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The Fault in Our Stars Named Most Popular Book Within The Twittersphere

tfioscoverBookVibe has examined 80 million Twitter posts from the past 12 months. Quartz reports that the data shows that the most popular book on the Twittersphere is The Fault in Our Stars by John Green.

Green’s hit young adult novel was mentioned in 1.2 million tweets. The books that made it onto the top 10 list are a mix of recently published hit titles and classic icons of literature; several of them have inspired highly successful film adaptations.

According to the article, “recent research suggests that film adaptations of books have the ability to influence people to read, so while critics may bemoan the latest adaptation of a book for the silver screen, the halo effect does increase the book’s readership which, at the end of it all, is exactly what the author wants.” Below, we’ve featured the full top 10 list—what do you think?

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Daniel Handler Contributes $10K to the We Need Diverse Books Crowdfunding Campaign

Daniel Handler 300Daniel Handler incited fury within the literary community for the offensive jokes he made at the recent National Book Awards ceremony. Handler, who served as the master of ceremonies, has publicly expressed remorse for those remarks and found a way to make amends.

Handler (pictured, via) revealed on Twitter that he plans to contribute $10,000 to the We Need Diverse Books Indiegogo campaign. For the next 24 hours, he will match whatever donations come in up to $100,000.

Below, we’ve collected all the tweets that make up Handler’s apology and announcement in a Storify post embedded below. What do you think? (via BuzzFeed)

R.L. Stine Writes a Scary Short Story On Twitter

1257831Goosebumps series author R.L. Stine wrote a scary story called “What’s In My Sandwich?” on Twitter.

Below, we’ve collected all the tweets that make up the short story in a Storify post embedded below—what do you think?

Tomorrow, Stine will unveil another short fiction piece entitled “Let’s Make a Trade” on Wattpad for the “The R.L. Stine Fill In The Fear Contest.” (via BuzzFeed)

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J.K. Rowling’s Anagram Has Been Solved

J.K. Rowling (2)On October 6th, J.K. Rowling created a riddle that ignited a storm of activity on Twitter: “Cry, foe! Run amok! Fa awry! My wand won’t tolerate this nonsense.” Harry Potter fans became obsessed with figuring out the answer. Rowling kept the conversation going by tweeting hints.

More than 24 hours later, Emily Strong (a.k.a. @EmyBemy2) solved Rowling’s anagram; the author named her “The One True Hermione of Twitter.” According to Time, Strong is “a PhD student at the University of Sheffield who regularly updates her own blog and describes herself as a lover of ‘all things Harry Potter’ in her Twitter bio.”

Below, we’ve chronicled the exchange in a Storify post embedded below. What do you think? Read more

Can You Crack J.K. Rowling’s Riddle?

J.K. Rowling (2)Yesterday, J.K. Rowling wrote a post on Twitter about the projects that have kept her busy as of late which include the screenplay for Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. One fan responded to her and confessed that she likes to analyze Rowling’s tweets.

Rowling has since posted a riddle for her fans to dissect: “Cry, foe! Run amok! Fa awry! My wand won’t tolerate this nonsense.” Do you think you can crack Rowling’s riddle?

Below, we’ve chronicled the exchange in a Storify post embedded below. What do you think?

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‘#TeachBannedBooks’ Hashtag Sweeps Twitter

twitterOver the last few days, the #TeachBannedBooks hashtag has swept Twitter. In honor of Banned Books Week, The Huffington Post asked educators to explain why they introduce their students to certain banned books using the social media platform.

Some of the titles mentioned include The Hunger GamesThe Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian (embedded below), and The Giver. What do you think?

 

Twitter Account to Tweet ‘The Great Gatsby’ in Its Entirety

EOAbUp_4_400x400Twitter user @ihatejoemarshal has set out to tweet F. Scott Fitzgerald‘s novel The Great Gatsby in its entirety, 140 characters at a time.

The Twitter account will post a tweet every day for five years. The first tweet went up yesterday.

 

David Mitchell is Publishing His New Short Story Live on Twitter

davidmitchellBritish author David Mitchell is taking to Twitter to publish his latest short story. He began the project today under the hashtag #THERIGHTSORT. You can read the story at this link.

The story is told from the point of view of a boy who is high on his mother’s Valium. “He likes Valium because it reduces the bruising hurly-burly of the world into orderly, bite-sized ‘pulses’. So the boy is essentially thinking and experiencing in Tweets,” Mitchell told The Guardian. “My hope is then that the rationale for deploying Twitter comes from inside the story, rather than it being imposed by me, from outside, as a gimmick.”

Here is an excerpt:

Mitchell is not the first author to experiment with Twitter as a story telling platform.

‘#GoTChildrensBooks’ Hashtag Sweeps Twitter

Over the last few days, the #GoTChildrensBooks hashtag has swept Twitter.

Twitter users re-imagined some of the world’s most beloved children’s books with references from the hit HBO series, Game of Thrones.

Bustle has collected some of the tweets and created a list of “the seven best submissions so far” which include Tyrion and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day (embedded above), Goodnight Moon Door, and Where the Wildlings Are.

Cleis Press Kicks Off OutWriters Project on Twitter

30vOhjvVIndie publisher Cleis Press is celebrating LGBT pride month with a Twitter project that focused on the importance of LGBTQ writing.

The publisher is encouraging writers to share why queer writers are important to them on Twitter with the hashtag #OutWriters.

Here is more from the press release: “Cleis Press’s co-founder Felice Newman commented that ‘as an out writer myself, I’ve spent most of my life encouraging LGBTQ people to be visible, free, and well-pleasured. The presence of LGBTQ voices in literature is dear to my heart.’ Cleis hopes that OutWriters will help give LGBTQ books and writers the attention and visibility they deserve.”

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