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Posts Tagged ‘Alex Rodriguez’

A-Rod’s Flack Won’t Have to Tell the Court Where He Hid the Bodies

I got this.Just kidding. But baseball’s least popular player has certainly made his damage control strategy clear: deny, obfuscate, muddy the waters and blame everything on somebody else. And he’s just in time for our yearly roundup of PR failures!

In the wake of a judge’s rejection of Major League Baseball‘s attempt to force the flack to testify or be held in contempt of court comes an announcement that the man himself will “write” a tell-all book.

How much of the “full dirt of Major League Baseball’s tactics” will his ghost writer reveal? Maybe we should ask the publishers currently “battling for the real A-Rod story” (emphasis ours).

Not content to become a bestselling author, the Rod would like to act as documentary subject, too: he reportedly met with Cocaine Cowboys filmmaker Billy Corben (not the bald Smashing Pumpkin) to help make a feature film about his admitted use of illegal drugs battle to clear his name against the combined forces of MLB and the team that pays him.

A-Rod did, at least, get one thing right: he hit the charity golf circuit this week and found time to tell reporters that he’s “confident” he’ll be back in a Yankees uniform next year.

Our advice? Save your money.

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Baseball Orders A-Rod’s Rep to Snitch

Keep your head down.Yes, it’s Halloween, and yes, baseball season ended last night—but there’s some serious drama going on in the Alex Rodriguez case. This week, Major League Baseball subpoenaed A-Rod rep Michael Sitrick of Sitrick & Company, famous for boosting the profiles of shamed stars like Michael Vick. They’re trying to force him to say that he knew what he knew when he knew it about Florida steroid shop Biogenesis.

More specifically, they want him to hand over documents that he and Rodriguez supposedly took from the owner of the company, then pitched to Yahoo Sports in an effort to both obstruct the investigation and smear other athletes who did business with Biogenesis, thereby mitigating the damage done.

That didn’t work so well since Rodriguez is the only subject of the current steroid crackdown to fight the charges. He now insists he never stole the documents, and it doesn’t look like MLB has conclusive evidence that he did.

This is both a legal issue and an ethical issue, but those phrases have different meanings for someone like Sitrick, who has built his reputation on an ability to polish even the foulest client to a golden sheen. If that’s gonna be your shtick, this is one way to go about it. But if we were, say, someone who wanted to earn the genuine respect of the public rather than squash a lawsuit and sail into the sunset on our yacht while giving our former fans the middle finger…

A-Rod Follows Lance Armstrong and Takes the Easy Way Out

How much do you love me? A couple of months ago we gave Yankees slugger/celebrity boyfriend/yacht enthusiast Alex Rodriguez some totally unsolicited advice about the best way to deal with the steroid controversy threatening to ruin his already soiled career.

Now we have to wonder whether A-Rod even read our little blog post, because we’ve seen a glimpse of his role model and it looks a whole lot like pre-Oprah Lance Armstrong.

He decided to turn the tables on his accusers by filing suit against both Major League Baseball for “slandering” him with a world-record 211 game suspension and his team’s physician for “misdiagnosing” a hip injury in an attempt to prevent him from playing.

That’s a devilishly brilliant and completely unbelievable scheme right there.

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What A-Rod Should (But Probably Won’t) Do

Today in Ridiculously Overpaid Athletes Are People Too news, New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez is the latest beefed-up domino to fall in baseball’s ongoing steroid scandal. MLB commissioner Bud Selig decided to make an example of “Captain Rodriguez” with the longest suspension in the history of America’s Pastime.

The MLB Players Association appealed the decision on behalf of A-Rod, who is the only one of the 13 accused players to fight his suspension. Quite telling that the other 12 immediately ‘fessed up, isn’t it? The ensuing legal back-and-forth ensures that he will be able to wear a Yankees uniform for the rest of the season (which won’t last very long, considering the Bronx Bombers’ current 56-55 record).

PR to the rescue! According to The USA Today, Berk Communications President and “A-Fraud” publicist Ron Berkowitz posted a since-deleted tweet on Tuesday that read a little, shall we say, combative.

Hello Chicago!!! Lets do this!!! #fighting

—   Ron Berkowitz (@ronberk1) August 5, 2013

What was that all about? Well, in what one reporter called “an exceptional lack of self awareness,” A-Rod told the media “I’m fighting for my life,” strongly implying that Major League Baseball has it in for him. Poor guy.

So what will he do? And what should he do?

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Roger Clemens’ New PR Counsel: Levick Strategic Communications

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Its been a long road for star baseball pitcher Roger Clemens since his poor performance at a congressional hearing on steroid use in baseball 15 months ago. Now, the Daily News reports, Clemens is onto his third PR counselor, Levick Strategic Communications SVP Gene Grabowski.

Grabowski told ESPN yesterday that he knew Clemens was not lying when he told him he never used steroids because he “looked him in the eye.” The Levick SVP certainly has been busy lately, handling the Michael Phelps‘ bong mishap, Alex Rodriguez‘s steroid scandal, and KFC’s “ill-fated grilled chicken launch.”

Deadspin has more. Of course, there is always an ulterior motive. Clemens and his team feel the need to counter press around the release of a new book (written by four Daily News writers) titled, “American Icon: The Fall of Roger Clemens and the Rise of Steroids in America’s Pastime.” Ouch.

Needless to say, the Daily News writers are not impressed with the new spin. Wrote columnist Mike Lupica, “…once you get Clemens off his talking points, almost everything becomes a brain buster.”

UPDATE: Levick did not handle work for Rodriguez, Phelps or KFC, but rather was called to comment on them by the press. Also, in a comment to a post on Peter Himler‘s blog, The Flack, Grabowski wrote, “I know, the Mike and Mike [ESPN] segment I did is somewhat controversial. But sometimes these roles are thrust upon us, as you know. I try to do whatever it takes to help my clients. In this case, it meant going to bat for him on a national sports talk show.”