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Our Town

A Long Way from Knoxville in a Nutshell

When Chris Whittle co-founded the magazine Knoxville in a Nutshell with Phillip Moffitt and several others, the Etowah, Tennessee native could only dream of The Hamptons. All these years later, Whittle, who went on to serve as publisher of Esquire, is responsible for what is being reported as the area’s dreamiest residential listing yet.

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Per the Wall Street Journal and The Real Deal, Whittle and his wife are selling the East Hampton property they have owned since 1989 for $140 million:

The 11.2-acre estate includes a 10,000-square-foot, six-bedroom Georgian Revival shingle-style house and more than 1,100 feet of water frontage.

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Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101

Freelancing 101Learn how to manage a top-notch freelancing career! Starting December 1, you'll hear from our expert speakers on the best practices for launching a freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. Register now!

Barry Diller Makes Waves with Grandiose Park Plan

Curbed NY’s headline for today’s announcement that IAC chairman Barry Diller and his wife Diane von Furstenberg are endowing a proposed 2.7-acre offshore park and performance space in place of Pier 54 reads: “$130 Million ‘Pier 55′ Park Looks Like Something Out of Avatar. But for a majority of the New York City residents commenting in response to today’s front-page New York Times article, the tenor is more Titanic.

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If completed, the project will sit directly across the Hudson River from Hoboken’s Pier C (pictured). From the NYT comments:

WR: If this private island gets built, who will bear the cost when its piers start rotting – yes cement rots – earlier then expected? Diller did say 20 years, obviously that is when engineers have told him the thing should start falling apart.

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Cheater Nancy and Trader Joe’s

TraderJoesLogoThe newest item tagged on The Cut with “Both Sides of a Breakup” involves a pair of lawyers, Ian and Nancy. On the eve of the couple’s planned marriage, the whole thing came undone thanks to Nancy’s behavior at the home of two-buck Chuck with a two-timing Charles:

IAN: My best friend’s wife called me and said she was in a terrible position but she had to tell me something. She said, “Did you and Nancy break up?” And I said, “No! Why?” And she said, “I saw her with Charles… you need to ask her what’s going on.” She had seen Nancy and Charles making out at Trader Joe’s. Trader fucking Joe’s. It was like a scene from a movie. Suddenly, everything came together. It was literally like that last scene in The Usual Suspects.

And how do New York magazine readers feel about TJ’s role in all this? One suggests the grocery chain should be thought of as “Traitor Joe’s,” while another puts this aisle-mess on the level of Lisa Raye at a Turks and Caicos fish market.

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Fashion Editor Showcases the Naked Subway Look

Although Instagram quickly took down a photo posted by Peter Davis, group executive editor of The Daily Front Row, the New York tabloids today are all over it. The picture of a naked, drunk man riding the subway wearing only shoes and socks is on the front of the Post and inside the Daily News.

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European Artist Alters NYC Street Signs

Some fun content and pics today over at Animal about a French-born, Italian-based street artist now doing his decal thing in Manhattan.

You have perhaps already noticed one of Anecleto Abraham‘s “installations.” The artist known more commonly as Clet came to town late last month and has quickly pursued his penchant for punchline-ing familiar directional instructions. From Animal founder-editor Bucky Turco‘s piece:

Though the NYPD may disagree, Clet doesn’t consider himself an outlaw. “I am not a criminal,” said the 48-year-old Frenchman to Animal. “It’s opinion. I don’t destroy nothing.”

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All the Bible News That Was Fit to Print

NYTStreetscapesLogoThis weekend’s New York Times ”Streetscapes” article about an early Manhattan skyscraper built in 1892 and demolished in 1920 leads off with some wacky NYC newspaper history:

In 1888, when Cyrus Field sold the Mail and Express to Elliott F. Shepard, the newspaper was losing money, a failing amalgam of other papers. But Shepard didn’t care; he had other things in mind. In the same year, Shepard, a Presbyterian, bought control of the Fifth Avenue stage line to stop it from running on Sunday and violating the Sabbath.

Shepard altered the Mail and Express into a religious enterprise, unusual for a mass-market newspaper, with a biblical text on the front page every day, and what the Chicago Daily Tribune said were editorials that were “free from wickedness.”

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A Tall Tale from a Rudy’s Regular

ShutterstockOlegCassini2001There’s a ton of local color in New York Times metro reporter Annie Correal‘s feature piece “In New York City, Sunday Night Is for Regulars.” Correal roamed the city for a month on weekends, late, so as to chronicle the way residents reclaim their neighborhood bars and restaurants after the Friday-Saturday crush of outer-borough invaders.

When Correal visited Rudy’s Bar & Grill in Hell’s Kitchen, she met Frankie, a toupee-wearing regular who pulled out from his pocket a photo of famed fashion designer Oleg Cassini and claimed to be the man’s son. “No one in 10 miles knows what I know, “Frankie told her insistently. But his story didn’t check out:

A few days later, I went back to Rudy’s to find Mr. Cassini. He had said he was the son of the designer, and had grown up with the city’s crème de la crème, but this had proven impossible to confirm. As far as I could tell, Oleg Cassini had only had two children, daughters.

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New York Rails Against Guardian Subway Critique

First stop! The Guardian:

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Second stop! Gothamist and MTA spokesperson Adam Lisberg:

“When she complains that the subway uses too many fonts, it seems clear that she hates our subway less than she just loves to complain. There are literally books written about the MTA’s single font and unified graphic design; if she doesn’t notice there’s only one font (or when she claims the subway uses ‘tickets’), it’s hard to take her seriously.”

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Daily News Reporter Goes Elmo Undercover

AdamEdelmanTwitterProfilePicBetter red than dead? Not in this case. For his recent Times Square efforts, New York Daily News political reporter Adam Edelman (pictured) earned a measly total of just one dollar in tips.

As Elmo, Edelman tried several different sidewalk locations. He encountered some well-organized Smurfs before being unwittingly exposed:

Suddenly a woman noticed the tiny camera propped up in my Elmo mouth (we were after all, documenting this experience) and began to warn nearby mascots about my presence. Without warning, a Batman and a Spider-Man were in my face.

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Dan Aykroyd on the City That Never Blinks

GhostbustersStillIf Dan Aykroyd had partied the night before his British GQ interview with a vodka brand other than the one he is responsible for, his answers would likely have been groggier. But as he explains to Aice Howarth, there’s no hangover from Crystal Head because he’s cut out the glyceride.

The actor also had a great answer when asked for some of his fondest memories from the Ghostbusters shoot:

“I always remember walking down Madison Avenue in the full Ghostbusters costumes and stealing shots with the crowds, in other words not filing a permit to shoot in New York but just going in and getting the shots but people’s reactions were so funny.”

“First they looked at us, you know, with the packs and everything, and were like “what?” and then there was this kind of acceptance “oh, that must be some new kind of exterminator or sanitation guy or something” [laughs], in the way that New Yorkers sort of accept everything and move on. It was really, really funny to see their reactions. I’ll never forget that.”

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