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Posts Tagged ‘Gary Pruitt’

Weekend Show Preview – 8.24.14

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Who’s on the talk shows this weekend? Glad you asked.

Highlights include Rep. William Lacy Clay (D-MO) on ABC’s “This Week” and CBS’s “Face the Nation” and Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) on “FOX News Sunday.”

Not all lineups have been announced. But click through for those that are and we’ll continue to update throughout the day.

Read more

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AP CEO Outlines Steps to Press Freedom

AP President and CEO Gary Pruitt gave a speech today at the National Press Club to lay out a plan to ensure press freedoms in the aftermath of DOJ secretly seizing AP phone records.

He outlined five steps to safeguarding freedoms. They include a chance to be heard before docs are taken, judicial oversight, updated guidelines at DOJ (he says they’re antiquated), enacting a federal shield law and assurance of follow-up to what AG Eric Holder has stated regarding reporters: “The Justice Department will not prosecute any reporter for doing his or her job. The Department should not criminalize — or threaten to criminalize — journalists for doing their jobs, such as by calling them co-conspirators under the Espionage Act, as they did Fox reporter James Rosen. This needs to be part of an established directive, not only limited to the current administration.”

Pruitt’s full remarks are on the AP website. See them here.

AP Prez Blasts DOJ for ‘Unconstitutional’ Actions

Associated Press president and CEO Gary Pruitt told CBS’s “Face The Nation” on Sunday that the DOJ’s secret seizure of two months of phone records was “unconstitutional.”

In his first television appearance since the subpoena was revealed, Pruitt, who worked as a First Amendment lawyer earlier in his career, blasted the Justice Department, saying the First Amendment rights of the AP had been violated.

“And so now they possess the phone records of thousands– thousands of news gathering phone calls of the Associated Press, and they are required to narrow– under their own rules, they are required to narrow these– this request as narrowly as possible, so as to not tread upon the– the First Amendment. And, yet, they had a broad sweeping collection, and they did it secretly. The rules require them to come to us first but in this case, they didn’t, claiming an exception saying that if they had, it would have posed a substantial threat to their investigation.”

Because the seizure of phone records, which included calls to and from cell phones, home phones and office phones belonging to AP and its reporters, was done without the organization being notified, Pruitt said DOJ violated the Constitution. The AP had only been notified after the fact via a letter from the Washington, D.C. U.S. District Attorney.

“I don’t know what their motive is, but I can tell you their actions are unconstitutional. We don’t question their right to conduct these sort of investigations. We just think they went about it the wrong way. So sweeping, so secretively, so abusively, and harassingly and over broad that it constitutes that it– that it is an unconstitutional act.”

Watch the full interview with Bob Schieffer here.

Correction: We incorrectly had an IRS reference in the first graph and have since corrected it.

AP Responds to Latest DOJ Letter

In a letter to DOJ, Gary Pruitt, President and CEO of the AP, offers his thoughts on what he believes really happened.

An excerpt: “They say this secrecy is important for national security. It is always difficult to respond to that, particularly since they still haven’t told us specifically what they are investigating. We believe it is related to AP’s May 2012 reporting that the U.S. government had foiled a plot to put a bomb on an airliner to the United States. We held that story until the government assured us that the national security concerns had passed. Indeed, the White House was preparing to publicly announce that the bomb plot had been foiled. The White House had said there was no credible threat to the American people in May of 2012. The AP story suggested otherwise, and we felt that was important information and the public deserved to know it.”

See the full letter here.

Fish Food: Media Matters Forgets AP Story

(A sprinkling of things we think you ought to know)

AP-DOJ conflict doesn’t matter to Media Matters– Media Matters for America, the progressive watchdog dedicated to discrediting conservative media, has no coverage of the Associated Press-Justice Department fiasco that blew up Monday night.

