TVNewser Show TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Associated Press’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Comcast Pleads Case | DirecTV Restores TWC | Breitbart Loses Whip

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

comcast-twc

As Comcast Takes Next Step in TWC Merger, Opposition Groups Band Together (TVNewser)
Comcast took the next step in its $45 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable Tuesday morning by filing a joint Applications and Public Interest Statement with the FCC. In a blog post about the filing, Comcast EVP David Cohen argued that the deal is good for consumers, especially current TWC customers. Those opposed to the deal, understandably, don’t think so. Fifty groups sent a letter to the attorney general and FCC chairman Tuesday asking that the deal be blocked. Capital New York The 650-page document filed with the FCC outlines the reasons Comcast believes the proposed merger with TWC would be in the public interest. Much of the document spelled out in granular detail arguments made by Comcast in its original announcement of the proposed deal, but there are some notable new takes. Comcast now sees itself as a tech company, in competition with Google, Facebook and Netflix just as much as traditional competitors like DirecTV and Verizon. Comcast argues that it doesn’t compete with TWC, as they do not operate in the same areas. Variety Critics have claimed the Comcast-TWC merger, which would create an entity that controls 30 percent of the country’s pay-TV market, is decidedly not in the public interest because it would result in fewer choices and higher prices for consumers. Moreover, the combination “could compromise the open nature of the Internet,” Sen. Al Franken told Justice Department officials last month. CNET Last week, Comcast filed a Hart-Scott-Rodino notification with the U.S. Department of Justice, which will begin the antitrust review of the merger. And on Wednesday, Cohen will testify about the merger before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee. Now that the official filing has been made in the merger, which was announced in February, the FCC will have a self-imposed deadline of 180 days to review and make its decision. USA Today Facing a growing number of customers flocking to streaming video and content providers demanding more payment for programs, TWC agreed in February to be bought by Comcast for $45 billion. The acquisition would give Comcast access to key media markets that it has coveted, including New York and Los Angeles, and occupy about 40 percent of the Internet service market, or about 32 million customers.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Get $25 OFF Freelancing 101 

Freelancing 101Freelancing 101 starts in less than a week! Don't miss your last chance to save $25 on full registration for this online boot camp with code FLANCE25! Starting April 28, this online event will show you the best way to start your freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. Register now! 

Morning Media Newsfeed: AP Journalists Shot | Schultz’s Legal Woes | Blade Sues U.S. Gov’t

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

AP Photographer Killed, Reporter Wounded in Afghanistan (The Associated Press)
An Afghan police commander opened fire Friday on two Associated Press journalists, killing Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Anja Niedringhaus and wounding veteran correspondent Kathy Gannon — the first known case of a security insider attacking journalists in Afghanistan. FishbowlNY Niedringhaus and Gannon were covering the nation’s election when a policeman opened fire on their vehicle. Niedringhaus was killed instantly and Gannon was shot twice and later underwent surgery. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media Niedringhaus and Gannon were traveling in a convoy of election workers delivering ballots from the center of Khost city to the outskirts, in Tani district, protected by the Afghan National Army and Afghan police. As they were sitting in the car waiting for the convoy to move, a unit commander named Naqibullah walked up to the car, yelled “Allahu Akbar” — God is Great — and opened fire on them in the back seat with his AK-47. He then surrendered to the other police and was arrested. BBC News The attack came as Afghanistan intensified security ahead of presidential elections on Saturday, in response to threats of violence by the Taliban. The new president will succeed Hamid Karzai, who has been in power since the 2001 fall of the Taliban but is constitutionally barred from seeking a third consecutive term. The run-up to this historic election had already been the bloodiest, and fears of electoral fraud are pronounced. NYT Niedringhaus, a German citizen who was based in Geneva, first came to Afghanistan after joining the AP in 2002, and she quickly formed a partnership with Gannon. They were among a band of female photographers and correspondents who persevered through many years of conflict in Iraq as well as in Afghanistan. In the process, they helped redefine traditional notions of war reporting. Even as they covered the battlefield, they also focused attention on the human impact of conflicts known for their random, unpredictable violence against civilians.

