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Ice Cube Leaves Rap Fans Disappointed

Donovan Strain turned the rap world upside down in January when he dissected Ice Cube‘s “It Was a Good Day” single from 1993. After extensive research, Strain determined Cube’s good day was January 20, 1992 when:

  • Yo! MTV Raps aired
  • It was a clear and smogless day in Los Angeles
  • Beepers were commercially sold
  • The Los Angeles Lakers defeated the Seattle SuperSonics
  • And Ice Cube had no events to attend

Another blogger with too much time on his hands claimed Strain’s theory was incorrect and the good day was actually November 30, 1988.

Mike Ryan of The Huffington Post sat down with Cube and finally got some clarity straight from the rapper:


Someone spent a lot of time trying to figure out your good day from “It Was a Good Day.”
Yeah, I heard about that one. Yeah.

Through your publicist, you responded, “Nice try.”
Yeah.

“Nice try,” you got it right? Or “Nice try,” but not even close?
“Nice try” on even trying to dissect that.

The original research shows that it’s Jan 20, 1992. Someone else thinks it’s Nov 30, 1988.
I think I had a good day on both of those days. You know.

Is this your Carly Simon, “You’re So Vain,” song? That you’ll never admit when it was? Then you’ll auction the answer off some day to one guy who, under contract, can’t reveal the day?
Nah. You know — it’s a song. It’s a fictional song. It’s basically my interpretation of what a great day would be. Do you know what I’m saying? So, you know, it’s a little of this and a little of that. I don’t think you can pinpoint the day.

So you’re saying it’s a collection of good things from multiple days?
It could have been all of those days.

So it’s a conglomerate of your perfect day?
Yes.

Well, that’s certainly a letdown.

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