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Posts Tagged ‘Shelf Awareness’

Indie Booksellers Choice Awards Shortlist Revealed

The shortlist for the first annual Indie Booksellers Choice Awards has been revealed. The grand prize winners will receive a group display in independent bookstores across the country.

Melville House and Shelf Awareness co-sponsored the awards. Below, we’ve collected the full shortlist.

Participating booksellers can cast votes until May 20th to choose five grand prize winners. According to the press release, the winners will be announced on May 23rd at a ceremony in Housing Works Bookstore Cafe. The event will be hosted by comedian David Rees.

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Bethanne Patrick Joins Shelf Awareness

Bethanne Patrick (pictured, via) has joined Shelf Awareness.  According to the publishing site, Patrick will serve as “editor of our upcoming consumer publication.”

We reached out to the site, but no more details were offered about the new publication. Patrick is known as The Book Maven on Twitter and has written two books for National Geographic. Her book reviews have appeared in a number of publications, including O the Oprah Magazine and The Washington Post.

Here’s more from Shelf Awareness: “From 2008 until early 2011, Bethanne hosted The Book Studio for WETA-PBS, an online author interview show. She was a contributing editor to Publishers Weekly, editor of AOL Books from 2004-2007 and from 2001-2004 was an editor for Pages magazine, where she wrote the ‘Global View’ column.”

Authors Get Filmic for Powell’s

The New York Times’ Julie Bosman picks up on a story Shelf Awareness featured earlier this month about Powell’s new series of short films featuring authors, to be shown at their bookstores, movie-premiere style. Ian McEwan is the star of the first “Out of the Book” film, which is planned to run 23 minutes and will feature snippets from an on-camera interview with McEwan, as well as commentary from peers, fans and critics. In essence, this film virtually replaces the standard book tour as he won’t be making in-bookstore appearances for his upcoming novel ON CHESIL BEACH.

Powell’s has enlisted Doug Biro, a former creative director at RCA Records and music video director, to direct the first film. It will have its debut on June 1 in Manhattan during BookExpo America, a widely attended annual gathering of publishers, booksellers and authors.

Hudson Booksellers Keeps O’Hare Contract

Shelf Awareness points to this Chicago Sun-Times article about the end of a bidding war for concession space at O’Hare Airport – the first open competition in a decade. Hudson Booksellers, the incumbent, won out over other competitors in getting a seven year extension. But the competition is crying foul, he way the bid was structured gave Hudson the inside track.

Instead of inviting competition by dividing the news and gift shop concession into smaller, more manageable bites, the Daley administration put all 25 locations into a single package against the advice of its concessions manager. Together, those 15 stores and 10 kiosks generate $41.3 million in annual revenues. “One company can win: the incumbent. It stinks so bad, it’s unbelievable,” a competitor, who asked to remain anonymous, told the Chicago Sun-Times when the competition began nearly a year ago. But Aviation Commissioner Nuria Fernandez argued that Hudson’s contract was “not a renewal, truly” because the company bought out W.H. Smith in December 2003. “Hudson has now competed based on their own merits and they were the highest bid. So, we’ve selected them” from a field of six, she said.

Today in AMS: “Transition Vendor” and Pressure on Non-Consentings

Today is a special day in the annals of publishing, as it is technically the last day of Publishers Group West‘s existence. Tomorrow the company will be known as Transition Vendor, and the switch of many publishers to distribution by Perseus formally begins, reports Shelf Awareness. It’s the most obvious sign of the “second phase” of bankruptcy discussed in this week’s Publishers Weekly, and how the weekly checks from Perseus will stop as the 70 cents on the dollar plan goes into effect – and publishers must get used to waiting up to 3 months for future payment.

Soft Skull‘s Richard Nash was the only publisher contacted by PW who said that the bankruptcy will definitely force him to delay some titles, although some others were not yet sure about what they will do for the rest of the year. “We’ll be doing triage on what books need to be published and which can wait,” Nash said.

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Pleasant Distribution Switches Are, In Fact, Possible

Even as the AMS/PGW fallout continues, Shelf Awareness reminds us that small presses can switch distribution companies amicably and lacking the slightest hint of drama. Effective June 1, McBooks Press of Ithaca, N.Y., will be distributed by Independent Publishers Group. The 27 year old publishing house, best known for its historical fiction, especially nautical fiction, has been with National Book Network since 2002. McBooks Press president Alex Skutt praised both IPG–”for its effective sales and operations, its excellent personnel, its financial stability and the help and advice with which it provides its clients”–and NBN, from whom the company is leaving “on the best of terms. They have done a fine job for us and were particularly helpful to McBooks Press when we were impacted by the 2002 demise of LPC Group.”

Today in AMS: PGW publisher options, legal issues

As Advanced Marketing Services‘s Chapter 11 adventures continue (with the top 20 creditors slated to meet on January 12 to discuss what to do next) attention still rightfully swirls around the future of once-profitable Publishers Group West and the 150-odd independent publishers who are its clients. Last Friday, more than 70 publishers discussed their options in a conference call and expressed support for taking collective action to promote PGW publishers’ interests. As a result, there’s a movement afoot to create an Ad Hoc Committee of PGW Publishers which will petition the bankruptcy court to appoint a separate creditors committee composed of PGW publishers to represent their interests.

The must do so because, as Shelf Awareness reports, some of their worst fears were confirmed on Friday after legal consultations: Their books in PGW’s possession are considered on consignment and are the property of PGW. Reclamation rights are limited. In the same vein, it will be very difficult for publishers to get out of the contracts with PGW, which means that the last three months of earnings will remain in limbo for an indefinite period of time, with limited (if any) access to the funds.

No wonder a rogue blog called Radio PGW has popped up to provide some dark humor in dark times, signing off today’s flurry of posts with “from the killing fields of America’s publishing industry–good day and good luck.”

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Further AMS Bankruptcy Updates

The New York Times finally picks up the Advanced Marketing Services bankruptcy story (what took so long?) and provides an overview of why this is big news in the publishing industry. “This is a huge disruption in this business,” said a publishing executive to Julie Bosman, who declined to be further identified because he was not authorized to speak for his company. “The publishers are going to end up taking a big loss.”

But Shelf Awareness reports some good news on the PGW front. Yesterday the distributor indicated that key accounts, including Amazon, Ingram, Barnes & Noble, Baker & Taylor , Bookazine, Books-A-Million, Borders, Costco and “myriad indies,” have expressed their support and will “treat their ordering and return patterns as business as usual.” In addition, PGW president Rich Freese wrote to publishers saying that the AMS bankruptcy court had approved payments to publishers for books that shipped or will ship on or after December 29. Checks for gross sales for the first week after December 29 should go out next Monday. PGW will send checks on a weekly basis for the time being.

The biggest irony of the AMS bankruptcy? PGW had a great 2006 as ynit sales rose 3% to 11.2 million, gross sales grew 2.2% to $187.3 million, net sales were up 5.5% to $138.6 million, and returns dropped 6.1% to slightly under 26%. “Last Thursday, PGW was having its best year ever. Now it’s teetering on the edge,” said one disbelieving publisher.