Read more

AP Photographer Killed, Reporter Wounded in Afghanistan

APLogoAn attack in Eastern Afghanistan on Associated Press journalists left one dead and one wounded, but in stable in condition. Anja Niedringhaus, a photographer for the Associated Press, and Kathy Gannon, most recently an Afghanistan correspondent, were covering the nation’s election when a policeman opened fire on their vehicle. Niedringhaus was killed instantly and Gannon was shot twice and later underwent surgery.

According to the AP, the pair were part of a convoy delivering ballots to areas outside Khost city. When the convoy stopped in what was described as a “heavily guarded district,” a unit commander who was part of the security team protecting the convoy, walked up to the vehicle carrying Niedringhaus and Gannon and fired at the backseat. He then surrendered to the other police.

“Anja and Kathy together have spent years in Afghanistan covering the conflict and the people there,” said the AP’s executive editor, Kathleen Carroll, in a statement. ”Anja was a vibrant, dynamic journalist well-loved for her insightful photographs, her warm heart and joy for life. We are heartbroken at her loss.”

AP Names Deputy Business Editor, AOL Grows Platforms Team

A few moves to note today regarding the Associated Press and AOL. Below are the details.

  • Brad Foss has been promoted from assistant business editor to deputy business editor. Foss joined the AP in 1999. He had been assistant business editor since 2009. He will remain based in Washington, DC.
  • AOL has made two appointments to its AOL Platforms team. Adap.tv co-founder and CEO, Amir Ashkenazi, has been named president of AOL Platforms; and Don Kennedy has been appointed president of Ad.com.

Morning Media Newsfeed: Viacom, Google Settle | KOMO Helicopter Crash | CNN Ratings Surge

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

YouTubeLogo150x150

Viacom, Google Resolve Copyright Lawsuit (MarketWatch)
Google and Viacom jointly announced Tuesday the resolution of the Viacom vs. YouTube copyright litigation. The terms of the settlement were not disclosed. The Associated Press New York-based Viacom filed the $1 billion suit in 2007, claiming that YouTube was aware that thousands of videos on its site were stolen from its TV networks such as Comedy Central, MTV and Nickelodeon. Mashable Viacom later released conversations with Google executives that it claimed showed disregard for copyrights. Google countered that Viacom was uploading its content to YouTube. The case dragged on for years. In 2010, Google’s CFO said the company had spent $100 million on the case. GigaOM The case has been seen as a landmark test of copyright law’s so-called “safe harbor” rules, which can protect website owners from copyright infringement committed by their users. Google won a series of major victories in the case, including last April when a court threw out the case for a second time on the grounds that Google did not have “red flag” knowledge of the infringing shows. The judge had initially dismissed the case in 2010 but an appeals court partially reinstated it, leading to the second dismissal in April. Viacom filed an appeal once again last year, but the sides have now laid the matter to rest, citing a desire for collaboration. LostRemote Before the settlement, Google and Viacom made strides on dealing with piracy. The two companies have inserted filters that flag unauthorized Viacom content and allows the company to take it down from YouTube. SocialTimes Regarding the resolution of this lengthy litigation between them, the two companies made the following statement: “Google and Viacom [Tuesday] jointly announced the resolution of the Viacom vs. YouTube copyright litigation. This settlement reflects the growing collaborative dialogue between our two companies on important opportunities, and we look forward to working more closely together.”

Read more

RIP: AP Entertainment Reporter Bob Thomas

ShutterstockBobThomasStarIn the later stages of his AP career, Bob Thomas was often tasked with reviewing and filing banked obituaries of major Hollywood stars. Today, sadly, it is the job of John Rogers to inform that Thomas has passed at the age of 92.

Over the course of a record-setting journalism career, Thomas covered 66 Academy Awards ceremonies, phoned in from the scene an AP bulletin about the assassination of Senator Robert Kennedy and wrote nearly three dozen books. His entertainment reporting work spanned seven decades, beginning in 1944 and ending in 2010:

Kathleen Carroll, executive editor of the AP, worked with Thomas in the Los Angeles bureau in the early 1980s.

