TVNewser Show TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Ryan D’Agostino Named Editor-in-Chief of Popular Mechanics

Ryan D’Agostino has been named the new editor-in-chief of Popular Mechanics. He comes to the magazine from Esquire, where he had been since 2006. D’Agostino most recently served as Esquire’s articles editor. D’Agostino is succeeding Jim Meigs, who is leaving Popular Mechanics after 10 years to work on a book.

While at Esquire, D’Agostino’s work was honored with two National Magazine Awards and a James Beard Award. He previously worked as a senior editor at Money, and is the author of Rich Like Them. His writing has appeared in publications such as The New Yorker, The Wall Street Journal, New York and The New York Times.

In related news, David Granger, editor-in-chief of Esquire since 1997, will also serve as editorial director of Popular Mechanics.

“Ryan is not only a skilled editor and writer,” Granger said, in a statement. “He’s also an embodiment of the Popular Mechanics reader — doing renovations on a house that is more than a century old, keeping an aging pickup truck running and living at the intersection of humanity and technology. He’s got the passion that will redefine the authority of this brand to meet the challenges of the 21st century.”

D’Agostino’s appointment is effective May 1.

Mediabistro Course

Get $25 OFF Freelancing 101 Online 

Freelancing 101Freelancing 101 starts in less than a week! Don't miss your last chance to save $25 on full registration for this online boot camp with code FLANCE25! Starting April 28, this online event will show you the best way to start your freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. Register now! 

More and More | Famous Thoughts | Seen it All

AllTwitter: Coming soon to a Twitter feed near you — native ads! Get excited people. This is what life is all about.

GalleyCat: Alicia Silverstone has written a parenting book which contains plenty of good advice because she’s marginally famous.

AllFacebook: A study found that Facebook users really enjoy checking-in at the Grand Canyon. Makes sense. It’s not like there’s anything to see there, might as well be browsing Facebook.

Actually, Starbucks DOES Know How to Spell Colombia

ColombiaFacebookPicFor today’s example of a journalist linking to an article without fully reading that article, we turn to Boston-based GlobalPost blogger Timothy McGrath. Halfway down McGrath’s dishonor roll of celebrities, companies and media outlets that have recently and erroneously trumpeted the country of Colombia as “Columbia,” he calls out Starbucks.

However, had McGrath properly read Wall Street Journal Bogota-based reporter Dan Molinski‘s piece about the social media movement spearheaded in February 2013 by Colombian digital media executive Carlos Pardo, he would have realized that Starbucks is in this case not to blame:

The movement can take its nagging too far. When a television show about plans Starbucks has to come to Colombia [in 2014] misspelled the country, many here quickly blamed Starbucks itself. Hundreds of Colombians, with national pride on display, used it as a rallying cry to urge the company to stay away.

Starbucks said it wasn’t to blame. “Our 42-year heritage with Colombian coffee farmers dates back to Starbucks’ 1971 founding. We definitely know the difference between Colombia and Columbia,” the Seattle company said in a statement.

Read more

Katie Couric’s Advice for Young Journalists

As she winds down production of her syndicated show and ramps up interviews for her role as global news anchor at Yahoo News, Katie Couric spent a few minutes with MediabistroTV earlier this month to talk about her First Big Break in the business. It was a break that would put her on the path to “Today” show anchor-dom. How she got there, what she learned, and what advice she has for young journalists who want to break in to TV news:

To watch more MediabistroTV videos, subscribe to our YouTube channel and follow us on Twitter: @mediabistroTV.

Matt Harvey Commits Twitter Balk

ShutterstockMrMetMost of us are familiar with the weekly social-media exercise known as “Throwback Thursday.” But in the case of sidelined Mets ace Matt Harvey, it was more like “Blowback Tuesday.”

