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Posts Tagged ‘China’

Sina Weibo, China’s Twitter, Valued At $6 Billion

Most mainstream social media networks – Twitter, Facebook, Google+, and YouTube – are banned in China, leaving Chinese social media users to log onto Sina Weibo (China’s Twitter), Renren (China’s Facebook), Tencent Weibo (China’s Tumblr) and Tudou (China’s YouTube) instead. And they’re doing so with incredible quantity.

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Mediabistro Course

Social Media 201

Social Media 201Starting October 13, Social Media 201 picks up where Social Media 101 left off, to provide you with hands-on instruction for gaining likes, followers, retweets, favorites, pins, and engagement. Social media experts will teach you how to make social media marketing work for your bottom line and achieving your business goals. Register now!

Salesforce Marketing Cloud Brings Radian6 Listening Coverage To Russia And China

Marketers can now “listen” to about a billion additional social media users, thanks to Salesforce Marketing Cloud’s newly added Radian6 listening coverage for the Russian and Chinese markets.

Salesforce Marketing Cloud, one of Twitter’s second wave of Certified Products, achieved the new listening functionality through partnerships with the major networks in both countries – Sina Weibo and Tencent in China, VKontakte in Russia.

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Why Are Western Celebrities On Sina Weibo Instead Of Twitter?

Have you seen Iron Man 3 yet?

It opened in North America on May 3. But Robert Downey Jr. fans in China got to see the blockbuster film starting May 1.

Indeed, Hollywood has been making a major play for the Chinese market. According to a recent report by the Motion Picture Association of America, China is now the second-largest box office market in the world. Not only that – last year, more than half of the country’s box office profit was from foreign (read: American) films.

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Chinese Social Media Landscape [INFOGRAPHIC]

So, Twitter is definitely a sensitive subject in China.

As we reported in November 2010, a Chinese bride was arrested – on her wedding day – because of something she retweeted. The Chinese authorities sentenced her to one year of hard labor to “re-educate” her.

Twitter is, in fact, completely banned in the country, as are Facebook, Google+ and YouTube (and many more).

But that doesn’t mean the people of China aren’t still very active on social media.

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China Is Second Country To Applaud Twitter’s New Stance On Censorship

Twitter announced last week that it would start withholding tweets on a country-by-country basis, at the request of specific governments. And although the company has yet to act on this new policy, two governments have already come out in favor of it. And neither of these governments are known for their freedom of speech.
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Twitter Co-Founder Jack Dorsey: “Twitter Can’t Compete In China”

Twitter’s co-founder and Chairman Jack Dorsey says that Twitter simply can’t compete in China – but it’s not Twitter’s fault.
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3 Ways China’s Weibo Could Actually Compete with Twitter

Within China, Twitter is basically non-existent: people use Weibo, instead, a similar service previously available only in Chinese. On Monday, the Chinese company released an English translation of its iPhone app that has many wondering if it is planning to compete directly with Twitter in the future. Here is my take on what Weibo needs to do if it wants to stand a chance against the entrenched Twitter.
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Twitter Activists Sign Petition to Free China’s “Twitter Prisoner”

Apparently, three words of her sarcastic tweet back in November landed a Chinese woman in a hard labor camp – and human rights activists are saying Twitter needs to say much more than just three words in response.
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Chinese Bride/Activist Jailed for Single Retweet

The past few weeks have been rife with news about people getting into trouble because of their tweets, but this appears to be the harshest punishment dolled out recently: A Chinese bride was arrested – on her wedding day – because of something she retweeted. The authorities have sentenced her to one year of hard labor to “re-educate” her. Amnesty has stepped in to plead for the woman’s rights, but thus far authorities aren’t budging.
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