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Posts Tagged ‘Ad Age’

Ad Age Reporter Cotton Delo Joins DKC PR

Cotton-DeloIn another example of the not-quite-new firms hiring journalists trend, Ad Age San Francisco bureau chief Cotton Delo has joined DKC Public Relations.

Delo–who specialized in social and digital during her nearly three years with Ad Age–will help further expand the firm’s Bay Area operations, which began just three months ago with the hiring of SVP Michelle Cox.

Delo will be Account Supervisor handling campaign initiatives for DKC clients based in and around San Francisco (a roster that includes names like LinkedIn, Airbnb, Yahoo and Sega).

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Ogilvy & Mather Signs Tiffany & Co.

tiffany-and-co-torontos-tiffanybloor-004This morning Ad Age scooped the news that Tiffany & Co.’s global agency search is over: Ogilvy & Mather will serve as its creative AOR.

Reports focus on the traditional advertising aspects of the deal, which follows the company’s appointment of a new design director and a third quarter marked by rising sales around the world. The news is made more significant by the fact that Tiffany’s famously keeps most of its operations in-house, and our sister site AgencySpy notes that Ogilvy will handle print, video and digital “in tandem with the latter’s in-house marketing team”; Ogilvy CMO Lauren Crampsie told Ad Age “we are honored to be selected as [Tiffany's] trusted marketing partner.”

The move will inevitably affect PR as well, though: pending challenges include familiarizing new markets with the Tiffany name and helping the brand continue its vigorous defense of its own intellectual property rights (which famously include its own trademarked color).

In other words, there will be quite a bit of communications work ahead for everyone associated with one of the world’s best-known fashion names.

POLL: Should Publishers Use Editorial Staff to Create Sponsored Content?

How does one go about making sponsored content that doesn’t stick out like a sore thumb? A few bold publishers are answering that question by turning to their own in-house editorial teams to get the job done.

Mashable has been writing posts for sponsors for some time, but Ad Age points out a more interesting case study: Mental Floss founder Mangesh Hattikudur’s U.S. Open live-blog/trivia session post, sponsored by IBM.

Hattikudur notes that IBM did not approve the content before publishing—and he’d planned to cover the event regardless.

The point is that content created by a publisher’s editorial staff will feel more authentic and therefore bring more value to the sponsor as readers grow increasingly skeptical of advertorials.

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Taco Bell Gets Recognized for Taking Chances With Its Marketing

ICYMI: Taco Bell was chosen as Ad Age‘s “Marketer of the Year.” Congrats Taco Bell! All those Doritos Locos Tacos really paid off. Literally. Same-store sales were up eight percent in 2012, beating McDonald’s by a bunch (it had 3.3 percent same-store growth in 2012).

The company has clearly made an investment in product. Ad Age says the company took three years to come up with the Doritos Locos Tacos. (They’ve sold more than 600 million of them.) And they’ve done the new tagline thing (“Live mas.”) And while it makes me cringe to read that the company “has notably sprinkled some Spanish into the spots to convey authenticity,” it’s clear the company is doing something right to hit its target markets and expand into new ones. The two things that stand out are its willingness to change and the commitment to reaching its audience effectively.

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The Art of Creating and Pitching Well Crafted Op-Ed Pieces

Even Rodin, the French sculptor who created iconic images like The Thinker, (left) might have a hard time getting his opinions published in some media outlets today. That is, unless the artist also possessed a writing style with a strong viewpoint that was provocative or counterintuitive with a catchy, conversational tone.

Those were some of the pointers from the editorial panelists at a recent PCNY event on pitching opinion pieces, bylined and contributed content. Other desirable criteria include articles with compelling angles that are well sourced and grounded in facts. Self-serving or promotional pieces don’t make the cut. So if a sculptor like Rodin was intent on seeing his name in print or online, he’d be well advised to write about the fine arts category, not focus exclusively on his own masterpieces.

The panelists represented a broad array of digital and print outlets with varying degrees of difficulty for outside submissions to break through. These included: CNN Digital, Bloomberg View, Business Insider, The Huffington Post, Ad Age and The Muse. Of course the industries these media brands cover aren’t targeted or limited to art. They encompass categories ranging from politics and economics to technology, marketing, media, careers and lifestyle.

Each editor painted a brief picture of their outlet and provided tips for prospective guest contributors.

CNN Digital: The Opinion section of the site “hosts a wide range of views across the spectrum of politics, religion, arts and other areas”, explained Richard Galant, senior opinion editor. They only publish one or two outside submissions per day, and they want original, exclusive hooks to ongoing news stories.