A search of MMFA‘s website for “Associated Press,” “AP” and “Gary Pruitt” produce no results related to the conflict, in which the Justice Department secretly seized phone records of some of AP’s staffers. Pruit is the AP‘s president. He called the ordeal “a serious interference with AP’s constitutional rights to gather and report the news.”

Republicans in Congress, the conservative media and even mainstream media have all jumped on the story, calling it an example of government overreach. While MMFA is an openly progressive non-profit, the organization generally peddles along with the news cycle, posting stories and sending out email blasts that either rebut the conservative side or provide more context meant to render the story a wash.

We’ve requested comment from MMFA‘s Sr. Director of Communications Jess Levin.

On the other end of things, conservative media watcher NewsBusters, has covered the story.

Greta wonders if you ever feel like a caged feline– FNC’s Greta Van Susteren asked the rambunctious readers of her Gretawire blog this morning, “Do you ever feel like this baby tiger?” In her blog post was a video of what actually looks like a vicious tiger sitting in a glass cage, snarling directly at the camera. “Do you know someone else who currently feels like this baby tiger?” her post continues. One reader replied in the comments section: “Do not call, do not text me first thing in the morning before my first cup of coffee LOL…REALLY!” News reports as of late have Van Susteren possibly moving out of her 10 p.m. time slot.

How to NOT make it about me– ABC’s Robin Roberts, co-anchor of Good Morning America, had a well-publicized battle with breast cancer and subsequent bone marrow transplant over the last few years. GMA seemed to run story after story about her recovery. Even so, Roberts didn’t pounce on the opportunity to make actress Angelina Jolie‘s double mastectomy about herself at all. “Terrific Tuesday at GMA,” she tweeted this morning. “We will discuss Angelina Jolie’s decision to have a double mastectomy. She wrote a moving OP-ED in the NY Times.” And that was it.


Morning Reading List, 12.27.07

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Good morning Washington.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • Most of you spent more than $400 on holiday presents.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “In the beleaguered newspaper industry, one chief executive has long stood out as the golden boy: Gary Pruitt. He skillfully managed the McClatchy Co. chain and last year engineered the $4.6 billion takeover of Knight Ridder Inc., one of the largest in the history of the business.”

  • Following our item yesterday, FishbowlDC heard from Post ombudsman Deb Howell, who confirmed that she’s staying at the Post for a third year.

  • In case you were wondering, “Fishwrap vs. Fishbowl” — there is no connection.

  • Mike Allen’s Playbook reports, “OOPS: A reporter was kept off Clinton’s press charter today because the reporter didn’t have her ID.”

  • The New York Times reports, Sylvan Fox, the first ‘rewrite man’ to be singled out for a Pulitzer Prize, died on Saturday at New York University Medical Center. Mr. Fox, who also worked as a reporter and editor for The New York Times, was 79 and lived in Manhattan.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Free news online will cost journalism dearly”

  • Check out Omnivoracious’ “Reviewing the Reviewers

  • WTOP’s Mark Segraves will start writing a monthly column for Hill Rag papers, the first one will be in January.

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    TV

  • From DCRTV:

      Yes, that’s DC TV and radio veteran Frank Herzog (right) in the new “National Treasure 2: Book Of Secrets” movie. The current WTOP news anchor, who used to be the radio voice of the Redskins and a sports anchor at Channels 9 and 7, appears with star Nicolas Cage, who is talking to the president, played by Bruce Greenwood, at his birthday party at Mount Vernon. As they are looking at a map at George Washington’s home, Herzog walks up and says: “Happy Birthday, Mr. President,” and the president says: “Thanks, Frank.” Also, Herzog played a dance contest judge in 2006′s “Step Up,” which was filmed in Baltimore…..

  • The Washington Times reports, “The Federal Communications Commission doesn’t need a procedural overhaul, despite criticism from Capitol Hill as well as commission Democrats, Commissioner Robert M. McDowell told reporters last week.”

