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Fashion/Beauty

Real-Life Barbie Doll Wants to Become Living Blonde Stereotype

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Please send your hate mail to this bimbo … if she can read it.

Meet Blondie Bennett.

Certainly, that’s her legal name, or at least one that she can spell without phoning a friend. This 38-year-old nimrod has one idol that challenges her to reach for goals, climb to new heights, and become a better person. That idol is Barbie.

Yes, as in the plastic doll that recently posed on the cover of Sports Illustrated and known for having an unrealistic body. So, other than the alterations that you can see has already taken place, she plans on doing this — Blondie Bennett wants to become “totally brainless through the practice of hypnotherapy.”

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‘Unapologetic’ Barbie to Appear in Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue

Embargoed_Barbie_2014_Actual_SI_Spread_Image_2.11.14In a world in which ad campaigns are making headlines for saying “no” to Photoshop and some brands are committing to embracing broader, more realistic standards of beauty, others make no apologies in the face of many years of criticism for promoting unattainable, unrealistic ideals. So, we guess it’s about time two of those brands team up and defiantly, proudly, (bravely!) refuse to change. Or apologize. Together.

Aw, solidarity. How sweet.

A new campaign for Barbie will find the doll posing for her very own spread in the upcoming 50th installment of the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue, along with the tagline “Unapologetic.” The magazine will also be bringing back other Swimsuit “legends” to celebrate its 50th issue.

Now check out what a Mattel spokeswoman said about the campaign:

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WWD Keeps It Glassy for New York Fashion Week

You know, we really doubted Google Glass there for a minute.

Somehow, the world’s nerdiest eyewear continues to score media wins: the latest is the news, announced this morning, that WWD will include a “Glass Menagerie” in its New York Fashion Week coverage. What does that mean? Here’s your answer:

WWD isn’t just highlighting Glass, either.

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Aerie Commits to Photoshop-Free Lingerie Ads, Draws Mixed Reactions

aerie-0Every time I scroll through the Victoria’s Secret website on the hunt for a new bra or a pair of yoga pants, I feel a wider range of mixed emotions than should ever accompany the purchase of anything but a pregnancy test.

After somewhat unwillingly feasting my eyes on the ridiculously retouched images that were once, presumably, pictures of human beings, I feel disgusted by a culture that so drastically alters women’s bodies to sell fashion; I feel ashamed that I am supporting this concept by buying the damn yoga pants; and I feel a certain maniacal glee that results in out-loud laughter at how absurd some of the particularly horrendous botch jobs are–clearly-missing ribs, grotesquely-stretched legs and necks, and, sometimes, body parts that don’t even seem to connect to each other.

By the end of my transaction, however, I sigh with a sense of heavy acceptance that this is “just how it is,” and then feel a bit angry and guilty about that acceptance.

All just to buy some underwear.

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Pretty Little Liars Actress Publicly Blasts Overly-Airbrushed Promotional Image of Herself

article-2522370-1A0CA5E700000578-187_638x628You will be shocked, gentle readers, to learn that Kim Kardashian‘s latest “my body is back” bikini pic campaign was airbrushed into oblivion after “taken in secret by a friendly agency photographer.”

The over-altering of women’s bodies in magazine and advertisement images is an issue that’s been raging for years; papers, documentaries and conferences have been based on the subject, and we’re all aware of the unattainable ideal such blending and stretching and trimming creates. No one, not even the celebs and models in the photos, look like the glossy, pore-less, gravity-defying humanoids constantly bombarding our eyeballs.

Yet, while we laypeople all complain about it, it’s fairly rare (and particularly awesome) when a celebrity becomes majorly and publicly outraged by their own bodies being altered beyond reason. (Kate Winslet is still my hero for shaming Cosmo when it plastered a super-slimmed-down version of her on its cover –  “I don’t look like that,” she famously said, “and I don’t desire to look like that.”)

Now, Ashley Benson, star of ABC Family’s hit show Pretty Little Liars, who took to Twitter earlier this week to publicly bash a heavily Photoshopped image of her and her co-stars, is sending a similarly powerful and honest message to her young fans.

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Panty Raid on North Korea by Swedish Lingerie Company

panty raidAh, remember the days, fellas? You go to camp, sneak out of the cabin and find that one unsuspecting cabin off in the distance. The next morning, there they are — bloomers hanging on the flagpole rippling in the wind. God bless America, indeed.

