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Posts Tagged ‘Adweek’

JetBlue’s Premium Service Rollout Strategy: ‘Don’t Call It First Class’

jetblue-mint-serviceWe’ve been watching JetBlue‘s “Mint” service rollout campaign with interest this summer because it makes for a great case study in brand messaging.

The basics are these: JetBlue has, despite some colorful incidents, established a reputation as the “we all fly coach” airline for the little guy—an image reinforced by clever “we get it” stunt campaigns. The Mint offering toys with that equation by giving certain passengers on certain cross-country flights (New York to LA and, later in 2014, NY to San Francisco) a “premium experience”, but during the rollout, JetBlue’s comms team has taken every opportunity to remind the public and the media not to call it “first class.”

The web copy is telling:

Screen Shot 2013-10-13 at 11.45.15 AM

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Mediabistro Course

Presentation Writing: Design and Delivery

Presentation Writing: Design and DeliveryLearn how to use storytelling techniques and visual content to create and deliver successful pitches and presentations! Starting August 6, Amanda Pacitti, the manager of learning at Time Inc., will teach you the best practices for presentations, from using software like Prezi and Powerpoint, to writing your script, and using images, audio, and video to drive your points. Register now! 

Roll Call: Saatchi & Saatchi, ‘The Financial Times’ and ‘Adweek’

Michael Lee has been promoted to CEO of Saatchi & Saatchi Greater China. Michael, currently president and COO for Greater China, has over 20 years agency experience, most of it in China. He has played a key role in growing Saatchi & Saatchi with a range of new business wins and most recently being awarded ‘Creative Agency of the Year’ by China Advertising Magazine and R3. In this role Michael will lead the Saatchi & Saatchi offices in Shanghai, Beijing, Hong Kong and Guangzhou. Michael, who is based in Shanghai, will report to Chris Foster, Chairman and CEO for Asia-Pacific, based in Singapore. (Release)

The Financial Times announced the appointment of Darcy Keller as global communications director, responsible for all external and internal communications across FT Group, effective August 1. Reporting to FT Group CEO John Ridding, Keller also joins the FT Executive Board, which oversees the company’s global strategy and performance. She will relocate from New York to London to lead a global communications team based in London, New York and Hong Kong. Keller brings extensive media and communications experience to the role and has held a number of senior positions at the FT since joining in 2007, including deputy director of global communications, head of the global press office and head of communications in the Americas. Since 2010, she has served on the company’s Senior Management and Digital Executive teams, responsible for the FT’s digital and mobile strategy and growth in recent years. (Release)

Suzan Gursoy has been promoted from interim publisher of Adweek to publisher. She had the “interim” tag since February. Prior to that, Gursoy served as Adweek’s integrated advertising director, from 2010 to 2013. Before Gursoy’s time at Adweek, she oversaw business development for WWD. (FishbowlNY)

Will PR Really ‘Rule Native and Social?’

Today in No, We’re Not Tired of This Debate Yet news: Phil Johnson, CEO of PJA Advertising, wrote a story for AdWeek arguing that the whole “moving into creative” trend means that “savvy PR firms” can and should steal social media and native advertising opportunities away from their competitors in the ad and marketing fields — and that those other guys will need to imitate the PR model in order to keep up.

Johnson writes that “forward-thinking public-relations firms have been more adept than advertising agencies at grasping the strategic implications of content marketing”. In making this point he cites recent moves by Edelman and Weber Shandwick as well as Digital Influence Group, “a full-service digital marketing agency with social media at the core”, and Shift Communications, which has been bullish on social for some time.

He also thinks that PR firms have an inherent advantage because native advertising “is conceptually the same as placing press releases that look like independent journalism.” Hmm…

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The ‘Craft’ Beer Movement Is Really a Marketing Win for Budweiser

We love any chance to opine on one of our favorite subjects: beer. When sudsy stories also involve branding strategies, we get a little excited.

That’s why we had to tell you about this AdWeek piece and its simple thesis: despite the very real popularity of premium “craft” beers created by independent breweries, most of the most popular off-brand beers on the market are, in fact, nothing more than the products of Big Beer companies’ successful attempts to co-opt the power of a story that was never theirs to tell in the first place.