“Bob was an old-fashioned Hollywood reporter and he knew absolutely everyone,” she said. “He had a double-helping of impish charm with the stars, but back at the office, he was the quiet guy who slipped into a desk at the back and poked at the keyboard for a while, then handed in a crisp and knowing story soon delivered to movie fans around the world.”

Read more

AP Removes Photo Depicting Boy’s Group Acting More Bigoted Than Usual

Trail Life is a boy’s group that caters to bigots. It was formed as the answer to the Boy Scout’s announcement that some gays were okay. Trail Life says that no gays are okay. However, a leader of Trail Life was afraid that a recent Associated Press photo — which showed some Trail Life boys displaying the Nazi salute — made his bigoted group look a little too bigoted.

The kids in the photograph certainly look as if they’re praising Hitler, but the reality is that they’re performing a ritual in which they raise their hands, then lower them slowly while singing “Taps.” The AP photographer just happened to catch the kids at the wrong moment.

Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Netflix Soars | AP Bans Photoshopper | Layoffs at TiVo

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

Netflix’s Momentum Continues With 2.33 Million New U.S. Customers in Q4 (The Verge)
Netflix revealed its fourth quarter earnings Wednesday, capping off a banner year that saw the streaming service surpass HBO in subscriber count and earn critical acclaim for its original programming. In Q4, the company handily beat Wall Street expectations with revenue of $1.18 billion and earnings per share of $0.79. During the same period last year (before viewers had streamed a single episode of House of Cards), Netflix earned 13 cents per share on revenue of $945 million. Bloomberg Businessweek Netflix said Wednesday that it expects to sign up another 2.25 million subscribers in the first quarter, with “years of member growth ahead of us,” according to a company letter to shareholders. Netflix shares soared nearly 18 percent in trading after the market’s close, following a 1.5 percent gain to $333.73 in the regular session. NYT The strong growth came even though the service did not add a prominent, exclusive program like the drama House of Cards. One new animated series, TurboFAST, was introduced and the quarter contained the second season of the service’s initial drama series, Lilyhammer. But Netflix did maintain much of its media momentum by being prominently mentioned in award nominations and end-of-the-year best lists. The Guardian Netflix has been experimenting with different subscriber options including different streaming offerings and a lower-priced $6.99 plan for new U.S. customers to get a single stream of standard definition video. On a call with analysts Reed Hastings, chief executive officer, said eventually he would like to have “three simple options to fit everyone’s taste”. He said the company had no plans to run advertising, as does rival Hulu.

Read more

World’s Largest Video Game Collection Started with Cosmic Avenger

CosmicAvengerBuffalo AP writer Carolyn Thompson has a fun look at the 11,607 different ways area resident Michael Thomasson has made it into the Guinness record books. His massive, basement-housed collection has earned him a two-page spread in Guinness World Records 2014 Gamer’s Edition:

Along with the games, Thomasson has the devices to play them on, not only the Xboxes and PlayStations but obscure ones like the Casio Loopy, the only game system specifically geared toward girls, which came out in Japan in 1995, and the Pippin, a dud released by Apple the same year.

“Every game on it is awful,” Thomasson says of Apple’s foray into the gaming world. “It’s the least fun of anything in the house.”

Read more

Reporter Could Always Count on Al Goldstein for ‘Good Quote’

LukeAlpertTwitterProfilePicEven though, as a teen, Lukas I. Alpert (pictured) imagined that Al Goldstein “smelled a bit like the kitchen at the Second Avenue Deli,” a long, indelible partnership would follow his viewings of the Screw magazine publisher’s midnight public access show Midnight Blue.

Alpert, now a Dow Jones/Wall Street Journal reporter based in Moscow, interviewed Goldstein over the years for AP, the New York Daily News and the New York Post. Via a great little Forward Thinking remembrance, Alpert writes that Goldstein could always be counted on for a colorful interview:

Goldstein was one of those guys journalists liked to talk to because, as we say in the newspaper business, “he gave good quote.” I was pleasantly surprised that the prepared obituary I wrote for him at the AP about a decade ago ran all over the country virtually as I had written it.

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>