TVNewser Show TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Fashion

More Online Fashion Brands Eyeing Retail Stores as Core to their Business Models

Warby Parker Store UES Window Final“We’re trying to blend both worlds so they complement each other”, said Tim Riley, director of online experience at eyewear brand Warby Parker. He spoke on a panel recently about web-based fashion companies at FIAF (French Institute/Alliance Francaise). Warby Parker is one of a number of fashion brands in the post-startup phase that’s ventured into retail space. Another panelist, Mollie Chen, editorial director of Birchbox, said the beauty products packager is planning to open its first store in SoHo.

Digital-only brands have long been perceived as more cost-effective since they don’t need to pay steep expenses for designing and maintaining posh locales and sales staff. But internet-based companies have found that online-only doesn’t work for all categories. The in-person experience also adds a valuable dimension, forming a holistic customer relationship.

These two brands tested the waters first before investing in retail locations.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Storytelling for Media Professionals

Storytelling for Media ProfessionalsStarting April 22, this in-person workshop will teach you the specific ways to incorporate storytelling into your personal and professional life. Students will examine the role of storytelling in business and put their newfound skills into practice with a series of improvisation, writing, and presentation exercises designed to help them uncover personal stories. Register now! 

President Obama Stuck in the 80s, Causing Serious PR Issues for BlackBerry

breakfast club

Coming to a White House near you.

By now, if you have any inkling of interest in politics, you have discovered the one thing that sets President Obama apart from all other gentlemen of his ilk — his serious embrace of the greatest decade in the history of ever. Of course, I’m referring to the 1980s.

This school of thought first became popular during the final presidential debate of 2012 — Obama V. Romney: This boring crap is getting personal! The famous quip was over foreign policy and Romney hearkening back to a better day of the Cold War. To wit, Obama replied, “The 1980s are calling and they want their foreign policy back.”

Well, thanks to his choice in outdated fashion and technology, the president may be causing bad PR too.

Read more

Vanessa Freidman Is Your New York Times Fashion Critic

vanessa-friedman-225The search is over: The New York Times has named Vanessa Freidman, currently chief fashion critic at Financial Times, as its new arbiter of all things style.

This announcement, of course, follows the January resignation of longtime fashion chief Cathy Horyn, who left the paper for personal reasons, and the more recent departure of fellow critic Suzy Menkes, who departed the recently rebranded International New York Times for a a spot at Vogue.

Times executive editor Jill Abramson says:

“I’m thrilled to welcome Vanessa to the Times.  She is the perfect journalist to be our leading voice on global fashion.”

Read more

Ogilvy & Mather Signs Tiffany & Co.

tiffany-and-co-torontos-tiffanybloor-004This morning Ad Age scooped the news that Tiffany & Co.’s global agency search is over: Ogilvy & Mather will serve as its creative AOR.

Reports focus on the traditional advertising aspects of the deal, which follows the company’s appointment of a new design director and a third quarter marked by rising sales around the world. The news is made more significant by the fact that Tiffany’s famously keeps most of its operations in-house, and our sister site AgencySpy notes that Ogilvy will handle print, video and digital “in tandem with the latter’s in-house marketing team”; Ogilvy CMO Lauren Crampsie told Ad Age “we are honored to be selected as [Tiffany's] trusted marketing partner.”

The move will inevitably affect PR as well, though: pending challenges include familiarizing new markets with the Tiffany name and helping the brand continue its vigorous defense of its own intellectual property rights (which famously include its own trademarked color).

In other words, there will be quite a bit of communications work ahead for everyone associated with one of the world’s best-known fashion names.

Industry Vets Share Their Tips on Breaking Into Fashion PR

fashion-PR-article

Working with star designers, hobnobbing with celebrities: working in fashion PR sounds like a dream for anyone obsessed with all things couture. But jump-starting your career in this industry takes persistence, passion and talent.