See, most of the craft beer guys don’t have the resources to mount nationwide ad/promo campaigns. A large portion of their brands’ identities and business strategies lie in unique packaging (Flying Dog‘s Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas-style artwork), product names (Stone‘s “Ruination Ale“) and ingredients/origin stories (Dogfish Head‘s “Midas Touch” includes golden grapes, thyme and saffron). It’s all about emphasizing the anti-establishment attitude that helps these small producers inspire brand loyalty among their fans — much of it powered by word of mouth. We call it DIY or grassroots PR.

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Mexico Rebrands Itself As ‘More than Margaritas and Mariachis’

Here’s a basic fact: Mexico is America’s number one tourist destination (and its formal name is The United Mexican States). At the same time, the country’s tourism board believes that many Americans don’t see the whole picture when it comes to our southern neighbor. In short, Mexico isn’t just about stereotypical Spring Break trips to Cancun and the requisite tanning sessions and tequila shots.

The country’s representatives want to change all that with an extensive rebranding campaign designed to focus on the more exclusive and luxurious elements of the Mexican tourism experience with the tagline “Mexico: the place you thought you knew.”

The campaign and tagline aren’t new, but we recently had the opportunity to speak to Gerado Llanes, CMO of the Mexico Tourism Board, about the latest elements of this countrywide shift in marketing and public relations strategies.

What is the primary goal of this campaign?

We want to convey the fact that Mexico is a lot more than beaches, margaritas and mariachis. Of course we are a spring break destination, but we want to more aggressively push the message about our luxury offerings.

For example: if you put all the hotels in North and South America together, you still wouldn’t have as many five-diamond locations as Mexico. We also have three of the world’s top 100 golf courses and the number one and two ranked spas in the world. Mexico also has many four-star restaurants that some people may not know about.

From business standpoint, we want to increase the average US spend in Mexico. We’re aiming for high-level consumers by saying “look and see what Mexico has to offer.”

How have you changed your marketing and PR strategies?

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Weber Shandwick CEO Says PR More Responsible for ‘Big Ideas’ on Strategy

Weber Shandwick CEO Andy PolanskyIn a new Adweek interview on the future of public relations, Weber Shandwick CEO Andy Polansky says that PR is increasingly “the steward of the strategy”. He believes that developments in digital/social media are the “biggest growth engines” for the industry at large and that they have increased the amount of power that firms hold when shaping messaging strategies for clients.

He makes some very strong statements about social media being “the core of everything we’re doing” and echoes Edelman‘s sentiments about an industry more directly involved in the creative process, saying that “Whoever retains the most creative thinkers will win market share.”

The topics covered in the interview are, in fact, similar to those Polansky addressed when we spoke to him after his promotion last November. In that post he also focused on the power that firms have gained through social media and the very “explosion of data” that has led some to create their own custom analytics tools. The Adweek quote that interests us most concerns the public’s perception that PR is all about “spin” when more firms are concerned with pushing and sharing a given client’s narrative through content and messaging than containing and minimizing the effects of its missteps.

These are familiar talking points to anyone who works in the industry, but we’re interested in specifics: in what ways have firms begun more aggressively managing media strategies for clients over the past few years?

Fortune Will Create Custom ‘Trusted’ Content for Brands

Fortune MagazineEarlier this week we made a big deal over The Washington Post‘s decision to enter the ongoing brand journalism sweepstakes by featuring sponsored advertorials on the front page of its website. That was an important step in the evolution of paid content, but today Fortune took the industry-wide shift in a slightly different direction: the magazine plans to write honest-to-goodness editorial pieces on behalf of its partners/advertisers.

What does this mean, exactly?

Fortune calls the project “Trusted Original Content”, and it will involve the magazine’s editorial teams creating Fortune-branded articles and video/other media content for marketers and PR pros to distribute on their own channels. So these pieces will bear the Fortune name and be written by real journalists, but they won’t qualify as native advertising. And brand reps won’t see them until they’re done–according to Adweek, Fortune’s editors will “have the final say”. Capital One will be the first party to participate by soliciting complimentary stories about small business.

Will promoting posts backed by the power of Fortune give a brand greater credibility? Time Inc. thinks so.

