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Posts Tagged ‘Robert Allbritton’

FCC Approves Sale of WJLA, News Channel 8 to Sinclair Broadcast Group

sinclair_allbrittonThe FCC yesterday approved the sale of Allbritton Communications, owner of WJLA and News Channel 8, to Sinclair Broadcast Group. The deal was announced in July 2013 pending FCC approval for $985 million.

According to TVSpy, with the acquisition, ”Sinclair owns, operates, programs or provides sales service to 162 stations in 78 markets. Sinclair stations now reach nearly 40 percent of US television households.”

POLITICO publisher Robert Allbritton, who’s family owned Allbritton Communications for nearly four decades, tweeted:

In an interview for POLITICO, he touted the successes of POLITICO - not WJLA or News Channel 8 - and supported the future of Internet-based communications. Read more

Mediabistro Course Management 101

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The post Featured Post appeared first on MBToolBox.

Your Sunday Guide to WHC Weekend

champagne-goldRounding out White House Correspondents’ Weekend are two brunches taking place the Sunday after the big dinner. This year, we have the annual Allbritton Garden Brunch and another by Yahoo/Tumblr.

Below are the relevant dets. We hope to see you there!

Allbritton Garden Brunch
Sunday, May 4
Hosted by POLITICO Publisher Robert Allbritton and his wife, Dr. Elena Allbritton
Indian décor and fare and feature food by Wolfgang Puck’s The Source

Yahoo News / Tumblr WHCA Brunch
Sunday, May 4, 11am
Hosted on the rooftop terrace of the Newseum

Party on!

Politico’s New Prez and CEO: Jim VandeHei

images-5When you read through the lengthy internal memos and formal press release on Jim VandeHei‘s ascendance to President and CEO of Politico and Capital New York, you quickly see they’ve got something for everyone: romance (he and Publisher Robert Allbritton are “of one mind” with each other; gumption (he is part of the best journalistic “dream team” in America, says Allbritton) and a menacing quality with a religious twist (VandeHei writes, “The days of untouchable incumbents in media are over – this is the era of abrupt change. We have no choice but to keep delivering the goods, better, faster and more efficiently. Or someone will do unto us what we have done unto others.”)

So no more double bylines with Mike Allen (a.k.a. Mikey)? Say it isn’t so.

But it is. VandeHei’s going corporate and will work alongside COO Kim Kingsley and Chief Revenue Officer Roy Schwartz to run the business side of both publications. He’s replacing Fred Ryan, who stepped down last month. Not to worry, there are the expected effusive thank you’s to Ryan as well as the nod from Ryan that VandeHei is absolutely the right man, the only man for the job.

See the memos. Politico‘s Hadas Gold released the announcement last night on the publication’s media blog. The news is still leading the blog today.

You’ve gotta hand it to Politico in that their memos are hilarious in their bravado and  unrivaled prowess to douse one another in praise. They never hesitate to express an explosive self-confidence and desire to take over the media world on this planet and every other. We’ve cataloged our Top 10 Favorite Lines after the jump… Read more

NYT Smacks Politico: Jill’s Revenge?

It’s tricky to write a story about a new competitor and not come off as a tad defensive and afraid.

The NYT, which has “obsessively” covered every “twitch and shiver” of Politico‘s existence, has a piece out by Leslie Kaufman that appears to be some sort of preemptive strike against the new Robert Allbritton publication – CapitalNY – that claims to be taking aim at the powerful and complex New York media machine that includes the NYT.

To be sure, the story, which published Sunday, adopts a snide tone against Politico. Kaufman describes Allbritton Communications as “the cash-rich media company that owns Politico, which obsessively covers every twitch and shiver of Washington.”

Every inch of the story oozes with the notion that Allbritton – like the failure spinoff pub TBD – may have bitten off more than he can chew. “Is this Jill’s revenge?” asks a Washington media insider on condition of anonymity and referring to NYT Executive Editor Jill Abramson. “She was clearly outraged at that Politico piece on her controversial management style. What better way to hit back than to order up a condescending piece about their new pet project. What’s weird is the purpose seems so transparent.” That story, published in April, can be found here.

The downside of the piece: the NYT‘s smacks the newly owned operation down before they’ve even had a chance to find their sea legs. The upside: People like an underdog, they may want a scrappy pub like CapitalNY to show up the NYT.

