TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Media relations

Someone Fooled Nikki Finke

Nikki Finke, the least favorite blogger of many Hollywood publicists, took a small hit to her credibility this week via the revelation that she received several fake tips regarding a recent “scoop” but published the story anyway.

Someone with a vendetta used Finke’s tipline to send several emails from separate sources claiming that screenwriter Mike Landis (son of Ghostbusters director Jon Landis) was reworking the script for the perpetually pending sequel. Not true.

Here’s the media relations angle:

“Dangling the carrot further, one ‘tipster’ claimed Deadline was running the Landis story the next day. Another begged Finke not to run the story as it was promised exclusively to Variety.”

Crafty. Finke claims that a Sony studio executive “mistakenly confirmed it”, but Sony unsurprisingly told Page Six that she doesn’t check with studios on stories like these.

Two questions: Are fake stories relatively easy to place on blogs? And do we really need a Ghostbusters 3?

Two answers: Yes and hell no.

Kate Hudson Can Thank the Edit Team for This PR Fail

instyle_kate_hudson_tallGood PR is tough work: its often thankless hours are usually spent for another’s glory. There’s the client’s win, of course, but also bragging rights for the journo or outlet that snatched the juicy cover story from its competitors.

We don’t need the credit, but perhaps a little respect for our craft would be nice.

PRNewsers, consider the following situation and ask yourself how a seasoned publicist would have handled it differently.

InStyle ran a cover story about Kate Hudson in its July issue without plugging her new release. Definitely an “oops!” for InStyle, which counts on maintaining good relationships with the celebrity publicists who bring them their cover stars, but was it an “oops!” that demanded a correction?

As reported by AdAge, InStyle’s editors thought so:

Read more

Rep Demands That Editor Credit Staff for Press Release

Today the always-excellent Jim Romenesko discovered evidence of a big PR no-no in action. Seems that a five-paragraph story in the Jacksonville Daily Record may have borne some resemblance to the two-page press release accompanying the initial pitch–and whoever sent it thought that the team responsible deserved a little more credit.

Here’s the exchange as reprinted on Facebook by editor Marilyn Young, who hasn’t seen this sort of thing during more than three decades in the industry.

Romeneskoyoung

“Plagiarism” seems like an odd charge for regurgitating a press release, no?

Read more

Louis CK and Judd Apatow Ask TMZ to Take Down Tracy Morgan Crash Video

louis ck tweetLouis CK and Judd Apatow are asking TMZ (via Twitter) to remove bystander video footage of the aftermath of the Tracy Morgan bus crash that took place last weekend. The request comes after the daughter of one of the injured comedians, Ardie Fuqua, posted a note on Instagram stating, “They don’t know how hurtful it is to see my father dragged out of the wreckage.” Krizya Fuqua also talks about all of the false information that’s being spread about her father’s condition.

After reading the plea, Louis CK, who recently kicked up some dust over the CommonCore educational process on Twitter, took to the social networking site to speak directly to TMZ. The tabloid site has yet to respond, according to the most recent story we could find. That’s probably because this is a bit of a sticky situation for the site.

Read more

NRA Wants Journos to Stop Using the Word ‘Shooter’ to Describe Shooters

Here’s an unusual look at media relations efforts from an organization that uses every opportunity to brand “the media” as its enemy.

You might think that the NRA, as the nation’s largest gun owner advocacy organization, would have issued some sort of response to the latest act committed by a crazy guy with a gun. Instead, we have this piece of communications work bemoaning journalists’ supposed insistence on providing meat for their frothing-at-the-mouth anti-gun base by insisting on referring to people who kill other people with guns as “shooters” rather than “murderers.”

It’s an odd semantic complaint that reveals more than a bit of the organization’s underlying strategy: every report not created internally by the NRA itself is not to be trusted.

It’s almost like the org’s op-ed contributor is anticipating the ways in which various journalists will describe the next mass shooting and telling his listeners to ignore it as propaganda (not that he created this segment to “support a cause”).

It’s true that we may not be the world’s most receptive audience, but the NRA has a vested long-term interest in convincing the majority of Americans that its members are not the paranoid, trigger-happy caricatures the “media” seems so desperate to lead us to believe they are (according to the NRA itself).

We’re not 100% sure that this is the best way to go about it.

