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Pitches

Showcase Your Clients in Wine Enthusiast

Wine-Enthusiast-ArticleWine Enthusiast is a niche mag with a very specific type of reader: usually in his or her mid-to upper 40s, with a median income of  $100,000. It’s the perfect demo to pitch clients of yours in the travel or food and beverage industry.

PR folks should send pitches via email, and the best timing is five months prior to the issue publication date. Here are some other tips:

Publicists should focus on wine, food (both cooking and dining out) and travel. Successful pitches include chef profiles and recipes for the front-of-book, as well as product suggestions for the holiday gift guide. If you represent a restaurant, even better. “A lot of times, it’s restaurant publicists who have something new or special in their beverage programs or some sort of recurring wine series [that we might cover],” says managing editor Joe Czerwinski. “Occasionally we spotlight individual sommeliers in Q&As. So there are some cool things that we’re certainly open to hearing from people on.

For more, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Wine Enthusiast.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

How to Land Your Clients a Spot in Essence

Essence-ArticleEssence, which calls itself the black women’s bible, is ripe for PR pitches. With 1.5 million issues in print (and 1 million online), this pub reaches a large, niche audience.

Editors at Essence want PR folks to know that they are inundated with press releases, so pitches need not be generic. Be sure to thoroughly research the brand before delivering your pitch:

“The number one thing I want publicists to know is that yes, Essence is a magazine for black women. Our mission statement is ‘We tell black women’s stories like no one else can.’ But,” [deputy managing editor Dawnie Walton] stressed, “you still need to know a little bit more about the brand than just pitching anything having to do with black people in general.” Also helpful: pitching to the right person. Take a look at the masthead and know who covers what to make a press release or story suggestion more targeted.

For more, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Essence.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Tips on Pitching and Media Relations from Facebook’s Media Coach Bill McGowan

Bill-McGowan

Bill McGowan has held many titles throughout his career: journalist, “A Current Affair” reporter, author, founder and CEO of Clarity Media Group.

His most recent role is media coach for executives, celebrities and artists ranging from Kelly Clarkson and Eli Manning to Thomas Keller and Tim Gunn. He’s also worked with major firms to help PR professionals hone the art of the pitch.

Two of his most recent clients’ names might ring a bell: Sheryl Sandberg and Mark Zuckerberg.

In McGowan’s latest book Pitch Perfect: How to Say It Right the First Time, Every Time, he draws on decades of experience working both in front of and behind the camera to offer tips and tools on how to deliver a message efficiently and confidently.

We recently spoke to Bill to learn how that experience applies to PR.

Read more

SheKnows Needs Original, Timely PR Pitches

She-Knows-Article

SheKnows.com is a no-nonsense, service-driven site that gets 68 million monthly page views. It’s known for its broad range of content that aims to empower women, making it perfect for PR pros hoping to showcase their clients to a female audience on a constant hunt for everyday solutions.

Lauren Swanson, director of editorial operations, advises that publicists pitch original angles that readers can use. Also, be aware of the editorial calendar and make sure seasonal items are pitched one to two months in advance:

[Swanson] says the website gets plenty of last-minute holiday-related stories, but they don’t typically accept them unless it has “social media mojo.” “We generally ignore pitches that are not relevant or clearly skew toward promoting a product,” she says. “Our bloggers generally curate products based on research and testing, so we are not inclined to pass along PR product pushes unless the product is innovative.”

To hear more about the mag, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: SheKnows.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

5 Things to Never Say During a Media Pitch

shut_upIf you are in charge of a PR team of any size, you should have had to do this — listen to your team pitch the media, critique them following the call, and watch them grow.

First, if you have never done that, turn in your APR certification or brass name plate. Second, if you have, then you have felt the cringe factor when a hard-working (or suck-out-loud) team member is speaking with a member of the media and trips over his or her tongue.

The pitch is off. The talking points are missing. And the end is near. *CLICK*

If you understand that cringe, then get our a pen and paper, high-five me, and write down the 5 things to never say during a media pitch.  Read more

Pitching Advice from a Former Tech Journalist

Bekah Grant is no longer a tech journalist. But she covered startups, apps and acquisitions (aka our clients) for more than two years at VentureBeat, and she has some advice worth heeding beyond these truth bombs:

In a Medium piece last week, Grant offered PRs some general guidance on understanding and interacting with the writers who cover the tech beat.

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5 Mistakes to Avoid When Speaking in Public

publicspeak

You sweating yet?

In most PR agencies, flacks have one fear coursing through their bodies that forces them to consider wetting their pants just to relieve some stress — public speaking. You would think in this industry those are fears you leave at the door or reconsider your career choice, but there it is.

The public relations pros that have this issue — glossophobia, to those diagnosed and on medication — love pitching because they can hide behind a phone, or even better, an anonymous IP address and email. However, if those same folks are on the pitch team, they freak.

So, if you are among those whose knees are knocking, palms are sweating, and throats are cracking reading this post, don’t fret. Here are 5 mistakes to avoid when caught in front of a crowd of possible clients.

Read more

New Gmail Extension Allows You to Be Even More OCD Over Pitches

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So last month while we were sleeping, Google released a new Chrome/Gmail extension called Streak that allows you to see when recipients read your outgoing emails.

We’re a little glad that we didn’t hear about it upon release, because the appropriate adjectives used to describe it include “horrifying” and “creepy.”

Read more

How to Pitch: Down East, the Magazine of Maine

Down-East-article

Down East, “the Magazine of Maine,” covers more than just lobsters, beer and farming. It spotlights the local dining, art and culture scenes — and even runs investigative pieces that have actually changed state legislature.

The mag’s readership is 60 percent out of state, including those who flock to Maine for the summer. So here’s how to get editors to consider your pitches:

Publicists can help in two areas: Down East is actively seeking more “cool stuff that’s made in Maine,” especially for its new December gift guide issue. Send your pitch in by August to make the December issue and be sure to include paid return postage as the magazine has a strict policy against accepting gifts. Publicists can also pitch successful Maine businesses as potential profiles for the “Making It in Maine” column.

To hear more about the mag, including contact details, read: How To Pitch: Down East.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Spotlight Your Clients in Natural Health

natural-health-article

Natural Health‘s key demographic is women in their 30s who are focused on having a healthy body and living an “earth-friendly lifestyle.” Because the mag has a brand new look, mission and stable of editors, it’s a good time for PR pros to reach out.

This bimonthly pub’s editors are happy to accept publicists’ pitches, as long as they’re on target: “Think of the sell for the Natural Health reader,” said deputy editor Andrea Bartz. “Yes, these chips might be tasty, but are they actually healthier? Where do the products align with the mission of the magazine?” You also need to be able to communicate effectively:

While novelty and timeliness are both key components of a successful PR pitch to Natural Health, more important than both is a clear communication that the client being pitched holds the same standards and beliefs of the magazine. “If you tell me about a dermatologist that’s a good dermatologist, we won’t be very interested,” Bartz explained. “But if you tell me about a dermatologist who takes a very integrative approach and thinks about things the way we do as a magazine, that’s huge.”

For more about this pub, including editors’ contact details, read: How To Pitch: Natural Health.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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