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Branding Win: Monistat Isn’t Afraid to Talk About Yeast Infections

When watching ads for “intimate” and “sanitary” products, you may notice a trend: while it’s perfectly OK to discuss erectile dysfunction and other problems exclusive to the male gender, distinctly feminine problems like menstruation, breast exams or the dreaded yeast infection don’t get a lot of attention. Ad and media execs tend to be “grossed out” and back away despite the fact that 3/4 of women experience candidiasis at some point in their lives–which means there’s a huge market for related products.

Here’s an example: each of the major networks refused to air this Ogilvy Kotex commercial because, according to Adweek, they just couldn’t handle the word “vagina.”

In this light, a recent survey sponsored by Monistat which found that most women still hold potentially serious misconceptions about these conditions makes more sense. So how can feminine health and hygiene brands truly connect and engage with audiences when big media says “we’d rather not?”

We recently had a chance to speak about the topic with Jennifer Moyer, VP of marketing for Monistat‘s parent brand Insight Pharmaceuticals, who had some very interesting insights.

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Using Xfinity is Easier than Un-Beaching a Whale or Giving Birth

If you’ve ever tried setting up new cable service, you’ve undoubtedly ended up cursing the cable gods as you struggled to find the best deal, tried to work four-hour-long appointment windows into your busy schedule, and wrestled with the great philosophical question of our age — to bundle or not to bundle?

We could use a whole host of colorful words to describe the painful process–and “easy” is not one of them. But now, Comcast‘s new ads from The Martin Agency claim that “easy” is exactly what you’ll get when you sign up for Xfinity service. And just to make it clear how easy, they’ve paralleled the simplicity of their service with the immense difficulty of some of life’s greatest physical challenges: giving birth; waxing Sasquatch; un-beaching a whale; and pitching a tent.

AdWeek recently named this series their “Ad of the Day“, and we certainly agree they’re worth a peek. Not only do they poke fun at Comcast’s own industry (and in a way, at Comcast itself) in a manner familiar to all cable subscribers, but they also promise customers the ultimate one-two punch: good service without the hassle. Most importantly, they deliver their serious message of “we hear you, and we’re going to give you exactly what you want”, in an easily digested, entertaining package while making us chuckle.

Check out the series, and don’t worry — we hear no Sasquatches were harmed in the making of these commercials. Read more

Roll Call: Hill+Knowlton Strategies, DEC PR, Zing, and More

Hill+Knowlton Strategies has announced that Amy McMichael Paddock, SVP and general manager of the firm’s Austin, TX office, will co-lead global client services with Vivian Lines, vice chair and co-head of client services. Paddock will work from Austin and report directly to H+K’s global chairman and CEO Jack Martin. In another shift, Bill Lauderback has also been named general manager of H+K Austin. Bill most recently worked as a senior advisor at Public Strategies, a role which allowed him to  counsel clients on strategic campaign development and execution with a particular emphasis on government relations. In his new role, he will draw on more than 25 years of senior-level experience in business management, government affairs, public policy and communications. (Release)

Australia’s DEC PR has named Kirsty McRae as client services director and “head of consumer.” In her new role, Kirsty will champion the provision of the highest levels of client service across the agency’s key clients and build on the agency’s successful consumer business. Kirsty has more than 10 years industry experience across consumer and corporate PR along with the attendant expertise in global and domestic market initiatives. Her client portfolio includes P&G, Unilever, Nike, Bacardi, Billabong, Danone, Premier Foods, BMW Mini and Intercontinental Hotel Group. (Release)

Zing’s two most senior executives, Robert McEwen and Preya McMahon, have created a second brand, McEwen McMahon, which will offer more corporate public relations services while Zing remains a consumer PR brand. “Zing will continue to focus on the beauty, fashion, lifestyle and entertainment work that has been its hallmark,” the two principals said in a release, “while McEwen McMahon will be more of a high-level consultancy, advising C-suite executives on internal and external reputation management issues.” (Release)

Huffington Post ad sales chief Moritz Loew has been dismissed by AOL. According to Adweek, Loew believes the dismissal was the result of a background check and an outstanding warrant from a 2003 DWI charge. A spokesperson from AOL told Adweek that “Recent information has indicated that Moritz’s hiring did not meet AOL requirements.” (Adweek)

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