AgencySpy LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy FishbowlNY FishbowlDC GalleyCat SocialTimes

News

Sony Hires Rubenstein, Threatens Journalists Publishing Hacked Data

Sony_Pictures_Entertainment_entrance_1

Sony Pictures has hired New York’s Rubenstein Communications to handle the fallout from its epic document leak, and the company made its first visible move to limit the ongoing bad press over the weekend by threatening to sue all who report on related materials.

Specifically, the studio’s lawyer David Boies (of Bush v. Gore and many other cases) demanded that all news organizations delete the “stolen data” they already have or will receive and agree to stop reporting on it. Essentially, Boies threatened to sue any organization that publishes future stories drawn from the emails and other materials leaked by hackers.

Sony tried to get the heads of other major studios to sign the letter but they abstained, noting that it might look like “a publicity stunt.”

The real conversation piece, though, is a New York Times op-ed from Aaron Sorkin of The West Wing and The Social Network. In summary, Sorkin tells journalists “You’re Giving Material Aid to Criminals.”

Read more

Bill Cosby Talks to New York Post, Advises ‘Black Media’ to Stay ‘Neutral’

bill cosby

Whoopi Goldberg/Jill Scott shout-outs aside, Bill Cosby made his first statements on the allegations and legal charges pending against him over the weekend. In what may seem like an unusual strategic move, he chose freelancer Stacy Brown (of the somewhat notorious New York Post gossip source Page Six) as his press contact of choice.

Brown called Cosby, who made a request:

“I only expect our black media to uphold the standards of excellence in journalism, and when you do that you have to go in with a neutral mind.”

The implication, of course, is that the rest of the media and the court of public opinion have already called him guilty.

Read more

The Ticker: Women in WSJ; Storytelling Everywhere; Media Personalities; And More

Biggest Stories of the Week

The Ticker: Sony Apologies; More Revelations; Facebook CTA; And More

Spin the Agencies of Record

economist cover

  • Havas PR will leverage its global network for The Economist, that classic magazine of finance, politics, and world affairs. The firm’s primary role involves promoting The Economist Espresso, its first daily mobile app, which launched in November. Ravi Sunnak, EVP, Corporate, Havas PR, writes that “We are continuing the raise the visibility of The Economist and establish their thought leadership status…[via] an influencer outreach campaign.” Said campaign has already earned many editorial mentions and inspired us to look up the real name of the man we know only as “Lexington.”

Read more

The Ticker: Year’s Top Stunts; TV Is Over; Gawker PR; And More

The Ticker: 2015 Predictions; The PESO Model; Apple Fashion; And More

Strange Fruit Founders Release Statement and New Name

shutterstock_139453442

Unfortunately for a couple of PR professionals, the odd name chosen for their firm has driven a large share of conversation within the industry on a slow winter news week.

We’ve been on vacation, so we heard of the Austin-based firm previously known as “Strange Fruit PR” for the first time yesterday. We’re still not clear as to why the story just broke when the firm had been using that name since 2012, but happen it did…and now the company has announced its new name: Perennial Public Relations.

Here’s a statement from founders Mary Mickel & Ali Slutsky to our own Tonya Garcia, who wrote yesterday’s post:

“We sincerely apologize to those offended by the former name of our firm. As of today, we have renamed our firm to Perennial Public Relations. We have always prided ourselves as open-minded individuals and we remain committed to serving our clientele and community. In no way did we ever intend for the name of our firm to offend nor infer any implication of racism.  We are grateful for and appreciate the ongoing support of our clients and community.”

Read more

10 of the Worst Press Headlines Ever: a Learning Opportunity

bad press headlineMentorship is underrated and under-utilized.

With PR executives jetsetting, working remotely, stuck in a marathon of meetings, or hibernating behind an office closed door, there is rarely a chance to hunker down for a learning opportunity.

On that note, one of the most visible flubs for any flack is the press release – specifically the headline.

It’s what you use to grab a reporter’s attention…at your own peril. While most headlines are perfectly functional, some earn a special place on the conference room bulletin board.

Bad headlines do happen…so let’s review a few and try to make sure they happen to someone else in the future.  Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>