  • The AP reports, “The Republican chairman of the Federal Communications Commission is disputing Democratic assertions that a new rule loosening restrictions on media ownership is full of loopholes and will lead to a wave of mergers and fewer choices for consumers.”

  • TVNewser reports, “MSNBC’s Chris Matthews is back in Washington for Hardball, but he began his day in New York, guesting on Morning Joe, sans Scarborough. As Willie Geist and Mika Brzezinski were thanking Chris for his appearance he jumped in and gave a classic Matthews yelp. ‘This is the greatest show in the morning. This is better than Imus! Haaaa.’”

  • Inside Cable News is just wondering — is this TMI?

  • A release announced, “Reuters/C-SPAN/Zogby daily tracking polls in Iowa kick off today with one of the most competitive presidential elections in modern history just around the corner. This partnership brings together the biggest and the best in the news and polling industries, teaming up Reuters – one of the largest news agencies in the world — with one of the most renowned pollsters in the world, and C-SPAN, the groundbreaking source for news about our federal government.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Romney Takes Break From Bird-Flapping to Call Out Carl Cameron”

  • TVNewser reports, “ABC will be setting aside a Saturday night of entertainment programming next week and will air back-to-back Republican and Democratic candidate debates. Moderated by ABC’s Charles Gibson, the debates will take place in New Hampshire Saturday, Jan. 5 and are being produced in conjunction with Facebook and WMUR-TV. During the debates, Facebook users will be able to participate in groups, which will ‘provide a companion to the televised debates.’”

  • Huffington Post reports,Chris Matthews Imitates Vampires, Flunks Geography”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Talking Points Memo reports, “Bill Clinton Was Kinda Right, Media Is Obsessed With Horse-Race And Is Toughest On Hillary.” (Hat Tip Playbook)

  • Huffington Post’s Jay Rosen writes, “The Hill Restores Armstrong Williams to Legitimacy. Why?”

  • Machinist presents, “The year in technology”

  • A reader writes in, “DUUUUDE!!! That was the most unhappiest of ‘happy hour’ clips of all time. Thanks for sending me into a dark hole of despair for Christmas, Gavin!!” Whoops.

  • The Seattle Times reports, “When Jim Romenesko isn’t running the premier Web page about journalism-industry news, he is monitoring two other subjects: unusual news stories at ObscureStore.com and the world’s largest coffee-shop chain at StarbucksGossip.com.”

  • CBS’ Chip Reid shares, “Five Things I Learned in Ten Days With Edwards”

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    RADIO

  • News Busters reports, “Once again, those class-warring liberals are organizing a luxury cruise. This time, it’s National Public Radio talk show host Diane Rehm.” For more info, click here.

  • WTOP reports, “When President Bush appeared with D.C. firefighters after the fire at the Old Executive Office Building, it wasn’t by chance. Not that anybody thought it was, but it wasn’t orchestrated by the West Wing press office either. It was the brain child of D.C. Fire and EMS spokesperson Alan Etter.”

  • In the latest installment of Blogs The Famous Media Reads, His Extremeness presents XM’s Rebecca Roberts.

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    JOBS

  • Bisnow on Business is seeking a smart, experienced and energetic editor.

  • The New Republic is looking for reporter-researchers for the 2008-2009 internship program.

  • The Society of American Florists has a great job for a newbie writer-editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 06.25.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • According to the PEJ Talk Show Index for June 10-15, “That marked only the second time all year that immigration was the leading talk subject.”

  • Washington Post reports, “A graduate student who drove David Halberstam when the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist was killed in a car crash will be charged with misdemeanor vehicular manslaughter, the prosecutor said Thursday.”

  • Richard Stengel on “The Chris Matthews Show”? Somewhere, Glenn Greenwald wonders if Ana Marie Cox will blog about it.

  • Great media movies.

  • A reader writes in about this, “wolf i s more like 5’7.” From another reader: “I have stood next to Wolf Blitzer, who is not tall. 5’8″ is generous.”

