TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Adventures in Marketing’

14 Brands Want to Remind You That It’s Pi Day

shutterstock_92111186

If you’ve ever written a social media calendar for any client brands, you know that comprehensive lists of every single obscure holiday are essential tools. Why? Because it’s surprisingly challenging to make, say, bottled water sound interesting every day on Facebook and Twitter.

That’s why—as other blogs may have already reminded you—pretty much every brand imaginable has created some sort of Pi Day social media post.

Here, then, are a few that stood out to us.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Presentation Writing: Design and Delivery

Presentation Writing: Design and DeliveryLearn how to use storytelling techniques and visual content to create and deliver successful pitches and presentations! Starting August 6, Amanda Pacitti, the manager of learning at Time Inc., will teach you the best practices for presentations, from using software like Prezi and Powerpoint, to writing your script, and using images, audio, and video to drive your points. Register now! 

British People Very Annoyed by Your ‘Content Marketing’

shutterstock_139655147

Brand advocacy is great, right? Sure it is—unless you happen to be an advocate’s best friend.

Peter Ormerod of The Guardian seems a bit confused, though: what he calls “friendvertising” is really just successful content marketing, or brand-produced videos shared by those in his social (media) circle.

Ormerod takes particular umbrage at the WestJet Christmas campaign and Dove‘s “Real Beauty”, claiming that the offending companies are using feel-good, socially positive messaging to hide their true intentions: sales. These were, of course, two of 2013′s most successful campaigns—so we can’t imagine what he’d say about lesser entries in the content marketing field.

Read more

This California Crop Circle Is Your New Favorite Marketing Stunt

In case you haven’t broken out that Led Zeppelin CD box set recently, here is an especially groovy crop circle (pic via these dudes):

crop-circle-15

And here’s Jen Hsung Huang, CEO of software maker Nvidia, explaining how his company’s marketing team created its own crop circle in a clever ploy for attention—and a certain dorky reporter discovered the secret message within:

It’s basically an opening shot to win the company a little attention ahead of this week’s Consumer Electronics Show, and we’d say it worked.

Read more

Diet Coke Has Taylor Swift and Pepsi Has ‘a Pleasing Aroma’

pepsi01

Two things we learned from Pepsi‘s latest Adventure in Marketing: there is a Scent Marketing Institute and the number two soft drink company just patented a “delivery system” technology designed to “[cause] a favorable aroma” as soon as you open each bottle. The purpose of this brilliant invention is to, you know, counter all the artificial chemical smells of the packaging and the terrible product inside.

Looks like the smell will come from some sort of chemical combo contained in a small gelatin capsule on the inner side of the cap. Remember that gelatin is made of cows, puppies and sunbeams, which means Pepsi will no longer be animal-free. That’s a PR problem waiting to happen, but at least the moo moos aren’t genetically modified!

This might beat Diet Coke‘s skinny Taylor Swift can for sheer ridiculousness. But is it dumber than the new “conforms to your hand” bottle? You be the judge.

Hat tip to Consumerist.

Adventures in Marketing: The ‘Calorie Neutral’ Restaurant

Veteran food publicist and Restaurant Intelligence Agency founder Ellen Malloy thinks restaurants need to develop better PR plans by “owning” the stories behind their businesses, but many still use shameless stunts to stand out in a crowded field. For example, an otherwise respected new Brooklyn spot called Aska turned quite a few critics’ heads (and stomachs) by including a “pig’s blood cracker with seabuckthorn jam” on its menu.

Today AdAge reports on another high-class food brand powered by an even more ridiculous PR stunt: the “calorie-neutral” meal.

Read more

Adventures in Marketing: Wrigley’s Caffeinated ‘Energy Gum’

Wrigley's Alert Energy Caffeine GumDo you love caffeine but don’t want to get hooked on the Colombian bean or risk your health by chugging Monster and 5-Hour Energy? Well then Wrigley’s has the product for you: Alert Energy Gum! We always thought that the indisputable way to make anything more fun was to “add alcohol”, but that rule apparently now applies to caffeine as well.

This chewable jolt is hardly your grandma’s Doublemint or Juicy Fruit–it seems that brands like those just weren’t exciting enough for the demanding, limited-attention-span Millennial set, so Wrigley’s just had to give them more of what they love most: drugs! The company claims that Alert is designed for “consumers 25 and older who want a portable energy product that will let them control their caffeine consumption”, but we know better. (Also: this product is sadly not related to Stay Alert chewing gum, which is marketed specifically to members of the U.S. military.)

