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Mona Zhang

Mona is the editor of SocialTimes and social media coordinator at Mediabistro. She graduated from New York University with a degree in journalism and East Asian Studies. Before moving to NYC, she lived in Beijing, London, Madrid and Chicago.

‘Big Brands are Coming to the Millennial Game Late’

At TV Week in New York City, MediabistroTV talked to the heads of a couple new TV networks aimed at millennials. Though the thought of starting a new TV network for the generation that famously eschews traditional media seems a little ill-advised, it’s not like brands have this whole millennial thing down either. So what can PR pros learn from these media upstarts about their target demo? “A number of big brands are coming to the millennial game late,” said Evan Shapiro, president of Pivot. “There’s a misperception that [millennials] don’t care about anything but themselves. That’s absolutely incorrect.”

JET EIC to Publicists: ‘It’s about how you pitch’

Launched in 1951 as the authority on breaking information in the black community, JET has a loyal readership of over 7 million and covers everything from sports and politics to lifestyle and fashion. All sections are open to PR pitches; just make sure you study the pub and are familiar with the tone and the types of stories that the magazine covers.

“It’s a full-service publication. Pitch your clients. Pitch your products. It’s about how you pitch. There’s nothing that we’re not covering right now,” said editor-in-chief Mitzi Miller. Content has always covered an array of topics, but it’s just a matter of making sure you’re pitching to the right person and that the pitch is customized. A blanketed, mass-mailed pitch without a specific feel for the magazine’s audience or style is guaranteed to get ignored.

For more details and a list of editors’ contact info, read How To Pitch: JET.

ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register  now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Pitch Your Food Clients to Every Day With Rachael Ray

Ever since Rachael Ray first hit the culinary scene as Food Network’s pint-sized, quick-cooking aficionado, women have been tuning in by the millions and clamoring to whip up their own 30-minute meals. Now Ray is a certified brand, with a slew of extensions, including cookbooks, a daytime talk show, a line of premium dog food and, of course, her lifestyle magazine, Every Day With Rachael Ray.

The mag accepts publicist pitches, a good thing for PR pros looking to reach its 1.7 million-plus circulation. Just make sure you familiarize yourself with the pub first — everything from products to celebrities featured in the mag must fit a certain mold.

For pitching etiquette and editors’ contact info, read How To Pitch: Every Day With Rachael Ray.
ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Pitch Your Environmentally-Savvy Clients to Audubon

Audubon, one of the oldest continuously published magazines in the country, has been harvesting some of the best earth-minded writing for more than a century. The pub appeals to the well educated, politically active nature lover.

Though the mag is the only pure nature magazine on the market, EIC David Seideman admits that the publication aspires to the reach and commercial success of National Geographic, while still maintaining its commitment to the thought-provoking, long-form type journalism of The Atlantic and The New Yorker.

And, lucky for publicists, editors are more than open to featuring your clients as long as they fit the pub’s nature-loving mission. Get the details on who and what to pitch in How To Pitch: Audubon.

ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

How to Pitch Your Clients to O Magazine

The queen of media’s eponymous mag boasts 14 million readers and has numerous accolades to its credit.  After launching in 2000 through a partnership with Hearst, the pub has earned a dozen ASME nods and has become the go-to resource encouraging “confident, intelligent women to reach for their dreams and make choices that will lead to happier and more fulfilling lives.”

We’ve said it before with other mags, and, it remains the same with O: Know thy market. Start by picking up a couple (or 10) past issues to get a feel for the magazine and the types of stories that typically run. According to the editors we spoke with, they do accept PR pitches — but they must be on target.

For editors contact info and more specifics, read How To Pitch: O, The Oprah Magazine. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

PR Pitches Are Always Welcome at Girls’ Life

When EIC and publisher of Girls’ Life Karen Bokram was working for Seventeen, she approached her boss to suggest that the magazine add a section for younger teens. Many girls younger than the pub’s targeted audience wrote in, but the EIC wasn’t into the idea. “We make magazines for advertisers, not readers,” she said.

So Bokram struck out on her own, and founded the tween mag Girl’s Life, which has been going strong for almost 20 years. Luckily for her, advertisers have realized what a potent economic force tweens are, and she has no problem getting them to work with the pub. PR pros are also welcome to pitch their clients to the magazine as long as they make sense for the pub’s audience. “Anti-aging cream — not for us,” said Bokram.

For editors’ contact info and details on the most PR-friendly sections, read How To Pitch: Girls’ Life. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

Pitch Your ‘Weird’ Clients to Inked

When it comes to publicist pitches, “I’m down for any subject: the weirder, the better,” says Inked editor Rocky Rakovic.

The lifestyle pub, which Rakovic describes as “the outsider’s insider,” goes beyond the world of tattoos in its coverage: fashion, booze, cars and art all find their way into the pages of the mag. “Just think of us sort of like a Maxim [except] everyone in the magazine has tattoos, so it’s like Maxim plus tattoos, minus the articles that they do [on] the very ‘clean’ men’s lifestyle,” he said.

For more details and editors’ contact info, read How To Pitch: Inked. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

Pitch Products to Running Times

For years, Running Times‘ closest competition was Runner’s World, another book that covers the world of runners with industry trends and service pieces. However, Running Times sets itself apart by being the go-to resource for more experienced athletes.

“We’re like taking the senior-level course rather than Running 101,” said editor-in-chief Jonathan Beverly.

The section of the book that is most ripe for PR pitches is “Gear and Trail.” Think your product or client would fit well there?

Get advice for PR pitching, plus a full list of editors’ contact info in How To Pitch: Running Times. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

How to Get Your Clients Featured in New York

Ever since it started out as an insert in the New York Herald-Tribune, New York magazine has made a name for itself as the trusted confidante of the city’s most knowing readers.

And editorial director Jared Hohlt has some great advice if you’re looking to pitch your clients to the pub. “Publicists should note that we are not restricted to ‘New York area-only’ profiles,” he explained. “If we are doing a profile of someone, we do want to make sure that our competitors aren’t doing the same sort of piece at the same time, but that kind of goes without saying.”  

Get more details and editors’ contact info in How To Pitch: New York. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

Pitch Fashion and Beauty Clients to Marie Claire

With a total readership of 3.8 million, Marie Claire offers a compelling and unpredictable mix of articles underscored with wit and attitude. Its readers are as passionate about human rights around the world as they are about the latest fashion trends to hit the runway, so there are many clients a PR pro could pitch to the mag.

Of course, fashion and beauty pitches are welcome, but publicists can also pitch stories about politics, women in the news and human rights. When pitching, keep in mind that the magazine plans issues several months in advance, so when it’s winter, think spring!

For more details and editors’ contact info, read How To Pitch: Marie Claire. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

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