  • Check out former Hill newspaper writer Peter Savodnik’s latest piece in GQ.

  • From The Hollywood Reporter: “The global entertainment and media industry will expand at a 6.4% compound annual growth rate over five years to hit $2 trillion in 2011, according to a PricewaterhouseCoopers report released Thursday.”

  • The Washington City Paper reports, “anyone with a stake in the doings of Fenty’s administration is going to find the scoop in the Post, with the competition trailing by a good 20 furlongs. And the competition has a problem with that.”

  • AP reports, “The New York Times Co. plans to raise the cover price and home-delivery rates for the newspaper next month.”

  • Forbes offers excerpts from Gary Pruitt, chairman, president and chief executive of McClatchy, at the Newspaper Association of America’s annual Mid-Year Media Review in New York. Huffington Post takes a closer look at the review.

  • Check out Judy Miller on Blogging Heads.

  • The Chicago Tribune reports, “Confidence appears to be ebbing on Wall Street in Tribune Co.’s ability to pull off a complex, $8.2 billion deal to take itself private in partnership with Chicago billionaire Sam Zell.”

  • Reuters reports, “The major U.S. TV networks, after a slow start to the annual advertising negotiating season, have completed most of the prime-time commercial deals at prices above a year ago.”

  • “Beet.TV has learned that The New York Times will make the embed code of its video clips available to the public by early fall. This means that many of the paper’s videos will be freely used and posted to blogs and Web pages.”

  • Public Eye takes a much closer look at MSNBC’s report about journalists contributing to political campaigns. Business Week also weighs in. Matthew Yglesias calls it “fundamentally misguided.”

  • “There’s a new Web site called Real People Real Stuff where anyone can post a classified video.”

  • Jon Friedman writes, “‘Cyberphobia’ afflicts many Time Inc. writers.”

  • Reuters reports, “Internet advertising and access spending by U.S. consumers will rise each year by double digits on average through 2011, fuelled by high-speed connections and social networking and entertainment sites, according to a forecast released on Thursday.”

    Jobs

  • The Media Research Center is looking for a communications director since Michael Chapman has left, reports Bluey Blog.

  • SNL Financial, LC is looking for an Insurance News Reporter.

  • Richmond.com is looking for a News Reporter.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for an Editor of Real-Time and Web News.

  • Washingtonpost.com is looking for a Developer for Editorial Tools, an Application Developer for Editorial Tools and a Sports Editor.

  • The Project On Government Oversight is looking for a “strategic thinker for Director of Communication.”

  • A Washington DC based think tank focused on transatlantic relations is looking for an Online Producer/Web Editor.

  • Religion News Service is looking for an Editorial and Publishing Assistant.

  • Council on Foreign Relations is looking for a Associate Director, Communications and Marketing.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 04.03.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Lots and lots and lots of coverage of the recent Tribune deal. (Hat Tip: Romenesko)

  • Almost no one got busted by an April Fools joke. Are you too smart or no fun?

  • Jack Hurley, “deputy director/senior VP, broadcasting, for the Newseum and its backer, the Freedom Forum” talks to B&C’s John Eggerton.

  • At AFI Silver, an Arch Look at ‘Broadcast News’

  • We’re At War; That’s Front-Page News Every Day

  • E&P reports, “While newspaper circulation continues to slide, readership is growing, especially with younger readers — when taking online newspaper sites into consideration. According to the latest data from the Newspaper Association of America, newspaper Web sites contributed a 13.7% increase in total newspaper audience for adults 25-to-34.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “MSNBC.com, the No. 2-ranked news Web site behind Yahoo News, is starting its first branding ad campaign this week.”

  • Are journalists predisposed to substance abuse? Tell us what you think.

  • Slate gives us this: “The WP takes a moment to explain why President Bush opting not to throw out the first pitch at a ballgame isn’t news. TP is just as confused as you are.”