Scoring a coveted internship is an essential first step for anyone seriously interested in a career in fashion PR. But you’ll need to do more than just clock in and out: ”The interns and employees who stand out to me are the ones who say, ‘I finished that project faster than I thought. Can I help you with something else?’ says Melissa Duren, an independent publicist. Also, always make sure your expectations (and attitude) are in check:

[Cindy Capobianco, founder and CEO of LA's Capobianco & Associates] warns aspiring fashion pros that everything is not always as it seems: “I think there is a misperception that because fashion editors and publicists are beautifully dressed and have all sorts of access to exclusive events and ‘A-list experiences’ that they’re not working hard — but it is incredibly hard work. At the end of the day it’s less about where you work than how you conduct yourself.” Attitudes matter too: “I don’t like the condescension often associated with fashion. I want our interns to reflect our company culture: no divas here,” she said.

To hear more about fashion PR, including tips on applying for a job, read: How To Break Into Fashion PR.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

STUDY: Lululemon’s Success Lies in Making Its Customers Feel Bad

shutterstock_138566354

Why can’t you do this?!

Speaking of “unapologetic” Barbie, observers have long argued that apparel and beauty brands play on their consumers’ own insecurities to move products—and research now confirms that it’s all true (surprise surprise).

The study in question, performed by the Canadian Review of Sociology, concluded that Lululemon and other “aspirational” brands succeed on the psychological level by “promoting a philosophy that blames people if their lives aren’t fabulous”—a philosophy that reaches directly into your wallet.

Read more

Desigual Clothing Brand Reflects Barcelona’s Sunny Spirit

desigual-logo-3“Our runway models are dancing and they’re not serious like they’re at a funeral, as are many models from other fashion brands”, said Borja Castresana, director of global marketing and communications at Desigual, a casual clothing line from Spain. His comment cut to the core of the brand’s positioning statement, “La vida es chula”, translated as “Life is cool.”

Castresana spoke during a Museum at FIT/Fashion Institute of Technology panel on Tuesday about Desigual and how the brand serves as an emblem for Barcelona where it’s based. Both the city and the brand convey similarly positive dispositions. As Spanish trends expert and author Gema Requena said, “the city as brand concept is key for competing in global markets.”

Read more

Valentino PR Apologizes for Using Pics from Philip Seymour Hoffman’s Wake

shutterstock_174754715

When a Page Six headline calls you “appalling”, it may be time to think about what you’ve done.

Unfortunately, fashion PR is to blame for the most classless response to Philip Seymour Hoffman‘s death; not one but two big-name brands used the actor’s recent New York wake as an chance to promote their own products.

We hoped Gawker‘s “Fashion Label Uses Wake As PR Opp” headline was just more clickbait, but a “celebrity relations manager” at Valentino did indeed spam journalists with pictures of Amy Adams carrying one of the brand’s bags to Hoffman’s ceremony last week in Manhattan (along with an official promo for the bag).

Read more

WWD Keeps It Glassy for New York Fashion Week

You know, we really doubted Google Glass there for a minute.

Somehow, the world’s nerdiest eyewear continues to score media wins: the latest is the news, announced this morning, that WWD will include a “Glass Menagerie” in its New York Fashion Week coverage. What does that mean? Here’s your answer:

WWD isn’t just highlighting Glass, either.

Read more

Top New York Times Fashion Critic Resigns

t-logo-190This morning brought big news for everyone in fashion PR: Cathy Horyn will step down as The New York Times‘ chief fashion critic after more than 15 years in the position, effective immediately.

As Capital New York reports, Horyn “occupied one of the fashion industry’s true critical pulpits” but was not always a favorite among the design community due to her propensity for brutal honesty in reviewing designers’ newest collections and personal comments about designers themselves; Giorgio Armani and Yves Saint Laurent famously banned her from their shows.

On a somber note, the given reason for this last-minute announcement is the illness of Horyn’s partner, former Liz Claiborne executive Art Ortenberg.

Notes from the memo just released by Times executive editor Jill Abramson and styles editor Stuart Emmrich after the jump:

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>