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NY Post: Women Should ‘Deal With’ Catcalls

NY Post Logo 10-14The New York Post isn’t satire, is it? Just wanted to be sure, because a piece titled “Hey Ladies — Catcalls are Flattering, Deal With It” was just published, and it’s so awful it must be a joke.

Doree Lewak, a features writer for the Post, simply loves to be sexually harassed by men. She cannot get enough. “When I know I’m looking good, I brazenly walk past a construction site, anticipating that whistle and ‘Hey, mama!’ catcall,” writes Lewak. “Works every time — my ego and I can’t fit through the door!” Uh…

Lewak goes on to explain that being belittled by strangers makes her a feminist:

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All the Competition News That’s Fit to Recall

newyorktimes-logoThe answer to this great trivia question is: D.M. Redfield. He’s the New Haven, Connecticut reader whose proposed new motto for the New York Times was declared the winner back in 1896.

Wisely, in the end, the NYT decided to stick with “All the news that’s fit to print.” From Adrienne LaFrance‘s item for The Altantic about the paper’s $100 tagline-our-paper competition:

The Times wrote that it had received entries from nearly every state in the union — there were 45 of them in 1896 — and signaled out entries from women. Many contestants “wholly ignored the request for a motto or phrase of only ten words of less,” the Times wrote. Some of the other ideas that readers sent:

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Maureen Dowd Joins NY Times Mag

maureen dowd GMaureen Dowd, who has been with The New York Times since 1983, has a new gig at the paper: Staff writer for its magazine. Dowd will continue to pen her weekly op-ed column, a staple of the paper since 1995.

In a statement, Jake Silverstein, the Times Magazine’s editor, said Dowd was “a brilliant addition to our team.” “While I can’t disclose any specific assignments yet, I can reveal that Maureen’s subject matter for the magazine will range far afield from her current bailiwick of politics, foreign affairs, Hollywood, and edible marijuana,” added Silverstein.

Andy Rosenthal, editorial page editor of the Times said, “Maureen’s influence on our Op-Ed page can’t be overstated and I’m very happy that our readers will continue to hear her timely take on whatever the hot issue of the moment happens to be.”

Newspaper Columnist Says Newspapers are Dead

DavidCarrHeadshotWell this is certainly depressing. David Carr, the well-known and respected New York Times media columnist, has seen his future and it is grim. In his latest piece — published in a newspaper — Carr proclaims that newspapers are dead.

Carr cites the recent trend of companies — like News Corp., Time Warner, Gannett and Tribune Company — spinning off their print brands and sending them into the unknown abyss as an indicator of print’s health.

He’s right; it’s not looking good. But we’d stop short of the dire tone taken by Carr:

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Mark Aldam, President of Hearst Newspapers on the Future of Print

Mark-Aldam-ArticleMark Aldam, president of Hearst Newspapers, has been working in the field of print journalism for close to 30 years. He has seen the changing media landscape firsthand and has some ideas on how to keep print afloat.

In our latest So What Do You Do column, Aldam explains how Hearst differs from its competitors (such as News Corp., Tribune, Gannett), what most excites him about the newspaper business and why print isn’t dying:

I think there’s obviously some truth to the concern about the printed newspaper’s future given just the relationship between print ads and the size of the paper that most publishers produce. But my first response is: I believe that the printed newspaper will be around long enough to print our obituaries. I think the newspapers that have responded to where consumers demand to access news and information — which is in their palm, and on their desktops and tablets — I think we stand a very good chance of being an influential part of the community…

For more from Aldam, including what his typical day is like, read: So What Do You Do, Mark Aldam, President of Hearst Newspapers?

NY Times Launches Enhanced Archive Search

Subscribers to The New York Times can now search 129 years worth of the Grey Lady. The paper has launched TimesMachine, an interactive archive search tool that allows readers to dig through 11,298,320 articles that were published between September 18, 1851 and December 31, 1980.

In connection with TimesMachine, the Times has launched the NYTArchives Twitter account, which posts interesting articles from throughout the paper’s history.

While using TimesMachine to view coverage of big events — such as the “awful event” that was the assassination of Abraham Lincoln — is great, what’s really fun is searching for specific terms.

For example, a quick search for “O’Shea” brought up an article from 1906 that was headlined “Irishmen and Genius.” Even way back then, the Times featured stunningly accurate journalism.

Tabloids Do Their Best with Ebola Scare

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The Ebola outbreak is good news for the city’s tabloids. All it took was a man being tested for the disease at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan for the New York Post and New York Daily News to crank up the fear machine.

We have to give the win to the Post, who simply decided to yell “Ebola!” at readers. No need for getting creative, just shout and hope for panic.

The Daily News, meanwhile, fell short by admitting what the hospital’s officials and CDC said: That the man likely didn’t have the disease. When it comes to fear mongering, the worst thing you can do is give facts.

New York Times Amends Carol Vogel Article

NYTEditorsNoteLogoThe first paragraph of Carol Vogel‘s July 25 New York Times article no longer reads like this. The text has been amended and the following Editors’ Note has been added at the bottom:

Editors’ Note: July 30, 2014
The Inside Art column on July 25, about a planned exhibition of the works of the Renaissance painter Piero di Cosimo, started with a description of the artist’s life and eccentricities. That passage improperly used specific language and details from a Wikipedia article without attribution; it should not have been published in that form. (Editors learned of the problem after publication from a post on FishbowlNY.)

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NY Times Changes Dining Section to ‘Food’

NY Times logo GThe New York Times is making some changes to its Dining section — specifically, it is being renamed “Food” and will be edited by Sam Sifton. Food staffers will also be combined with staffers working on the NYT Cooking site and (yet to be released) app.

Assisting Sifton will be Susan Edgerley, serving as the Food section’s deputy editor.

“The Times has long been a leader in covering all aspects of food and dining,” wrote Dean Baquet, executive editor of the Times, in the memo announcing the news. “The launch of the new Cooking app, along with combining the newsroom’s editing and reporting talent in one team under the direction of Sam and with Susan’s editorial and managerial help, will enhance our coverage and make it even more delightful and useful for readers.”

You can read Baquet’s full note below.

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Newspapers Lost 1,300 Editorial Staffers in 2013

ShutterstockNewspaperStack_FeaturedAccording to The American Society of News Editors’ annual census, newspapers are more diverse despite losing three percent of newsroom staff.

Overall, there were about 36,700 full-time journalists employed at roughly 1,400 papers in 2013. That’s represents a 1,300-person decline, from 38,000 in 2012. Of those journalists, about 4,900 (13 percent) are racial and ethnic minorities. That’s a 200-person increase from 2012.

“Producing the employment census each year is a significant effort on the part of ASNE, but as the leaders of America’s newsrooms, we feel it’s essential to keep this data front and center,” said ASNE President David Boardman, in a statement. ”We remain committed to doing all we can to help our newsrooms, and our news reports, better reflect the diverse nature of the communities we cover.”

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