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Posts Tagged ‘SCOTUSblog’

Morning Media Newsfeed: USA-Portugal Hits Highs | Isikoff Joins Yahoo! News

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18.2 Million Watch USA vs. Portugal, Most-Watched Soccer Match Ever on U.S. TV (TVNewser)
An average of 18.22 million viewers watched the USA tie Portugal (2-2) in World Cup action late Sunday afternoon on ESPN. That’s the most-watched soccer match ever on American TV and surpasses the previous high of 17,975,000 viewers for the 1999 Women’s World Cup final (USA vs. China) on ABC. TVSpy 1.3 million watched on the WatchESPN app. Washington, D.C., led all markets for the telecast with a 13.3 rating. AllFacebook The game resulted in approximately 20 million interactions (posts, comments and likes) by some 10 million Facebook users, according to the Facebook Data Science Team. In the U.S. alone, more than 4 million Facebook users were responsible for more than 7 million interactions related to the match. Financial Times An average of 24.7 million viewers watched Sunday’s performance on either ESPN or Univision, the Spanish-language network whose best football ratings have in the past often been for Mexico matches. Mashable Not only was that an all-time record for a soccer match, it also beat the average viewership for the 2013 World Series by 10 million viewers.

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Food Blogging

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Risen Appeal Rejected | Top Social TV Shows

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Supreme Court Will Not Review Risen Case (The Guardian)
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review a lower court’s order requiring a New York Times reporter to testify in a criminal case against a former source, deepening the court’s silence on the question of protections for journalists and confidential sources. FishbowlDC The issue dates back to a May 2011 subpoena received by James Risen to identify a source for his 2006 book State of War: The Secret History of The CIA and the Bush Administration. NYT The court’s one-line order gave no reasons but effectively sided with the government in a confrontation between what prosecutors said was an imperative to secure evidence in a national security prosecution and what journalists said was an intolerable infringement of press freedom. NPR / The Two-Way Risen has said he would refuse to testify in order to protect the identity of his source. Federal prosecutors argued that they need him to testify to pursue their criminal case against Jeffrey Sterling, a former CIA officer. WSJ A divided U.S. appeals court based in Richmond, Va., sided with the government last year, ruling that Risen didn’t have a reporter’s privilege allowing him to refuse to testify about the source and scope of classified information allegedly disclosed to him. The court said there is no privilege in criminal cases that protects a reporter from testifying about conduct the reporter allegedly witnessed or participated in. USA Today Since Obama took office, federal authorities have filed at least seven leak-related criminal cases, including against former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden for leaks about government surveillance programs and Army Pfc. Bradley Manning for giving classified information to the website Wikileaks.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: ECJ Tackles Web Records | ABC Pitches Brands | FCC Faces Protests

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European Court Lets Users Erase Records on Web (NYT)
Europe’s highest court said on Tuesday that people had the right to influence what the world could learn about them through online searches, a ruling that rejected long-established notions about the free flow of information on the Internet. Poynter / MediaWire If results display pages that are “inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant, or excessive in relation to the purposes for which they were processed and in the light of the time that has elapsed,” the search engine operator must remove them, the court ruled, even if the “publication in itself on those pages is lawful.” BBC News The case was brought by a Spanish man who complained that an auction notice of his repossessed home on Google’s search results infringed his privacy. Google says it does not control data, it only offers links to information freely available on the Internet. It has previously said forcing it to remove data amounts to censorship. WSJ Some lawyers argue that the ruling will probably only be applied for searches done and displayed in Europe, and only for European data subjects, for instance, EU citizens or European residents. The court specifically said, however, that companies can’t get out of compliance simply by saying their servers are outside of Europe. The technology industry has rallied around freedom of speech, long a tenet of Western democracy but enshrined specifically in the U.S. Constitution as its First Amendment. Privacy-rights activists and many European officials have supported a competing notion: the “right to be forgotten.” Reuters The ruling creates technical challenges as well as potential extra costs for companies like Google, the world’s No. 1 search engine, and Facebook. The European Court of Justice (ECJ) said the rights of people whose privacy has been infringed outweighed the general public interest. Google said it was disappointed with the ruling, which contradicted a non-binding opinion from the ECJ’s court adviser last year that said deleting sensitive information from search results would interfere with freedom of expression.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: ABC News, CPI Spar | FNC to Debut Daytime Ensemble | Discovery Drops U.K. Bid

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ABC News Asking Center for Public Integrity to Share Pulitzer Prize (TVNewser)
ABC News is calling on the Center for Public Integrity to share its Pulitzer Prize for investigative journalism, awarded to CPI’s Chris Hamby, taking issue with CPI’s Pulitzer submission that depicts ABC News as a minor partner in a year-long coal-mining industry investigation instead of equal partners. HuffPost Network president Ben Sherwood sent a four-page letter to CPI’s executive director Bill Buzenberg affirming that ABC News was CPI’s partner in the investigation. He argued that reporters Brian Ross and Matthew Mosk made “significant contributions” without which CPI would not have won the Pulitzer. He added that while the prizes are only awarded to print organizations, he hoped the Pulitzer committee would recognize Ross and Mosk. Mediaite In the letter, Sherwood said Buzenberg “omitted the names of ABC News reporters and sought to parse and diminish their contributions, even though their bylines appropriately appear on four of the eight articles submitted by the Center to the committee.” Poynter In response, Buzenberg provided a point-by-point rebuttal saying CPI reporter Chris Hamby was the engine behind the story for months before ABC entered the investigation and in long stretches when ABC was working on other things. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media CPI and ABC News have shared recognition for the black lung benefits story in the past. In March, the Harvard Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting was awarded to Chris Hamby, Ronnie Greene, Jim Morris and Chris Zubak-Skees of CPI and Matthew Mosk, Brian Ross and Rhonda Schwartz of ABC News. Next month, the White House Correspondents’ Association will honor “The Center for Public Integrity, in partnership with ABC News.” On Wednesday, they received an award from the Society of Professional Journalists. Television news organizations are excluded from the Pulitzer Prizes, which honor newspaper and digital reporting.

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SCOTUS Reporters Reveal Feelings About The Biggest Story They’ll Cover All Year

sotomayor hearings.pngFor the past couple days, the network and cable news channels have looked more like CSPAN, thanks to the nonstop coverage of Sonia Sotomayor‘s Supreme Court confirmation hearings. Although the hearings have been rigidly structured, stuffy and sort of dry, there is always something to keep the media watchers watching.

On Monday we sat nervously awaiting new senator and former “SNL” cast member Al Franken’s opening remarks — and they were actually pretty good. And yesterday, we were riveted by Sotomayor’s rapidly blinking eyelids and serious note-taking, and we lost count of the number of times the judge was asked about nunchuks or her “wise Latina” comments.

But after Sotomayor is — seemingly inevitably — confirmed, we will all go back to our regular lives of reading Page Six and watching Kathie Lee drink too much on the “Today” show, while a handful of dedicated reporters who cover the Supreme Court of the United States will continue to track the movements of the High Court and the integration of its new member.

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