MLB Launch ‘Mission Control’ for the Nerdiest Fans in Pro Sports

There are two kinds of Major League Baseballs fans. The first is the type that gets stoked for the season every spring, keeps up through May, gets bored as hell, and tunes back in around September if his or her team has a legitimate shot at the postseason. The second fan is the diehard nerd. Think of the odd bunch of New York sportswriters who started what would become Fantasy Sports in the 1980s. Think of someone like Nate Silver, who got his start in the intricacies of baseball metrics before he became the numbers-driven face of the 2012 presidential election. This type of person, typically one who suffers from a severe case of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, is the driving force behind keeping Major League Baseball alive in an era where the NFL continues to rise is popularity.

With a new contraption, MLB and New York-based agency Breakfast (of “Bike With a Brain” fame) are going to make the palms of baseball nerds sweat. Mission Control, a large interactive device that now resides at the MLB Fan Cave in Manhattan, allows weirdos to see, in real time, statistics about MLB games currently in progress. With more than 30 switches adorning the 20-foot long electronic thingy, fans can see metrics like strikes, home runs, stolen bases, and tweets because why the hell not. It even plays a pretty little light show, because baseball fans love pretty little light shows.

See more on Breakfast’s website here.

If You Missed SXSW, Let Havas Recap it for You in Twitter ‘Novella’ Format

Man, wasn’t SXSW Interactive just the best this year? What’s that? You didn’t get to go due to cost or an obligation to do actual work? Well, lucky for you, Havas Media is happily providing what they call a “Twitter Novella” to tell you about all the fun you missed. Because, wow, it was just so much fun, you guys!

I don’t quite knows what qualifies this as a “novella” per se, but I suppose if you have a bunch of character-based Twitter handles using the same hashtag, then that might as well be the definition. Again, advertisers, you can make any unsubstantiated claim about anything you so long as no one makes the claim before you. Bonus points if it’s somehow involved with social media.

Throughout SXSW, Havas sent a team of its employees around Austin to tweet about the festivities as walking stereotypes would. The Hero Worshipper tweeted about celebs, stalking Grumpy Cat to wherever Mashable had a branded tent. The Data Geek quoted Nate Silver and dispensed somewhat useless statistics. The Bar Fly partied and drank. The Cynical tried to be cynical, but found it difficult due to all the fun. The Optimist loved everything. And finally, The Loner tweeted about loneliness.

Put these tweets together, and it’s though you were actually there instead of sitting at your office wondering how people have the time to ignore work for a week. Catch the Havas tweeters in the upcoming sequel “Twitter Novella: Cannes Edition.”

Op-Ed: What Can Digital Marketers Learn from the Election?

Huge marketing strategist lead Josh Seifert returns with his monthly contribution to this here site. The headline should give you the basic premise of our scribe’s latest entry, in which he reveals who really won out in the wake of the 2012 election. Take it away, sir.

Living in New York, I thankfully did not have to endure the billions of dollars spent on political advertising this election myself, but now that the results are in and our feeds on Facebook and Twitter are returning to their normal political apathy, it’s probably worth exploring what we as marketers learned from politics this year.

Losing a United States Senate race in a conservative state as a Republican used to be the hardest thing in the world, but as Todd Akin and Richard Mourdock learned, the potential impact of saying something stupid is even greater than it used to be. Inflammatory gaffes now extend far beyond the news cycle with social media and instant memeification reaching people who have long since tuned out traditional media coverage. While brands rarely have occasion to address topics as controversial as politicians do, their offline behaviors still have significant potential to be amplified and shared for long periods of time far beyond the incident. Just ask FedEx executives if this old package delivery YouTube video is what they want people finding and watching nearly a year later. Fortunately for brands, this can be merely damaging and not wholly destructive.

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