AppNewser Appdata 10,000 Words FishbowlNY FishbowlDC TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige SocialTimes

Agents

Sharlene Martin Signs David Schmitz and Jayne Abraham

schmitzOver the holidays, a feel good story made headlines. It went something like this. Brenda Schmitz, who died of terminal cancer in 2011, left a surprise gift for her husband David Schmitz.

Brenda gave two letters to a friend and asked her to mail them to a local radio station in Iowa and in the event that David would remarry. When David got engaged to Jayne Abraham, the friend followed the instructions and mailed her letter to the station. In the letter, Brenda gave her blessing to the marriage. The story went viral, garnering almost 2 million hits on YouTube.

Literary agent Sharlene Martin has signed David Schmitz and Jayne Abraham and will represent the book and film rights to their story.

Mediabistro Course

Get $25 OFF Freelancing 101 

Freelancing 101Freelancing 101 starts in less than a week! Don't miss your last chance to save $25 on full registration for this online boot camp with code FLANCE25! Starting April 28, this online event will show you the best way to start your freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. Register now! 

Agent Brian DeFiore & Editor Yaniv Soha Featured on Humans of New York

1488805_571919219548849_1793262497_n

Humans of New York blogger Brandon Stanton has photographed Yaniv Soha, an editor at St. Martin’s Press, and Brian DeFiore, founder of the DeFiore & Company literary agency.

Stanton shot the picture at Madison Square Park (embedded to the side). The two publishing executives posed with funny hats (provided by Stanton) and copies of the New York Times bestselling Humans of New York book.

In a Facebook comment, Stanton complimented the two men calling them both “great guys and good sports.” He also appreciated that they were “two of the earliest believers in HONY.” We’ve embedded a photo below featuring Stanton with Soha and DeFiore.

Read more

Jack Andraka Has Signed With Martin Literary Agency

jackJack Andraka, a Maryland high school sophomore that invented a low-cost sensor that can detect pancreatic cancer early, has signed with Martin Literary & Media Management.

Andraka invented the technology after a close family friend died of pancreatic cancer. In his research, he discovered that a lack of low-cost early detection led to a low survival rate among people with pancreatic cancer. Andraka’s work won the 2012 grand prize at the Intel International Space and Engineering Fair, which included a $75,000 purse.

Andraka’s work has been widely documented in the media including Morgan Spurlock’s short documentary You Don’t Know Jack, as well as interviews on The Colbert Report and 60 Minutes, and stories in Forbes, Smithsonian Magazine and Popular Science.  Andraka has even given his own Ted Talk.

The sixteen year-old will be represented by Sharlene Martin and Clelia Gore. “We are both thrilled and honored to represent Jack Andraka,” stated Martin in a press release. “He is an inspiration to our youth as well as adults worldwide with his remarkable accomplishments.”

How To Land A Literary Agent: Don’t Bury Your Sales Hook

LiteraryAgentSo the hardest part’s over. You’ve written a book. Congrats! Now, on to a new challenge — selling it. You’ve heard all the self-published success stories, but eBooks and print-on-demand tomes aren’t your thing. You want your writing to be traditionally published. If that’s the case, the first thing you’ll need is a literary agent.

In the latest Mediabistro feature, literary agents give tips for aspiring authors who want to go the traditional publishing route. One thing to remember? Agents and publishers are in the book-selling business, so don’t bury your sales hook:

“As I’m reading [a submission], I’m paying attention to my gut response: Are readers going to enjoy this and want to keep turning the page?” says Rachelle Gardner, an agent with Books & Such Literary Agency. “Then the other side of it is, regardless of my gut response, can I sell this? And could a publisher sell this to readers? And if so, how?” Gardner recommends writers clearly communicate the sales hook in their initial submission. As in, don’t expect the agent to automatically assume that your cozy mystery featuring a stay-at-home mom turned amateur sleuth will be targeted to unfulfilled women in middle America.

To hear more tips on how to get yourself an agent (and a book deal), read: 6 Tips To Land A Literary Agent.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Martin Literary & Media Management Launches Children’s Division

clelia-bio-picMartin Literary & Media Management has opened a new children’s division, helmed by Clelia Gore.