Bloomberg View: Editorial board member Frank Wilkinson described the two-year old site as “a startup within a large news organization”. He said their op-ed page only takes selected outside contributors since they now produce more opinion related content in-house. Their core focus is the intersection of economics, finance, government and cultural issues, and they look for densely researched pieces.

Business Insider: The site has evolved, according to managing editor Jessica Liebman. There are now 15 sections, like technology, finance, retail, politics, sports, lifestyle, military and defense, with plans to add energy and healthcare. Their current focus is having quality contributors and selected bloggers post about newsy or fun topics.

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G.E. Is Totally Cool With 30 Rock, You Guys

30 Rock Tina Fey Alec BaldwinSay you’re a PR/branding exec at a big corporation. Say there’s a certain sitcom that’s been making fun of you mercilessly for seven years (while appearing on a network that you once owned). What would you do?

Well, if you’re General Electric and that sitcom is 30 Rock, you embrace it after maintaining an adversarial relationship for more than six seasons. G.E., which has seen its “Six Sigma” super-productivity culture mocked repeatedly by Tina Fey, recently decided to let the public know that it is totally in on the joke.

We weren’t the only ones who noticed the company’s weird “thank you” commercial on last week’s episode. Global director of brand management Linda Boff explained everything to Ad Age, saying “G.E. employees and G.E. executives have laughed for the last seven years along with the rest of the audience.”

Oh yeah? Something tells us that former CEO/conspiracy theorist Jack Welch (aka Jack Donaghy) didn’t even chuckle, but at least somebody has a sense of humor.

It’s a bit of a rebranding, really:

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Katie Couric Scores Manti Te’o Interview (They Share a Publicist, BTW)

Katie Couric Manti Te'o InterviewSo Manti Te’o, who most Americans believe to be a big old liar, visited Katie Couric‘s office for his first official post-scandal interview, set to air tomorrow. While we’re interested in the fact that he admitted to “briefly” lying about the fake dead girlfriend hoax for six weeks after learning that he’d been duped (yeah right), we’d like to examine the “Inside PR” aspects of the story.

We love Katie and all, but no one would call her a sports journalist–and we don’t feel like the scandal is quite big enough to justify a trip to Oprah-land (though the Te’o family apparently considered Oprah and Dr. Phil before settling for Couric). So how did she score this top interview? Well, the fact that the two parties share a publicist certainly didn’t hurt. That’s right–Matthew Hiltzik of Hiltzik Strategies (MediaBeat interview after the jump) now performs crisis comms/damage control duties for both Couric and Te’o, so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that Te’o chose Couric over both Oprah and ESPN.

Is this standard operating procedure? Or does it raise even more questions about the players involved in this sordid tale?

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M&M’s Teases Fans, Won’t Air Commercial Before Super Bowl

Someone call Page Six: There will be a new M&M’s commercial during Super Bowl XLVII that will serve as the society debut of the brand’s new tagline, “Better with M”. Hmm…intriguing. So, what else do we know about the commercial?

Nothing, really–and that’s the beauty behind the “anticipation bubble” concept referenced by marketer Roy Benin in this Ad Age article. The big tease is a marketing strategy that your stoic nun-schooled grandmother would appreciate.

See, the public is addicted to instant gratification. We want breaking information yesterday, and we devour everything from politics to porn like a downstream alligator on an upstream antelope. Everything in our lives is there for the taking, and when can’t get what we want it, we want it even more.

(We don’t really like to pay for things either.)

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‘Demand a Plan’ Gun Control Campaign Launches Viral Video

We recently told you about the Demand a Plan campaign launched by social advocacy group Mayors Against Illegal Guns, co-chaired by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino. The social media campaign geared toward pushing American politicians to pass gun control legislation urges supporters to sign a petition, contact their legislators and mayors, write letters to editors of major publications and voice their support on Twitter and Facebook. The multifaceted project has all its PR bases covered–and now it has a celebrity-filled viral video to boot.

The spot, which features such familiar names and faces as Jon Hamm, Beyoncé, Chris Rock and many others, made it to number 6 on the Ad Age Viral Video Chart this week. Like all of the campaign’s content, the video’s simple, straight-forward, no-frills style serves to promote its overall message: less rhetoric, more action.

New Advertising Strategy: Get the Competition’s Ads Pulled

We recently told you about the UK’s Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) pulling a clever Soda Stream ad for allegedly “denigrating” the competition (i.e. Coke and Pepsi) even though neither company’s products appeared in the commercial. This over-reaction demonstrates a larger trend in Brittan’s advertising world — the ASA now fields a record number of complaints about ads, and the complaints just keep rolling in.

Did commercials become more offensive all of a sudden? Or is this less an issue of individuals being offended by ads than of organizations using complaints to further their own causes and companies trying to squash competitors by getting their ads pulled? (Hint: it’s the latter.)

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