On an amusing note, they spelled Politico Dylan Byers‘ surname like this: “Byars.” The mistake was corrected by 8:45 a.m.

And something else: The writer explains that Byers jumped in to help CapitalNY “post news” but never explains that he and CapitalNY writer Joe Pompeo beat the NYT on the story of Rick Stengel leaving TIME for the State Department. This story, like the one they published last week, fails to credit Politico/CapitalNY for that story, although sources tell us that the NYT astonishingly explained to them why they wouldn’t be crediting them. Byers and Pompeo contacted NYT Media Desk Editor Bruce Headlam on the matter. Bruce replied to Pompeo’s emails and took Byers’ call.

See our catalog of insults after the jump… Read more

Full Disclosure: WaPo’s Wemple Really F%@ked Up TBD

WaPo‘s opinionated media blogger Erik Wemple wrote a down and dirty piece Monday on Robert Allbritton‘s purchase of Capital NY. Nothing that remarkable in it except for his own disclosures of what a failure he believes he was at TBD. Actually who knows…maybe the story had juicy nuggets, but we were all tunnel vision on those full disclosures. And not one, but two. Come on, Erik Wemple Blog! Couldn’t have been all your fault. Stop being so hard on yourself!

A. “That same year, Allbritton launched Washington-area news site TBD.com, a generously funded project that fizzled in near-record time under the editorial guidance of the Erik Wemple Blog.”

Some 14 graphs later…

B. “By acquiring Capital, the Politico brain trust shows that it’s learned some things since the quick and spectacular failure of TBD.com under the editorial guidance of the Erik Wemple Blog.”

Wemple goes on to discuss the reasons TBD may have tanked, and funny, some seem to have little to do with him. Read more

Do Jim VandeHei and Brian Stelter Have Mental Telepathy?

How cringeworthy.

In NYT‘s Brian Stelter‘s story on Politico owner Robert Allbritton acquiring Capital NY today, he interviews the venture’s new President Jim VandeHei.

We’re not sure which is worse. Stelter asking VandeHei a truly softball question and acting like it’s anything more than that, or VandeHei reading his mindRead more

Allbritton Buys Capital NY, VandeHei Named President

Watch out New York. Politico owner Robert Allbritton just took a bite out of the journalism industry there by purchasing Capital New York, an online news site created by  Josh Benson and Tom McGeveran.

Politico‘s Executive Editor Jim VandeHei has been named President of the new venture. He will remain in his role at Politico in Washington and still spend the majority of his time there. Benson and McGeveran will remain as co-editors. Katherine Lehr will be VandeHei’s number 2 and will be moving to Manhattan. In the next month they will hire on two dozen new reporters, with more to follow. Cally Stolbach, central on Politico‘s business team, will split her time between Washington and New York as Capital‘s new Director of Business Development.

Things could turn into a bloodsport. Word on the street is that they’ll be poaching the “best and brightest” from New York publications. Inside sources explain to FishbowlDC that it’s clear they see weakness in the New York Times as they saw in WaPo in 2007. They think they can go into their core areas – city and state politics, media – and beat them at their own game by instituting a new one. “It’s game-on with the Post and Bezos,” said one source. “We all have different approaches and audiences, but the fight for dominance was just taken to a whole new level.”

See Allbritton’s lengthy memo. It was dispatched to staff last night just after midnight. Read more

Journo Couple Heads to Ann Arbor

About a month ago, Miles Smith, a weekend producer at WJLA, left his job. And Friday was Steve Friess‘s last day with Politico Pro. The couple is relocating to Ann Arbor, where Miles (pictured at far right) will return to school and Friess will resume his freelance writing career.

We’re thinking their respective office meetings in the last year made for interesting pillow talk. As is common knowledge, Robert Allbritton sold WJLA to Sinclair Broadcast Group.

See his heartfelt memo, including the revelation that he and his partner plan on becoming fathers. Read more

Morning Chatter

“This ad on the Metro certainly caught my attention.”USA Today travel writer Nancy Trejos.