New York’s 9/11 Museum Encounters Some Publicity Problems

shutterstock_106467173

The very nature of New York City’s 9/11 Memorial Museum, which opened this week to the public after a limited preview for survivors and victims’ family members, ensures that it will always be something of a magnet for controversy.

A couple of issues have emerged in recent weeks: the fact that the museum organizers decided to move the unidentified remains of more than 1,000 victims into the museum without letting families know ahead of time and that the museum includes a gift shop and will soon add a restaurant–which some families have attributed to “crass commercialism.”

The most recent instance of bad press concerns media relations: a reporter for NYC blog Gothamist was escorted from the premises this week for asking a question of a fellow attendee.

Read more

Tom Cruise Agrees: 2005 Was the Year Everything Changed for Entertainment PR

tom cruise tweetDo you remember the moment that everything changed in the world of entertainment PR? This LA Weekly story proposes it was the moment we started saying that Tom Cruise jumped on Oprah’s couch. The article makes the case that he didn’t do that, but the Internet made it so.

At that time, Tom Cruise had made some of the movies he’s most known for – The Color of MoneyRain Man, Top Gun, Born on the Fourth of July — and had been crowned the third Greatest Movie Star of All Time by Premiere magazine. That was also the point where Perez Hilton and other entertainment blogs were starting to make their mark. And the same month of Cruise’s appearance on Oprah, YouTube had been unleashed upon the world.

Up to this point, Cruise had been pretty conservative about speaking publicly outside of his film appearances. He also had a powerhouse publicist by his side, Pat Kingsley. Because she worked with a number of A-list stars and entertainment journalism was confined to the print pages of magazines like People, she was able to manage media coverage of her clients with a firm grip. If she wanted to shut something down, she could make a call and do it.

But the article points out the free-for-all that blogs and viral video made of celebrity media. Particularly because stars — not used to the round-the-clock brutal coverage — said and did things out in the open that they didn’t think would get out (or be of interest if it did).

Read more

White House: No More Citing Leaks for News Stories

WhiteHouse

Politics is PR writ large, and anyone who follows the Game of (Congressional) Seats knows how important “unauthorized disclosures” can be to journalists looking to better inform the public about how the sausage is made.

Citing such disclosures has long been the best way for an office/administration to address important information that it didn’t release in any official capacity–information like The Guardian’s Edward Snowden leaks, which demanded a public response.

In a story we didn’t have time to address last week, The White House made clear that it’s no longer OK with this old school push-pull approach by officially forbidding current and former national intelligence officials from commenting about stories based on intel data–whether that information happens to be classified or not.

So no one who works or has worked for the NSA–or any of the 16 other intel agencies–can discuss Snowden or any other story known to involve leaks.

Read more

STUDY: How Do Journalists Use Social Media Today?

shutterstock_164505902

We’re all very aware that journalism on the whole is having something of a “moment”. Thankfully, The Indiana School of Journalism has attempted to answer some of the central questions in media and PR with a report on the state of the practice that is essential reading for every communications professional worth his or her salt.

As The Washington Post reported this week, two professors at the school surveyed more than 1,000 pro newsmen and women to create “The American Journalist in the Digital Age“, the latest edition of a survey they’ve run approximately once a decade since 1971.

Takeaways and cool graphs* after the jump.

Read more

Holland Tourism: Masters of Cool

Amsterdam Clipper Ship Sign2 Cropped“I never had such a good backdrop”, said President Obama. During a recent state visit to The Netherlands, he took a side trip to Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum, home of Rembrandt’s renowned Nightwatch painting. As his comment indicates, he was duly impressed. Only select destinations worldwide merit presidential visits, and a visit to The Hague prompted Obama’s trip.

The President’s visit may help put The Netherlands front and center for U.S. travelers, who represent the country’s fourth largest source of visitors. The Dutch tourism effort in the U.S. has been quite active lately, as Holland continues to upgrade its star attractions. Many of its famous museums are being renovated, and they’re reopening in stages.

We checked with The Netherlands Board of Tourism & Conventions (NBTC) about its PR and marketing programs. They partnered with Amsterdam Marketing, Amsterdam Airport Schiphol and KLM Royal Dutch Airlines for a 3-year joint marketing program, “Holland. The Original Cool”. The campaign’s video series has been the most visible joint effort. Launched last year, it features Pim de Koel, the country’s cool brand ambassador, as he teaches an American traveler about unique aspects of Dutch culture. Last year the video received over a million views, and this year it’s a three-part series, with the second episode debuting today.

Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>