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Another NY Times Front Page Error

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The New York Times is having a rough couple weeks. Today’s front page was published with a glaring typo — “Panic Were Ebola Risk is Tiny; Stoicism Where It’s Real.”

Obviously, no one is perfect, but just last Tuesday the Times published an A1 article without a subhead or a byline. The article also began mid-sentence.

Two front page typos in just two weeks is just not a good look. It is fun for the rest of us, though. So let’s see if they can make it three in a row next week!

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Renewal Scam Targets NY Times Subscribers

If you’ve recently received a “renewal notice” from The New York Times, ignore it. It’s a scam. The Times sent out a notice that a variety of “independent solicitation companies” are targeting subscribers to the Times and other publications. The Times stated that there has been no breach of subscriber information.

The bogus companies go by a slew of names, including Associated Publishers Network, Associated Publishers Services, Circulation Billing Services, Customer Access Services, Magazine Payment Services, and more. The bills [pictured] ask consumers to send their payments to an address in Oregon or Nevada.

Times subscribers are automatically renewed, so any request for payment is not from the company.

If you have questions about the scam, you can call the Times (800.698.4637) or send an email to subscriberrelations@nytimes.com.

[Image: The New York Times]

NY Times’ Sulzberger: Cuts are ‘Painful’

During a talk at NYU, Arthur Sulzberger Jr. — the New York Times’ publisher — told the audience that the layoffs and buyouts currently making their way through the paper are “painful.”

Early last month, the Times announced it would be reducing its newsroom by 100, via either buyouts or layoffs. In a note explaining the plan, Sulzberger and CEO Mark Thompson stated, “We know that they will be painful both for the individuals affected and for their colleagues.”

As Capital New York reports, Sulzberger went back to that “painful” description again during his NYU talk. ”We have more journalists today than we’ve ever had in our history,” said Sulzberger. “The skills necessary to succeed in this world are truly changing, and that’s not necessarily age-related. This is not to suggest going through these cycles is not painful. It is.”

We imagine 100 Times staffers agree.

Newspapers are Really Excited About 2016 Election

Editors at America’s top 15 newspapers are losing their minds with excitement about the 2016 presidential election. According to a new Pew study, in the first nine months of the year there have been 541 articles written about the election. That’s already double the amount of articles that were written about the 2012 presidential election during the same period in 2010.

Unsurprisingly, the two people who get covered the most are Chris Christie and Hillary Clinton. Newspapers surveyed by Pew have already featured 82 articles each about the potential candidates. Keep in mind that neither has officially said they will run. Just imagine what will happen when (not if!) they do.

It’s only 2014, but there is no escape. You must read about the 2016 election. You must read about the 2016 election. YOU MUST READ ABOUT THE 2016 ELECTION.

[Image: Fotostory/Shutterstock.com]

New York Times Launches Madison Ads Archive

NYTMadisonNavThink of madison.nytimes.com as a kind of Grey Lady equivalent to Wikipedia. When clicking into the home page, visitors are greeted with the following:

The New York Times archives are full of advertisements that give glimpses into daily life and cultural history. Help us digitize our historic ads by answering simple questions. You’ll be creating a unique resource for historians, advertisers and the public — and leaving your mark on history.

Get started with our collection of ads from the 1960s (additional decades will be opened later)!

Read more

NY Times Publishes Error-Filled Front Page

Editors at The New York Times won’t look back on today fondly. Not because of a particularly sad news item, but because of an error-filled front page.

Somehow, an A1 article was published without a sub-headline or a byline. It also began mid-sentence. That’s about as bad as it gets.

The Times’ David Gelles, who tweeted the image, accurately described it as “painful.”

[Image: Twitter/David Gelles]

Dorian Nakamoto Wants to Sue Newsweek

Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto, the man who Newsweek reported had created Bitcoin, wants to sue the magazine over its cover story. According to TechCrunch, Nakamoto is trying to raise the necessary funds to sue the glossy on a site called NewsweekLied.com.

When the Newsweek story ran, Nakamoto told everyone who would listen that he had no involvement in Bitcoin. In fact, he claimed that the only reason he had even heard of the digital currency was because a Newsweek reporter contacted his son about it.

NewsweekLied explains that Nakamoto suffered as a direct result of the Newsweek article:

Dorian’s family was confused by Newsweek’s article. He and his brothers were misquoted. In some cases, words were attributed to them that were never said. In the chaos, his mother believed that the authorities were planning on removing her from her home to put her in a care facility. His estranged wife and children were alienated by the story, which portrayed a person and situation different from their understanding of their husband and father.

Hilariously, donations to Nakamoto’s cause can be made by Bitcoin.

[Image: NewsweekLied.com]

Journalism Student Gets a Crash Course in Newspaper Delivery

SarahFentonTwitterProfilePicIf the Orange County Register is looking for a silver lining to this week’s massive home-delivery debacle, it may want to consider the plucky case of subscriber Sarah Fenton (pictured). As relayed by OC Weekly‘s Gustavo Arellano, Fenton took it upon herself to deliver to her gated-community neighbors the bundle of print newspapers cavalierly left dumped in front by the paper’s new delivery partner.

From Fenton’s Facebook post:

Today would have been day three without receiving a paper, but on my way to school this morning I found a bundle of OC Register papers scattered on the ground outside our community gates.

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Daily News Hires Two, Promotes Six

NY_DNThe New York Daily News has hired two on the business side and made five editorial promotions. Details are below.

  • Colleen Noonan joins as VP, marketing and creative services. Noonan, a former veteran of Hearst, was most recently a consultant with Pitney Bowes.
  • Melanie Schnuriger has been named VP, product development. She was most recently a managing director at SixAgency.
  • On the editorial side, Kristen Lee has been promoted to director of digital development. She was previously digital integration editor.
  • Zach Haberman has been upped to from news editor, digital, to deputy managing editor, digital.
  • Andy Clayton has been promoted to deputy managing editor, digital sports.
  • Cristina Everett has been promoted to deputy managing editor, digital entertainment. She was most recently senior editor, entertainment.
  • Christine Roberts has been promoted to editor, mobile and emerging products.
  • Brad Gerick has been promoted to director of social media. He most recently served as social media manager.

Orange County Register Has a Weekend on Par with Angels

oc registerOn the one hand, it’s a victory for print journalism. Dozens of Saturday and Sunday newspaper subscribers outraged that their papers were not delivered. On the other hand, the Orange County Register‘s solution only added fuel to the ire.

“Free copies of the Sunday and Saturday papers are available in the OC Register lobby at 625 N. Grand Avenue, Santa Ana until 5 p.m. today,” the paper posted Sunday on Facebook, prompting a string of angry reader comments and a different tack from the paper. One that sounded a lot like the remarks being made by members of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim after being swept out of the MLB playoffs Sunday by the Kansas City Royals:

No excuses. We are sorry for the lack of delivery in your neighborhood, and the inconvenience this has caused you and family members this weekend. The only acceptable solution is receiving your newspaper and timely delivery to all subscribers… and we’re working toward that goal. We are correcting the breakdowns in routes, and are actively responding to each person who has contacted us at customerservice@ocregister.com.

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