Before working in publishing, Gore practiced law as a corporate litigator in New York City. Since then, she interned at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and Oxford University Press. She also writes a blog about the books she loved as a kid during the 1990s, Tween at 28. Here’s more about the kind of books she seeks:

Clelia is very interested in the emerging New Adult genre. Having faced an early life career crisis, she really relates to characters who are confronted with the challenges of entering adulthood. She is also interested in young adult and middle grade books. She is seeking to represent writers whose protagonists have strong voices and whose plots are original. Clelia never wants to let go of her favorite characters, so she particularly loves trilogies and series that can be adapted to the screen. Clelia has a special spot in her heart for picture books. She especially loves ones that are funny or quirky, ones that feature minority and multi-cultural characters, and ones parents won’t mind reading over and over again to their children.

(Via Aubrey Joy Photography)

Nonfiction Query That Survived 75 Submissions

How many times has your query letter been rejected? Authors Pamela Jane and Deborah Guyol submitted Pride and Prejudice and Kitties 75 times before literary agent James McGinniss decided to represent the book.

We’ve embedded their simple query letter below. Once you find an agent you would like to represent your book, the pitch letter is the next step in the traditional publishing process.

You should also check out our collection of 12 Agent Query Letters That Actually Worked for Nonfiction. If you write fiction, check out our collection of 23 fiction query letter that actually worked.

Read more

Explore the Manuscript Wish Lists of Countless Literary Agents

Hundreds of agents, editors and publishers have shared their manuscript wish lists on Twitter this summer, using the popular MSWL hashtag.

Below, we’ve created a Storify post linking to many of the posts from the hashtag–they are arranged in a massive list, in no particular order. The list is perfect if you are looking for a literary agent or some literary inspiration.

Welcome to our Top Stories of Summer 2013 series. For all our readers returning from trips and vacation reading, we’ve created a short list of the stories you may have missed during this long, strange summer for the publishing industry.

Read more

23 Literary Agent Query Letters That Worked

Once you find an agent you would like to represent your book, the pitch letter is the next step in the traditional publishing process.

Below, we’ve collected 23 different agent pitch letters that actually worked in a variety of genres. We’ve gathered these samples from agency websites, agent blogs and the AgentQuery forums. No matter what kind of novel you have written, they can help you craft a better query letter.

Welcome to our Top Stories of Summer 2013 series. For all our readers returning from trips and vacation reading, we’ve created a short list of the stories you may have missed during this long, strange summer for the publishing industry.

Read more

How Marisha Pessl Found Her Literary Agent

Elle Magazine ran a long profile of Special Topics in Calamity Physics author Marisha Pessl this month.

Pessl has a new book called Night Film coming out on August 20th, and the profile explored how she landed an agent for her debut novel. She would end up with a $615,000 advance for Special Topics in Calamity Physics, according to the article. Check it out:

In 2004, Pessl cold-e-mailed 15 literary agents about her novel, including Susan Golomb, who represents Jonathan Franzen. Golomb was charmed by Pessl’s note—in particular, by her blurbworthy description of her own work: “a funny, encyclopedic and wildly ambitious literary tale about love and loss, youth and yearning, treachery and terror” … In 2008, Pessl left Golomb for superagent Binky Urban, whose agency, ICM, has a strong Hollywood division. (Bret Easton Ellis and Cormac McCarthy are among Urban’s clients.) Then she changed publishers, moving to Random House. “I happened to meet Binky Urban socially, and it just seemed like a very nice fit, the two of us,” Pessl said of the agent who reportedly secured her a $1 million deal for Night Film and a $1.5 million deal for a yet-to-be-written third novel.

Juror B37 Will Not Write a Book

Juror B37 in the George Zimmerman trial will not write a book.

Martin Literary Management president Sharlene Martin posted a statement on Twitter on behalf of her former client. “The best direction for me to go is away from writing any sort of book,” wrote the anonymous juror.  Here is the statement:

I realize it was necessary for our jury to be sequestered in order to protest our verdict from unfair outside influence but that isolation shielded me from the depth of pain that exists among the general public over every aspect of this case. The potential book was always intended to be a respectful observation of the trial from my and my husband’s perspectives solely, and it was to be an observation that our “system” of justice can get so complicated that it creates a conflict with our “spirit” of justice. Now that I am returned to my family and society and general, I have realized that the best direction for me to go is away from writing any sort of book and return instead to my life before I was called to sit on this jury.

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>