  • Washington Whispers reports that Daryn Kagan “has found a new outlet for her special style of reporting: PBS. Come June, she airs Breaking the Curse, a documentary about a mom who dealt with her daughter’s death by helping Indians with leprosy.” More here.

  • CQ reports, “Baseball’s New TV Deal Draws Hill Scrutiny.” It is also drawing scrutiny from Virginians.

  • Chris Wallace torches Keith Olbermann.

  • Washington Business Journal reports, “American Capital Strategies and an affiliate have invested $160 million in Geosign Group Holdings and Geosign Corp., collectively known as Geosign, an online publishing company
  • Business Week explores the question, “Is Google Too Powerful?”

  • Bloomberg reports, “McClatchy is in talks to form advertising partnerships with Google, Yahoo and Microsoft to grab a greater share of Internet spending, says CEO Gary Pruitt.”

  • Reuters reports, “Time Warner’s AOL says its Advertising.com unit will manage advertising sold on a new online video venture being built by News Corp. and NBC Universal. Advertising.com will also manage ads inserted into an embedded media player to be used by the venture’s distribution partners.”

  • New York Daily News reports, “Should New York mayor Mike Bloomberg run for president of the United States, he will have a major ally in Rupert Murdoch.”

  • Philadelphia Inquirer reports, “Comcast chief Brian Roberts received about $27.8 million in compensation last year, according to a statement the company filed with federal regulators.

  • Reuters reports, “The New York Times’s new Classic Crossword Widget gives users the ability to personalize their Google home page with the newspaper’s crossword puzzle.”

  • Beet TV reports, “The Washington Post is revamping its home page to make video more prominent. A new, sleek, black media player, spanning nearly the entire width of the page, displays three windows with featured videos. The player can be ‘pushed’ to the right to present more multimedia offerings.”

  • M V Kamath, chairman of Prasar Bharati, India’s national public broadcaster, predicts a gloomy future for newspapers.”

  • Radar reports, “The Huffington Post, the left-leaning opinion collective and news aggregator that bears her name, is adding hundreds of new diarists in time for its two-year anniversary on May 9.”

  • Drudge reports, “During a live press conference in Baghdad, Senators McCain and Graham were heckled by CNN reporter Michael Ware.”

  • TVNewser tells us, “Greenfield May Be On CBS Within Month.” CBS News President Sean McManus said, “Jeff’s writing, reporting and analytical skills are second to none.” Greenfield’s start date is May 1.

  • Washington Business Journal reports, “Discovery Communications says it has agreed to buy Cox Communications’ 25 percent stake in the company for $1.28 billion.”

  • Gawker took “a little gander” at some of Salon’s recent filings with the SEC.

  • TVNewser has highlights from Newsday’s profile on Sean Hannity.

  • FOX News Channel tells us they were the first cable news network to break today’s tragic news of the shooting in Seattle at the University of Washington.

  • Yesterday from Reporters Without Borders: “Reporters Without Borders today voiced its serious concern about the continued detention in the Gaza Strip of British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) reporter Alan Johnston and appealed to the Palestinian Authority president and prime minister to take a tougher line with his kidnappers to obtain his release.”

  • Politico’s Ryan Grim takes “A Jab at JibJab.”

  • Mark Lasswell thinks George Stephanopoulos “knows more than he lets on about firing U.S. attorneys.”

  • Slate is fixing up The Fray “with the help of our users.”

  • Last night was the first night of “World News’” special series — “Key to the World” — that is taking ABC’s Bill Weir to remote places that are examples of the major challenges of our time. Last night was from Kiribati in the Pacific Ocean. Check out the report.

  • A reader writes in, “It’s been my experience that people who comment online tend to be obsessive trolls whose opinions should be taken with a grain of salt (and yes, I realize that I am currently commenting on a blog). Post.com is still the best news website around. And it looks clean and articulate. Just like Barry O. And no, I don’t work for WaPo.”