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Posts Tagged ‘Richard Nash’

Kathryn Kuitenbrouwer Wins The Sidney Prize

Author Kathryn Kuitenbrouwer has won the $1,000 Sidney Prize for her short story, “Will You Staunch the Wound?” You can read an excerpt from the story at this link, but the Storyville App will publish the story in April.

Judge Richard Nash explained why he picked the story: “In a world grown increasingly strange, we can no longer rely on what we know since we know so little, so instead we rely on our humanity. Kuitenbrouwer does so with elegance, compassion, and as I realize as I write this, with more rage than first meets the eye.”

The prize is named after New Orleans architect Sidney Story, and rewards “the author of the best new American story.” Kuitenbrouwer is the author of two novels, Perfecting and The Nettle Spinner.  She is a creative writing professor at the University of Toronto and The University of Guelph.

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The Art of the Book Review

The Art of the Book ReviewStarting August 4, learn how to get paid to write reviews that will influence the publishing landscape! Taught by a Publishers Weekly book critic, you'll learn how to recommend a book to its audience, write reviews of varying lengths, tailor a review to a specific publication and more! You'll leave this course with two original reviews and a list of paying markets for book reviews. Register now! 

Richard Nash Introduces Small Demons

In the video embedded above, you can explore Small Demons, a new site that collects and catalogs thousands of references to music, movies, people and objects mentioned inside of books.

As the database grows, you can compare details from your favorite books, visiting one character’s favorite restaurant or listening to the music playing inside a novel. On the Morning Media Menu today (press play below to listen), Small Demons content and community VP Richard Nash showed how the site uses algorithms to connect hundreds of details inside books.

Follow this link if you want to sign up as a beta user on the site. Nash explained: “If you are an author, we are going to create verified author pages. You’re going to be able to add biographical information, information about your own books and other features. You will also get access to the editing tools that we are using to fix the computer’s mistakes. We know algorithms can’t get everything right and even when they get something right, they can’t necessarily provide the nuance that a human being can.”

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Richard Nash: ‘The Community Is the Publisher’

1305037858166_869f2.jpgToday on the Morning Media Menu (MP3 link), Cursor founder Richard Nash introduced his writing community and publisher, Red Lemonade.

The interactive site features free online access to all of Red Lemonade’s published books and allows community members to comment and post their own writing. eBookNewser explored the site yesterday.

Follow this MP3 link to listen. Here’s an excerpt: “As a writer, you can upload your works in progress and get feedback from readers there, just like the published authors at Red Lemonade get response and feedback … it will help us decide what books we will publish next. The community  is our only source of books to publish.”

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Do Digital Review Copies Need DRM Protection?

Should book reviewers be able to share digital review copies with friends? 

Richard Nash‘s Red Lemonade imprint will release its first titles in May, and the publisher (pictured, via) has taken the unusual step of offering his digital review copies without any digital rights management (DRM) restrictions–what do you think of his model?

In an email interview, Nash explained his unconventional policy: “Well, I don’t think consumer books should have DRM, so putting DRM on reviewers’ books is even dumber. I want to make it as easy as possible to get it to you, as easy as possible for you to read it, as easy as possible for you to assign it to a reviewer, as easy as possible for you to send it to a friend.”

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Richard Nash Unveils First Cursor Titles

Publisher Richard Nash has revealed the first three books of Cursor’s publishing imprint, Red Lemonade. Nash founded Cursor with an innovative foundation: offering writers three year licenses on their work, rather than life-of-the-copyright.

The three new titles are: Someday This Will Be Funny by Lynne Tillman (Apr 2011),  Zazen by Vanessa Veselka (pictured, May 2011), and Follow Me Down by Kio Stark (June 2011).  The books will be offered in trade paperback, eBooks in “all forms and channels,” and as a “limited edition artisanal object” from the publisher. The publisher will also resurrect some novels from Tillman’s backlist:  Haunted Houses, Motion Sickness, Cast in Doubt, and No Lease on Life.

The complete release is embedded below. Nash had this statement: “While Cursor’s aim is nothing less than the reinvention of the publishing business model … all publishing begins with the writer, in our case three writers, all women, one an internationally-celebrated novelist, the other two thrilling debuts by writers with long careers ahead of them. They are powerful representatives of the kind of writing Red Lemonade will foster, house, and promote.”

