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Posts Tagged ‘Sara Nelson’

Amazon Names Top 10 Books of the Year So Far

updikeAmazon’s editors have put together a list of the “Best Books of the Year So Far,” a list of titles that have come out over the year so far that Amazon claims is a must-read.

Adam Begley’s Updike took the No. 1 position on the list. We have the entire list with links and descriptions of the books after the jump.

“It’s never easy to narrow down our favorites, but after much debate and discussion, we’ve arrived at a list that will fit every customer’s summer reading agenda—whether you’re headed to the beach, traveling the world or enjoying a stay cation,” stated Sara Nelson, Editorial Director of Print and Kindle Books at Amazon.com. “Updike may seem like an unusual choice for our number one pick, but it’s poised to be one of the best biographies of 2014. It’s a candid, enthralling book that readers won’t be able to put down.”  Read more

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Amazon Chooses ’100 Books to Read in a Lifetime: Mystery & Thriller’

gone girlGone Girl: A Novel by Gillian Flynn; The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown; L.A. Confidential by James Ellroy and The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammet are among Amazon’s list of 100 Books to Read in a Lifetime – the Mystery & Thriller Edition.

The list was put together by Amazon Books’ editorial team. Follow this link to explore their recommendations. You can also check out Amazon’s list of 100 Books to Read in a Lifetime list here.

“There are many different kinds of books that fall under the mystery/thriller umbrella – from police procedurals to murder mysteries to spy thrillers,” explained Sara Nelson, editorial director of Amazon.com in a statement.  ”When we were compiling our list of 100 Mysteries & Thrillers to Read in a Lifetime, we wanted to be sure to include books from all of those sub-categories. The team had plenty of lively arguments, several passionate filibusters, and a number of voting sessions before we came up with the final list.”

 

Amazon Picks 150 Love Stories to Celebrate Valentine’s Day

amazonlovelistAmazon Books has published their top “150 Love Stories for Every Romantic Mood.”

The list has a little something for everyone and has been categorized into a number of different moods including: “Sizzling Series,” “Love on the Big Screen,” “Historical Romance,” “Dystopian Love,” “True Love,” “Unlikely Love,” “Dangerous Love,” “Love Overseas,” “Modern Love,” “First Love,” “Star-Crossed Love,” and “Paranormal Love.”

Sara Nelson, Editorial Director of Books and Kindle, and her team put together the lists. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green; Divergent by Veronica Roth and Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn all made list, along with Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte; The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins; and Still Life With Breadcrumbs by Anna Quindlen. Follow this link to check out the complete list.

Amazon Reveals ’100 Books to Read in a Lifetime’

amazon304Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen; Life After Life by Kate Atkinson; 1984 by George Orwell; Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder, Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Portnoy’s Complaint by Philip Roth, and Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand are among Amazon’s list of 100 Books to Read in a Lifetime.

The book retailer released this list today, and it includes fiction, nonfiction, as well as children’s and YA books. The list was put together by Amazon Books’ editorial team. Follow this link to check out the list.

“With 100 Books to Read in a Lifetime, we set out to build a roadmap of a literary life without making it feel like a homework assignment,” stated Sara Nelson, Editorial Director of Print and Kindle Books at Amazon.com.

Books that didn’t make the list, but that editors wished were there included: Cadillac Desert by Marc Reisner; Full Catastrophe Living by Jon Kabat-Zinn; and The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams.

The Hunger Games Trilogy Is Bestselling Series Ever on Amazon.com

Without revealing sales figures, Amazon announced today that The Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins is the bestselling book series of all time on Amazon.com. The seven-book Harry Potter series was previously held this record, calculated by combining print and Kindle eBook sales.

Sara Nelson, editorial director of books and Kindle at Amazon.com, stated.: “Interestingly, this series is only three books versus Harry Potter’s seven, and to achieve this result in just four years is a great testament to both the popularity of the work and, we think, the growth in reading digitally during that time. Customers love these books and all three titles are consistently on our Top 10 lists in both print and Kindle formats, and ‘The Hunger Games’ is also the most-borrowed book in the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library.”

Sales for the Scholastic series have been so high that competing publisher Penguin blamed The Hunger Games for its revenue drop this year. For readers who enjoyed the series, the Lawrence Public Library in Kansas has compiled a flowchart to help find new books to read.

Revolving Door News: Sara Nelson, Parul Sehgal & Mary Kole

A number of publishing professionals have announced big job changes today.