Well, thanks to a story in Time magazine, this stunt of prepubescent immaturity could start World War III.

Ripped from the press release: A Swedish underwear company announced Tuesday that it recently “love bombed” North Korea with “weapons of mass seduction” in the form of 450 pairs of hot pink underwear, a move that is ever-so-slightly tone deaf given the country’s escalating issues with sex trafficking.

Yes, kids. That’s real.

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Top Fashion Journalist Says the Hack/Flack Game Has Changed

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“Whenever John Fairchild, the legendary god of Fairchild Publications, was asked for his own job description, his answer proved quick and succinct: ‘I’m a reporter.’”

It’s not like that anymore, though—at least not according to this WWD report on publicists behaving…differently.

Fashion journalist Bridget Foley writes that brands in her space have increased their efforts to actively control the narrative, becoming a little less human in the process.

Foley’s biggest irritation came from an encounter with a rep who insisted that a writerly icon take his seat (before being directed to do so) at an awards show rather than spend a minute speaking to another WWD reporter covering the event.

But she has several other key points:

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Prada’s Suit Against ‘Too Ugly’ Whistleblower Proceeds

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Rina Bovrisse has been a thorn in Prada‘s side for some time—four years, to be exact. In 2009 the former employee of Prada Tokyo filed suit alleging sexual harassment and discrimination, and the United Nations backed her up earlier this year. Her allegations reveal some serious problems with gender relations in the workplace in Japan:

“Prada Japan CEO David Sesia reportedly demoted or dismissed female staff members who he deemed were ‘old, fat, ugly, disgusting, or did not have the Prada look’”

Bovrisse also told stories about employees being forced to buy expensive Prada products and pressured into sex by their superiors. But when she finally decided to make some noise on the topic, she got a visit from someone in HR who told her:

“You will have to change your hairstyle. And you will have to lose weight. The CEO is so ashamed of your ugliness that he won’t introduce you to any visitors from Milan.”

It gets worse after the jump:

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So No One Saw Anything Wrong With This? Sephora Pulls Kat von D Lipstick Called ‘Celebutard’ After Backlash

kat von dFile this under “Really? No one saw anything amiss? No one? Not a single, solitary person?”

Sephora has pulled off its shelves a lipstick shade from LA Ink star Kat von D’s line called Painted Love called “Celebutard.” For the few who don’t know, it’s a term that sprung into being after the Paris Hiltons and Kim Kardashians of the world started to become far more rich and famous than their talents would indicate they should. But it also incorporates the word “retard,” which caused offense to advocates for the developmentally challenged.

“It should have never been on the shelves to begin with,” said Faith Bodnar, the executive director of nonprofit Inclusion BC. And she wasn’t the only one. Other families and Glee star Lauren Potter (she plays Becky Jackson), also expressed outrage.

“I could not believe that a successful company in 2013 would use such a derogatory and mocking name for their lipstick,” said Emily Norman, mother of two children ages two and four, one with a developmental delays and the other with Down syndrome.

When a tube of this lipstick hit the desk of someone in marketing, there should’ve been a quick thumbs down and renaming.

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Should Instagram Let Fashion Bloggers Link to Sales Sites?

shutterstock_158730779Just as the first Instagram ad hit us in the form of a Michael Kors watch, many of the fashion bloggers who provide so much of the platform’s content asked “Wait, why can’t I do that?

PR may be asking the same question: why does Instagram still prohibit users from including links so followers can buy the products they highlight? It would make the give-and-take between designers and bloggers even more significant.

CEO Kevin Systrom told London Fashion Week attendees that he could see his company becoming a fashion commerce platform at some point, nothing that it’s already a great marketing tool for fashion brands—but then he waffled a bit. Here’s a key quote:

“If Instagram were full of commerce and there were ‘Buy now!’ links everywhere and that’s all you ever had, I don’t think it would get to the true spirit of communication.”

So Systrom sees Instagram as a comms tool rather than a sales tool but clearly allows for some flexibility on what he calls “the balance” between art and commerce. We get it, but we have a feeling that all four parties involved in the fashion chain would disagree: the shoppers, the bloggers, the brands and the firms representing them.

And yes, the guy is already rich—but don’t tell us he’s not jealous of Pinterest‘s ability to separate people from their money…

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