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John Scalzi Defends Ethicist Randy Cohen’s Piracy Stance

underthedome.jpgIn one of the most controversial links ever placed on this site, author Randy Cohen drew the ire of publishers with his weekly NY Times column on ethics. Cohen told a reader it was permissible to illegally download a copy of Under the Dome by Stephen King once they had purchased the hardcover edition of the book.

Earlier this week, novelist John Scalzi defended the column in a long post that has already generated more than one hundred comments. Here’s an excerpt: “Personally I think Cohen is pretty much correct. Speaking for myself (and only for myself), when I put out a book and you buy it for yourself in whatever format you choose to buy it in, the transactional aspect of our relationship is, to my mind, fulfilled. You bought the book once and I got paid once; after that if you get the book in some other format for your own personal use, and I don’t get paid a second time, eh, that’s life.”

The entire essay is worth reading. Add your thoughts in the comments section.

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Richard Nash Channels Tom Waits to Describe the Apple Tablet Experience

richard_nash.jpgFor the last week, eBookNewser has been asking publishing’s brightest minds a simple question: what do you think the Apple Tablet will do for publishing?

Today publishing consultant Richard Nash contributed the most recent installment of “Apple Tablet & Me” (an excellent romantic comedy title, by this editor’s estimation) channeling a hardboiled lounge singer in a song about the mythical device. “The iSlate/iTablet/iRock will help us sing karaoke better, including, for example, the iconic Tom Waits song, ‘Step Right Up, the Apple Shuffle,’ which goes a little something like this…” A lengthy ode to the Tablet follows at eBookNewser.

Here’s Publishers Weekly senior news editor Calvin Reid on the fabled Tablet: “Now I’m not sure that the Tablet will be the be-all device for reading either but certainly a device that offers multiple functions and a high quality UI experience (color, multimedia, web browsing, high res screen) seems closer to what we all think the digital reading experience should be. Or at least what I think it should be.”

Richard Nash: Book Publishing 10 Years in the Future

richard_nash.jpg

Former publisher, Richard Nash has never been one to hold back his voice on how he feels the book publishing industry needs to make dramatic changes.

We asked him what he sees happening in the next 10 years and here is what he had to say:

Richard Nash:
1. Most predictions for 2020 that are not actually wrong will happen by 2015 or sooner.

2. Most predictions for 2020 ungrounded in history will be inadequate.

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“Wizard of Oz” Wins Book of the Year Award

Wizard-of-Oz-300.gifLast week an edition of L. Frank Baum‘s “The Wizard of Oz” re-imagined by artist Graham Rawle won Book of the Year at the 2009 British Book Design and Production Awards.

The UK version of the book was published by Atlantic Books, and Counterpoint/Soft Skull published the American edition. The 352-page book was filled with handcrafted photographs by the artist.

Here’s more from former Counterpoint/Soft Skull Press publisher Richard Nash: “Rawle has stripped the epic story of Dorothy’s journey to Oz of all remnants of Hollywood iconography. Gone are the Judy Garland braids, the Technicolor ruby slippers, the ethereal Glinda the Good Witch. In their place, Rawle has fashioned characters and scenery that are at once relentlessly modern and also devoutly loyal to Baum’s original text.” (Via Richard Nash)

Novel Rises to Top of Fundraising Website

4038104499_d5314bbd0f.jpgIt was an amazingly busy day for publishing news today, so we rounded up a slew of links for your mid-afternoon reading pleasure.

Novelist Robin Sloan has managed to raise more than $12,600 from over 500 backers for his novel–becoming the second most popular project on the fundraising website, Kickstarter.

Last night some of the city’s biggest literary stars competed in a spelling bee to support PEN America.

Over at the Poetry Foundation, poet Eileen Myles interviewed fellow poet CA Conrad with an provocative first sentence: “Sex is problematic.”

Utne Reader named digital publishing advocate Richard Nash one of the “50 Visionaries Who Are Changing Your World.”

Macmillan released a book trailer based on an infamous murder.

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