Sara Nelson (pictured, via) is leaving O, The Oprah Magazine to serve as editorial director at Amazon.com Books. Publishers Weekly had the scoop: “A spokesperson for Amazon said Nelson ‘will be leading our editorial vision for books in the print and Kindle bookstores on Amazon.com.’”

Parul Sehgal will be a new preview editor at The New York Times Book Review.

Read more

Sara Nelson Blames Journalists and Publishers for High Advances

sara_nelson_0.jpgIn a recent interview, O Magazine books director and former Publishers Weekly editor Sara Nelson blamed both journalists and publishers for pushing author advances to destructively high sums over the last few years.

Here’s an excerpt from her interview, conducted by Christopher Kenneally from Beyond the Book: “it’s only in the last, maybe, 50 years–or not even–in this country, that we think that one has a full-time profession as a writer that supports you and sends your children to private school. That has never been the norm,” she explained.

Nelson concluded: “I think part of the reason for that is writing programs, which I think are in many ways great. I take some responsibility for it, as the former editor of Publishers Weekly, because we would run articles about people who got $500,000 advances for books of short stories. And then everybody thought they were supposed to get $500,000 advances.” The whole interview is archived at the Copyright Clearance Center. (Image via wowOwow)

Dan Brown and Publishing’s “DBDay”

the_lost_symbol-1.jpgWith 6.5 million copies of Dan Brown‘s “The Lost Symbol” coming out on September 15, publishing folks are looking towards what some call “DBDay” with a mixture of anticipation and fear.

Former Publishers Weekly editor Sara Nelson interviewed a number of publishing types for The Daily Beast, giving an inside glimpse at expectations for the novel. Thriller author Joseph Finder worried that the book will influence his sales, and Nelson projected that other writers “prefer to scuttle like cockroaches” than face Brown’s book on the bestseller list.

Here’s an excerpt from the essay: “[I]f I were ‘Into the Wild’ author Jon Krakauer, whose long-awaited book about Pat Tillman, ‘Where Men Win Glory,’ is slated for the same pub date, I might be a little anxious about the fact that my publisher Doubleday has been so preoccupied with their ‘star project’ that at least one wag has already dubbed them DBDay. Still, publishers insist, there is plenty of in-house marketing muscle to go around.”

Sara Nelson Defends Salinger Follow-Up

salingerbook.jpgFormer Publishers Weekly editor Sara Nelson has joined the legal fight against J.D. Salinger‘s efforts to block the publication of “60 Years Later–Coming Through the Rye.” UPDATE: On her Twitter feed, Nelson adds this comment: “For the record, I did not ‘join’ the anti-Salinger camp — just don’t think this book will hurt ['The Catcher in the Rye'].”

Yesterday the publishing reporter filed a declaration as an expert literary witness in the defense of author John David California (a pseudonym for author Fredrik Colting), Windupbird Publishing and SCB Distributors–the parties sued by Salinger to block 60 Years, a “critical analysis” that revisits the author’s classic novel, “The Catcher in the Rye.” The law firm of Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz argue that Salinger’s legal team cannot prove “commercial harm” will result from the book, filing expert testimony from Nelson and two literature professors.

Here’s an excerpt from Nelson’s expert testimony: “Through my experience covering the publishing industry as a reporter and an editor, I understand the myriad variables that contribute to–or detract from–a book’s commercial success … 60 Years will have no detrimental impact on sales of Catcher … Anticipated sales of 60 Years, a critical analysis by a little-known author, pale in comparison to Catcher’s success … It is more likely that 60 Years, through its critical content and the attendant publicity it will likely generate, will actually contribute to renewed interest in, discussion of, and consequently sales of, Catcher.”

It Seems Some Woman Wrote a Novel About Muhammad’s Wife

sherry-jones-medina.jpgSince Michelle Boorstein is the religion correspondent for the Washington Post, and doesn’t usually cover the book beat, it’s understandable that today’s recap of the Jewel of Medina controversy doesn’t reference any of GalleyCat‘s extensive commentary from the last two weeks on Random House‘s decision to not publish the novel Sherry Jones wrote because they didn’t want to risk the possibility of terrorist reprisals, even when it attempts to describe the sentiments of “publishing insiders” by only quoting one person who doesn’t work for Random: Sara Nelson.

But identifying Nelson as “a blogger for Publishers Weekly“? That’s not good. So not good.

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