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Posts Tagged ‘Richard Ford’

American Author Richard Ford Wins a Top French Literary Prize For ‘Canada’

fordAmerican author Richard Ford has won the Femina Prize, one of France’s top literary awards, for best foreign novel for his book Canada.

The novel is the story of a boy whose parents rob a bank and commit a murder. Here is more about the book from HarperCollins:

After a five-year hiatus, an undisputed American master delivers a haunting and elemental novel about the cataclysm that undoes one teenage boy’s family, and the stark and unforgiving landscape in which he attempts to find grace. A powerful and unforgettable tale of the violence lurking at the heart of the world, Richard Ford’s Canada will resonate long and loud for readers of stark and sweeping novels of American life, from the novels of Cheever and Carver to the works of Philip Roth, Charles Frazier, Richard Russo, and Jonathan Franzen. 

Previously, Ford was awarded  the Pulitzer Prize and Pen/Faulkner Award for his novel Independence Day. (Via France24).

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Timothy Egan & Richard Ford Win Andrew Carnegie Medals

The American Library Association (ALA) named two winners of this year’s Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction.

Richard Ford won the fiction category for CanadaTimothy Egan took the nonfiction category for his biography, Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher: The Epic Life & Immortal Photographs of Edward Curtis.

Each medalist receives $5,000 in prize money. The finalists were each also given $1,500.

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John Williams To Write ‘Open Book’ Column for NYT Book Review

New York Times senior staff editor John Williams will write a new column for the paper’s Book Review called “Open Book,” providing “a window onto the literary landscape.”

You can also follow Williams on Twitter.

This column will replace the weekly “Up Front” column, but the magazine will include occasional pieces about the magazine’s writers and online material.

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Alice Hoffman Regrets “Heat of the Moment” Tweet

hoffman.jpgAuthor Alice Hoffman apologized yesterday for printing critic Roberta Silman‘s telephone number and email address on Twitter (the page has since been removed)–urging her fans to respond to a review of “The Story Sisters” in The Boston Globe.

Her action prompted a stream of responses about author interaction in the age of Twitter. On stranger, somewhat related note, Gawker posted about Richard Ford‘s violent reaction to one of Hoffman’s reviews.

Here’s Hoffman’s apology, via Christian Science Monitor: “I feel this whole situation has been completely blown out of proportion. Of course I was dismayed by Roberta Silman’s review which gave away the plot of the novel, and in the heat of the moment I responded strongly and I wish I hadn’t. I’m sorry if I offended anyone. Reviewers are entitled to their opinions and that’s the name of the game in publishing. I hope my readers understand that I didn’t mean to hurt anyone and I’m truly sorry if I did.”

Scene @ the American Academy of Arts and Letters Annual Ceremonial

ceremonial.jpg

What do Joan Acocella, Paul Auster, David Markson, Don DeLillo, John Updike, William Vollmann, Deborah Eisenberg, Stephen Sondheim, Reynolds Price, Richard Ford, Garrison Keillor, Jim Harrison, Mary Gordon, John Corigliano and many, many more luminaries in the literary, artistic and music worlds have in common? They all sat on the stage at the American Academy of Arts & Letters‘ Annual Ceremonial, held in the organization’s Harlem-area auditorium to honor the best and brightest in the arts. Some, like Gold Medal for Fiction winner Updike, have been members for nearly half a century; others, like Dana Spiotta, Junot Diaz, Tony D’Souza and Adam Rapp, received generous monetary awards honoring their recent writing-related outputs.

It may just be my own biased viewpoint that makes me think the Academy is a well-kept secret within the current state of the arts community, but then, it might not: while the turnout was strong, it was decidedly bereft of publishing professionals and those under the age of 35. And Academy President Ezra Laderman‘s opening remarks, highlighting how “we’re in an extraordinary time for the arts” thanks to questions about intellectual property, the decline of a proper arts curricula in any American school and eschewing artistic endeavors for market forces, had just the barest whiff of the old school. And yet it was remarkably clear how much the Academy, and its members, care about the arts and about ensuring that promising writers and artists continue the non-profit’s legacy, and how old school values produce a certain dignity that’s easy to admire. One need only listen to Updike’s spare remarks about how his induction into the Academy as its then-youngest member helped further his career by exposing him to peers as well as “magi-like writers” whom he revered. Bestowing awards onto Diaz and Spiotta is a step to the future, and I look with interest to see which younger writers the Academy recognizes from here on in.

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