WJLA employee on Robert Allbritton‘s sale of the TV station to Sinclair: “”Monday was a pretty big shock to the staff and now we are adjusting to the news. Sinclair has a certain reputation that looms over it, but we’ve been told today’s Sinclair is not the Sinclair of five years ago. There are a lot of questions about what it all means for us. … People in the newsroom have talked about receive messages from people in the business expressing their condolences.” And another WJLA employee: “My initial reaction was dread! ABC7 is the most relaxed, comfortable, fun newsroom I have ever worked in. Sinclair’s reputation is frightening. Those of us who have been around a while are more worried about the younger employees. Afraid of layoffs. But now i am more philosophical, and management is working to sooth fears and reassure employees.”

WEINER’S DOING WHAT? In case you missed the news…BuzzFeed will host Anthony Weiner at “BuzzFeed Brews” on August 12 in Manhattan at The Ainsworth, where Editor-in-Chief Ben Smith will interview Weiner for 45 minutes. They say the topic matter will be “wide-ranging.” Thank God. The interview will livestream on YouTube and BuzzFeed.com.

Unforgettable Thursday headline in WaPo…

See the story here.

NPR hires media critic…According to a release, media critic Eric Deggans is joining NPR News as a TV critic and correspondent. Deggans, a longtime TV and media critic at the Tampa Bay Times, begins reporting fulltime for NPR in October. Today he will be honored at the National Association of Black Journalists annual convention as the recipient of its 2013 Arts & Entertainment Task Force Legacy Award, given to a veteran A&E journalist who has set an example for others in the field.

In defense of two TV journalists

“Yes, I will do everything to defend @SharylAttkisson & @jaketapper b/c they are a dying breed. Don’t give them shit or I will bitch at you.” – Breitbart NewsMary Chastain.

 

 

Fishbowl5 With FP CEO David Rothkopf

This week Susan Glasser, Editor-in-Chief of Foreign Policy Magazine for the past three years, dropped a bombshell on her staff and announced that she was leaving the publication for Politico, where she will head up a longform magazine-style writing department that will reportedly cost Publisher Robert Allbritton a good chunk of change. In recent weeks, FP has lost top writers like Josh Rogin to The Daily Beast and Kevin Baron to Atlantic‘s new Defense One. What’s more, the mag recently parted ways (amicably, we’re told) with Ed Diller, the publisher, as did the sales rep he brought over from the WSJ.

An FP source explained to FishbowlDC, “Ed was based on the West Coast, the other rep in NYC, and they were both extremely talented and good at their jobs. It just made sense for FP to redouble its efforts at its headquarters here in DC, and so that’s what happened. It certainly isn’t a reflection on their abilities and they both left the company on good terms.”

Sources tell us Rogin and Baron also left on good terms. “Baron is an excellent reporter – he was well-liked by his colleagues, he broke stories, worked his ass off, and did everything he was supposed to do. He may be able to provide more context regarding his departure. Rogin left to take the job at The Daily Beast. It was just a really good opportunity for him, and he’d done a lot here at FP.”

So how does FP CEO David Rothkopf feel about all the changes? Well, we asked him. And it turns out he had a hell of a lot to say.

It can be tough when an Editor-in-Chief leaves or it can be a bright spot, a sense of relief. What was your gut reaction when Susan Glasser told you she was leaving FP for Politico? I have a lot of respect for Susan and all she has accomplished not only at FP but also at the Washington Post. Her contributions to Foreign Policy—bringing it into the Internet Age, if you will—were enormous. But there are also creative cycles within organizations. Sometimes it can be helpful to hit the reset button, reevaluate and embark on the next period of change. This is a 44-year-old company that has gone through a number of such cycles and emerged stronger from each. That is what our intention is now. We have some big changes on the horizon—expanding coverage, new products, deepening the relationship with our readers in important ways—and so this can certainly be seen as a win-win moment. Good for Susan. And the beginning of new, great things for the FP community.

At least some of the staff appeared to be surprised by the news. Were they not given warning about it? This was handled just as it would be in any organization. Susan and I discussed for a couple of weeks. When we decided on what was going to happen we developed a plan to coordinate the messages from FP and Politico to ensure that this was seen as what it was, an amicable change that would begin important new eras at both publications. We then told top staff and made sure everyone in the organization was informed before the news broke publicly. We had a team meeting on Monday and the mood was just what you would hope for—appreciation for Susan and enthusiasm about the great opportunities that lie ahead.

Who will replace Glasser? Does Rothkopf know yet?

Read more

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