TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Tips and Tools

5 Easy Tips for Proofreading Your Own Work

proofreading

We all do it. Regardless of one’s stature in the PR community, whether one’s business card includes the letters “APR”, or the phrase “agency principal”, every flack has to serve as his/her own editor on occasion (facepalm implied).

FULL DISCLOSURE: I’m thinking of getting myself checked into editing rehab for “cerebral flatulence”–or something like that.

I read each blog post at least once before submitting it, and I read my own releases twice. And yet, someone, somewhere always finds that one mistake that makes me feel like I’m just learning to overcome dyslexia. We all miss words because we wrote them, so in our heads everything is peachy.

For you, here are 5 easy tips for proofreading your own workRead more

5 PR Myths That Still Need Debunking

PR

Public relations.

It’s an industry hiding more mysteries than whatever sauce transforms actors into superhumans on the red carpet. No one really seems to understand every nuance in PR–not even our fellow flacks. Of course, our parents just tell their friends at church group that “my kid gets people on TV”, but that’s another story.

Here’s the aggravating part: many of the most persistent myths in PR still get repeated by people within the industry. These are the folks who make meetings to have meetings, schedule lunches to “network,” and use phrases like “moving the needle” because, as a certain group of cranberries once said, “Everybody else is doing it, so why can’t we?”

Here, dear readers, are five of the myths we need to keep on debunking.

Read more

Check These Boxes Before Issuing Your RFP

shutterstock_148631159

Today we bring you a guest post from Tim Munroe, VP of business development at Boston’s Pan Communications, concerning the dreaded RFP–and some tips on how to make the process a more valuable experience for all involved.

Over my 20 years in public relations, I have seen many requests for proposals (RFPs) from companies seeking agency services. Candidly, most RFPs are simply boilerplate, copy and pasted and with little to no tailoring to a company’s specific PR needs.  Some are well designed; many are not.

Most RFPs don’t ask the right questions or supply the right information for responding PR agencies.   What’s worse: many of the PR RFP questions provide no real chance for PR firms to distinguish themselves from each other. That’s whole point of the RFP exercise in the first place, right? Find the differences in agencies and select the one that best suits your needs.  For the most part, RFPs often are watered down attempts to level the playing field for agencies, but do nothing to winnow down the field of responding firms.

Here are some thoughts on how to change this copy & paste approach and create a better RFP when looking for a PR agency.

Read more

Lessons Learned from the #myNYPD Twitter Disaster

shutterstock_113565574

The New York Police Department’s recent, spectacular social media failure followed a now-familiar formula: organization calls for fan submissions over popular network, receives overwhelming stream of negativity.

In this case, as in the case of JP Morgan’s #AskJPM and other comparable disasters, the headlines surrounding the futile effort at community outreach quickly drowned out any coincidental good will from the public. And yet, despite it all, department commissioner Bill Bratton now claims that he will continue to attempt similar projects moving forward.

This week, we spoke to LEVICK SVP/digital communications chair Peter LaMotte to try and make sense of the resulting mess.

Read more

The 7 Principles of Effective Communications Explained by Bill McGowan

Bill McG2

Last week we brought you a series of tips on pitching and media relations from author, veteran journalist and Clarity Media Group founder Bill McGowan, most recently known as media coach to Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg (among many other celebrities and executives).

Today we bring you an extension of our conversation touching on the seven principles that form the basis of McGowan’s most recent book Pitch Perfect: How to Say It Right the First Time, Every Time.

In this piece, Bill explains how these principles apply to both the general art of communicating and the public relations practice–with a little help from one Donald Draper.

Read more

5 Things Young PR Pros Should Know to Get a Job

PR hiring

About that? So am I … just sayin’.

ICYMI: The U.S. job market is doing a skosh better than it was years ago.

That said, there are a few jobs available in public relations. Good times, right? Are you ready to snag them? If you think you are — whether you are fresh out of college or have a couple of years in your portfolio — there may be a few things to understand before you hit *APPLY*.

Aside from your charming personality and winning smile that would make a dentist hate your guts, how can you stand out from the competition? Here are 5 ways to do just that. Get your Moleskine and enjoy.

Read more

5 Things to Know About Choosing the Right Keywords

seo-keywords-thumb

The phrase is content strategy. And, whether you feel confident about it or not, my fellow flacks, this is slowly becoming your bag in PR. SEO is an ever-evolving thing. It’s like watching a child actor grow up — you know the brick wall is coming, it’s just when he or she will run smooth into the damn thing.

We are running into SEO and many flacks aren’t prepared because of all the many nuances behind keywords. What are they really? How do you use them? When is the best time to write them?

To wit, here’s our latest 5 Things listicle: What to know about choosing the right keywords. *High Five!*  Read more

5 Facts PR Pros Should Know About Social Media

social-media-today

Yeah CNN. This isn’t breaking news either.

And yet, while everyone in public relations understands that social media is here to stay, it is still being fought by the old curmudgeons in the corner office. Why? Because it’s too newfangled for them to comprehend so it must be a passing fad.

Uh, not so much, boss person.

Nonetheless, there are still some facts about social media that escape even the most learned “guru,” “expert,” or “ninja.” And that was the muse for this helpful listicle: the 5 facts PR professionals should know about social media … but may not.

Enjoy.

Read more

Here’s What You Need to Know About Pinterest’s Promoted Pins

shutterstock_174136835 (1)

The first reports on Pinterest’s entry into paid media territory came way back in September, yet the “Promoted Pins” rollout has been more of a slow dribble. While first adopter Four Seasons received some press, for the most part all related stories have been teases designed to leave brands salivating at the potential.

Even a recent Wall Street Journal story calling the project an effort to “reinvent online advertising” noted that, while investors are convinced that Pinterest will prove profitable:

“The company declines to comment on precise timing, costs of the ads or who the first marketers will be.”

Vague enough for you? We recently spoke to Eric Schiffer, CEO of DigitalMarketing.com, for his take on what to make of this newest attempt to monetize social.

Read more

Analyze This: The Latest Digital and Consumer Intel from ARF’s RE:THINK Conference

Do Not Disturb Sign Final CroppedComing to terms with issues surrounding big data and digital’s vast terrain seems like running on an endless treadmill. But at ARF’s RE:THINK 2014 conference in New York this week, attendees found some answers to dilemmas like online consumer privacy, what drives contagious content and defining digital metrics. A research survey, mnemonic device and reference guide all contained clues, and below are key takeaways.

Consumers’ reaction to online privacy incursions: Do not disturb.
“The creepy part of privacy invasion is when they get it right”, said Communispace‘s chairman, Diane Hessan. Her firm collaborated with Pew Research Center, conducting research among 50 global communities, to understand tradeoffs between online privacy and personalization.

The key finding: 86% of consumers would stop data tracking if they could. Only 14% would like to receive targeted offers based on purchase or browsing histories. Older consumers are more concerned with privacy, and younger ones are more open to offers. Online users want to avoid invaders like hackers or advertisers, finding targeted ads to be annoying, creepy and intrusive.

Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>