While those big drink brands face lawsuits and the city of Chicago considers banning drinks with more than 180 mg of caffeine per serving, energy addicts can just get their chew on as long as they don’t mind the “bitter, medicinal taste”. Our favorite part of the campaign rollout has to be this quote (from a company representative, no less):

“The taste expectations are different for someone who wants to chew gum for energy than for someone who chews gum for flavor. If you come at this as a piece of gum that you chew for enjoyment it’s not going to deliver on that.”

OK, so maybe it’s really not for the kids! But now we finally have a new twist on that classic “walking and chewing gum” question: can one chew Alert and drink Four Loko at the same time?

Adventures in Marketing: Authentic Greek ‘Brogurt’

Note to anyone pushing a yogurt that defines itself as “Powerful” and promises to help you “find your inner abs“: we hope, for your own sake, that you’re in on the joke.

Thankfully, Powerful Yogurt CEO Carlos Ramirez seems to get it. He has no problem with people who call his product sexist, explaining that “We made a product with a guy in mind” because Muscle Milk is kinda gross. He admits that the whole idea is “a marketing stunt” specifically designed to polarize audiences–the fact that certain kinds of people, ahem, hate the campaign will only make their boyfriends love it that much more!

The best part about this revolutionary product? It’s freaking yogurt. There is absolutely nothing that distinguishes it from any other brand in your dairy aisle except packaging and marketing. And oh, the marketing.

Read more

Adventures in Marketing: CVS Can’t Say ‘Vibrator’ Without Giggling

Some quick background info: When it comes to pharmacies (at least in the northeast), people seem to be either Walgreens people or CVS people. My mother and I are loyal members of the latter group, and share a CVS card (the membership card that allows customers to receive discounts and build rewards as they shop). Because my tech-challenged mom doesn’t have an e-mail address, I get all of the promotional emails and coupons (addressed to her) in my own inbox.

Yesterday, I woke up to an email offering me (well, my mom) 20% off everything at CVS’s online store. The subject line of the email read: “20% Off Everything. Even the hush-hush stuff.” At first, I assumed that meant things like tampons or adult diapers–things no one waves in the air with pride and might be more comfortable receiving via snail mail. But then I opened the email and saw the accompanying picture of a young woman who looked much more like she was getting away with something a little naughty than dealing with a leaky bladder.

The caption read, “If it makes you blush, we’ll ship it to you hush-hush.”

And then, through my still-groggy morning fog, it hit me – are they trying to entice me into their online sale by promising the discreet delivery of a…um… personal pleasure device? And then, finally, the traumatic realization that this email was not addressed to me washed over me. “OMG, they’re trying to sell a vibrator to my mom.

Read more

Adventures in Marketing: Fanta Releases ‘Tastable’ Print Ad

Today in This Sounds Kind of Gross news: words on paper are somehow still around! This week sugary drinkmaker Fanta wants to turn its latest product launch campaign into something of a PR stunt with a new twist on that classic branding tool. The company and its agency, Dubai’s OgilvyOne, claim to have created the world’s first “tastable print ad” to promote its new “orange” flavor.

Intrigued? It’s a page that looks like this:

Fanta Tastable Print Ad

As you can see, the spot encourages dupes in the audience to “tear off a piece of this page, pop in your mouth & enjoy a Fanta”. What does it taste like? The team got a little creative with their copywriting, describing it as:

“…a burst of sunshine through a cool wisp of wind, it’s sweet and tangy, surprising and juicy. It tickles like a delicious secret that you cannot bear to share. And how lush it feels at every sip, like an instant whiff of a fresh bouquet of flowers in spring! With a quick sharp jolt of tart and a sudden burst of sugary-citrusy-sweetness, it leaves your tongue tingling pleasantly. Then, it curls deliciously around your taste buds, tantalizing your imagination & ripples happily down your spine.”

OK then! Here’s the video:

Read more

Adventures in Marketing: Headphones by Snooki

Say you’re promoting a “premium” product with minimal production costs and you want to heighten its appeal to a certain target audience. What do you do? First you label it “premium” or “exclusive”. Then you slap a barely-related celebrity’s name on it and jack up its price well beyond reason. Score!

The latest industry overcome by celebrity endorsement deals is audio equipment. Headphones appear to be the new sneakers–when the $300 Beats by Dre model debuted a couple of years ago, they were the earwear equivalent of Nike Air Jordans. The first question to ask someone wearing Beats by Dre was either “When’s your album coming out?” or “How can I get tickets to the release party?”

Once marketers realized how profitable this racket can be, everyone and his brother (and his brother’s nephew, who appeared on one episode of some reality show) jumped aboard the C-list headphone train. Are they better than iPod earbuds? Do they offer deeper bass and crisper high-end sounds for compressed, low-quality mp3s? Sure–but this is more than a little ridiculous.

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>