To mark the six-month anniversary of his Tommy John surgery, Harvey earlier today tweeted an October 2013 photo showing him lying in a hospital bed with middle finger raised. The picture quickly disappeared from Twitter as did, soon thereafter, the account from which the photo was tweeted (@MattHarvey33). Per ESPN New York Mets beat writer Adam Rubin, the recovering pitcher decided – at least for now – to get out of the Twitter game after his middle-finger hospital snap generated some controversy:

The Mets confirmed requesting the deletion of the tweet with the photo because it contained a potentially offensive gesture, but the team added that the decision to delete the account belonged to Harvey.

Read more

Professional Artist Seeks Pitches That ‘Represent the Entrepreneurial Art Community’

Professional-Artist-ArticleProfessional Artist is known as the “artist’s guide to making it.” This subscription-only pub for visual artists focuses on all things business — including law, marketing, portfolio development, exhibition presentation, communication skills as well as sales techniques.

The mag is 90 percent freelance written and editors are always on the hunt for new writers: “We are always looking for new voices and perspectives to fully represent the entrepreneurial art community,” [Jannett Roberts, publisher] says. Be sure to check the editorial calendar before sending in your pitch:

Roberts says the editorial calendar is set in advance, so editors will work to match topics with contributors who have a strong background in a specific area, such as art licensing or business development. Topics must relate to the art-business theme of the magazine. “We hardly cover technical applications of art making or critique art,” Roberts says. Freelancers are welcome to pitch features, which often range from 1,200 to 1,300 words.

For more pitching advice, read: How To Pitch: Professional Artist.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Vogue Makes Changes Ahead of Website Revamp

vogue-logo-editVogue is beefing up its web presence in advance of vogue.com’s revamp.

WWD reports that the new site will debut in September, during New York Fashion Week. How fashionable! Or whatever.

Regarding those staffing changes, here are the details so far:

 

ASME Names 2014 Cover of The Year Finalists

The American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME) has announced the finalists in its Cover of The Year contest. According to the judges — which included editors, photo editors and art directors — the following magazines have a shot:

  • New York
  • Bloomberg Pursuits
  • Bloomberg Businessweek
  • Boston
  • Sports Illustrated
  • Food & Wine
  • O, The Oprah Magazine
  • W
  • Vanity Fair

Our favorite? Probably Businessweek (pictured), which also won our Cover of The Year reader’s poll.

ASME will announce the winner April 30. Click through to view all the fantastic finalists.

Vin Scully, Illustrated

LARegisterVinScullyWithout a doubt, Vin Scully is the only current MLB play-by-play man who chose to annotate – for future broadcast use – Amanda Foreman‘s February 21 Wall Street Journal article “A Brief History of Avoiding Exercise.”

Per a wonderful graphic in the Los Angeles Register by visual columnist Sharon Henry, the 86-year-old Scully is still idiosyncratically at-it in Chavez Ravine. From her Vin-diagram:

He’s highlighted the [WSJ] part that describes how one out of three World War I draftees was unfit for combat. He imagines a time (perhaps when a player is out of breath after running to second) that he can share this with his audience.

Read more

Felix Salmon Leaves Reuters, Quartz Adds Two, Yahoo Names Exec Editor

A couple moves this morning involving Reuters and Quartz, the business site from The Atlantic. Details are below.

    • Felix Salmon is leaving Reuters. The New York Times reports that Salmon hasn’t disclosed where he’s headed next. Salmon had been with Reuters since 2009. Prior to that he worked for Portfolio.
    • Quartz has hired Nikhil Sonnad and Jenni Avins. Sonnad will be a reporter on the site’s Things team and Avins a lifestlye reporter. Sonnad comes to Quartz from Sydney’s The Global Mail. Avins was a contributing editor to New York’s The Cut.
    • Susan Kittenplan is joining Yahoo as executive editor of media initiatives. Kittenplan is the founder of Kittenplan Catalyst LLC and formerly an executive editor of Allure. She has also previously served as a senior editor at GQ, deputy editor at Glamour, and associate editor and researcher at Vanity Fair.

NEXT PAGE >>