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Posts Tagged ‘John Williams’

‘The Curse’ & ‘The Tallest Teacup in the World’: Coming Attractions

crimsonHere are some handpicked titles from our Coming Attractions page. Want to include your book? Just read our Share Your New Book with GalleyCat Readers post for all the details.

The Crimson & The Frost by James Colletti & John Williams: “Billy finds himself in a town full of mystery and wonder, built by the legendary Crimson Wizard and his devoted followers. The residents had lived here in peace for centuries, protected by a powerful magic jewel known as the Heart of Polaris. It is their only defense against the wicked and covetous King of Winter who wants them cast out of the lands he claims are his alone.” (September 2013)

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Mediabistro Course

The Art of the Book Review

The Art of the Book ReviewStarting August 4, learn how to get paid to write reviews that will influence the publishing landscape! Taught by a Publishers Weekly book critic, you'll learn how to recommend a book to its audience, write reviews of varying lengths, tailor a review to a specific publication and more! You'll leave this course with two original reviews and a list of paying markets for book reviews. Register now! 

John Williams To Write ‘Open Book’ Column for NYT Book Review

New York Times senior staff editor John Williams will write a new column for the paper’s Book Review called “Open Book,” providing “a window onto the literary landscape.”

You can also follow Williams on Twitter.

This column will replace the weekly “Up Front” column, but the magazine will include occasional pieces about the magazine’s writers and online material.

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John Williams Hired as Web Producer for NYT Books Section

John Williams, the editor of The Second Pass book review site, has been hired as a web producer at The New York Times books section.

This morning, he tweeted the news: “couldn’t be more thrilled to be the new web producer for the books section of the New York Times.”

Here’s more about the new producer: “Williams, lives in Brooklyn, NY. From 2001-2007, he worked in the editorial department at HarperCollins. Before that, he spent time as a journalist in Texas and an editorial intern at Harper’s Magazine. His work has appeared in the New York Times Book Review, Slate, McSweeney’s, Stop Smiling, the Barnes & Noble Review, the Austin American-Statesman, the Dallas Morning News, and other publications.” (Via Sarah Weinman)

GalleyCat Reviews: Out-of-Print Bookshelf

secondpass.pngTo celebrate the one year anniversary of the online journal The Second Pass, founder John Williams has published short essays by readers, asking them “to recommend their favorite out-of-print book.”

His post reminds us of an often neglected side of book reviewing–helping readers find neglected books. The excellent list includes Killings by Calvin Trillin; Love is the Heart of Everything: Correspondence Between Vladimir Mayakovsky and Lili Brik edited by Bengt Jangfeldt; and Tropisms by Nathalie Sarraute.

Add your suggestions in the comments section. Here’s more from the post: “one of my main goals was to approach reading the way that readers do, not necessarily the way that publishers and even many other reviews do. Publishers naturally want to tell you about what’s new or what’s evergreen. But most readers know the pleasure of somehow discovering and falling in love with a book that has fallen from view. And no status is farther from view than the dreaded ‘out of print.”

Last week, GalleyCat Reviews readers helped Flashlight Worthy Book Recommendations create a list (adding more than 20 suggestions) of the Best Out-of-Print Children’s Books

Book Publishing Made Sweeter The Second Time Around

The Wall Street Journal’s Robert Hughes looks at efforts by two publishers – Persephone Books and New York Review Books – to bring back neglected books into print. NYRB Books, an offshoot of the literary magazine, has published more than 200 adult and 30 children’s titles, most of them reprints. Persephone specializes in novels by women. Among the London company’s most popular releases is 1938′s “Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day” by Winifred Watson, about a governess sent by an employment agency to the wrong address, where she finds a glamorous nightclub singer and helps her through misadventures. The reprint has sold 22,000 copies — exceeding the sales of many well-received new novels today. And “Miss Pettigrew” has spurred a film adaptation starring Frances McDormand set to come out next year.

Reprint publishers, Hughes writes, aren’t under the same pressure to create instant hits as are publishers of new material, says NYRB publisher Rea Hederman. His books often take a year to gather momentum compared with the month or two that bookstores give a new title before they pull it from shelves. Some independent booksellers embrace NYRB’s list. Nancy Olson, owner of Quail Ridge Books & Music in Raleigh, N.C., says her staff recommends John Williams‘s “Stoner” from 1965, about a farmer who becomes a college professor, and has sold 60 copies so far. “They’re not the kind of titles you’ll see pushed in big commercial bookstores,” she says.