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Posts Tagged ‘Business Insider’

New Wall Street Journal Blog ‘CMO Today’ Has the Marketing Industry Covered

Screen Shot 2014-03-24 at 2.34.22 PMToday The Wall Street Journal officially launchedCMO Today“, its new site for marketing/advertising news directed at marketing officers.

Suzanna VranicaWSJ’s chief advertising editor, will run the blog with the goal of “[defining] what matters and what doesn’t in the chaos of today’s marketing business.”

With a full-time staff of five, CMO Today (follow them on Twitter) will devote plenty of digital space to the ongoing merger between digital and traditional marketing.

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Startup Founder Gets a Little Too Flirty with Journalist

The latest News You Should Know from Valleywag, aka “Tech Douche Daily”: a certain startup founder may have taken the phrase “media relations” a bit too literally.

Seems like Sam Shank wanted to thank Alyson Shontell of Business Insider for this article covering his “Uber for hotels” app Hotel Tonight, but he just had to make it weird…

Eww. We’re not quite sure why Sam Biddle files this story under “PR” since the agency that scored the piece would never suggest such a socially clueless move.

In short, this is NOT how you thank a journalist for good coverage.

Here’s Why Your Facebook Engagement Numbers Are Way Down

One fact we didn’t know: the average Facebook user still shares nearly four posts every day.

One fact we did know: no one sees any of those posts anymore, especially if that user happens to be a client who doesn’t care to pay for each update.

We’ll let blogger Derek Muller explain why in greater detail:

So, while your friends may well have reached peak reproductive age, that’s still probably not the reason your personal feed is all babies and weddings right now.

You can also blame this new engagement-based algorithm for actively pushing your client’s promo posts away from the eyeballs they pay you to earn. We sort of knew this already, but we do appreciate Muller breaking it all down for us.

Now that you mention it, we’re also glad we didn’t buy any Facebook stock.

(H/T Slate; the story original appeared on Business Insider)

Snapchat’s Spiegel Applied Some Heavy Spin to His Zuckerberg Bromance

ht_evan_spiegel_jef_130416_wblog1This morning we bring you the five words Evan Spiegel needs to hear, via the 2008 Internet:

Dude. You’re doing it wrong.

Spiegel’s non-apology on the Snapchat data breach was lame enough, but last night we learned that he misled a Forbes interviewer about the nature of his relationship with Mark Zuckerberg.

It’s a pretty basic progression, really:

In other words, he was so ready to make himself look good that he made himself look worse.

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In Which Dewar’s Responds to Our Post on Its Sexist Ad Controversy

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Yesterday we posted on an ad for Dewar’s Scotch that we found particularly annoying for its ridiculously obvious sexism; the fact that Business Insider later reported on the same story shows you that it got some traction in the old “mainstream media”. The brand has since removed the clip from YouTube in response to the uproar (which we attribute primarily to this great post by travel writer and whiskey specialist Fred Minnick).

To summarize: the “Baron” character in the ad was such a solid bro that he stepped in front of the unattractive woman approaching his friend at a bar; the voiceover copy portrayed that selfless act as the equivalent of “throwing himself on the explosives” to save the other guy. (For reference, urban dictionary and Jersey Shore’s “The Situation” define “grenades” and “land mines” as varieties of undesirable women, because ewww.)

We didn’t really expect a direct response to the post, but we got one courtesy of Dewar’s and PR AOR Nike Communications. Read it after the jump.

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IBM Gets Aggressive in Countering Bridgestone Lawsuit

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In case you missed it (yeah right), The Healthcare.gov debacle just provided the entire world with a painful reminder of the challenges inherent in IT projects.

On that note, here’s an interesting case we missed last week: IBM, a company known for keeping its cards as close to its chest as possible, has gone all out to address a lawsuit filed by former partner Bridgestone Tires.

ZDNet calls it “PR finger pointing“, and it goes a little something like this: after hiring IBM to help install SAP software, Bridgestone blamed the company for a “failed” launch and sued for $600 million to cover “fraud” and other expenses.

In the wake of such accusations, IBM chose to go on the offensive, calling the claims “exaggerated, factually wrong and without merit” and writing that Bridgestone “failed to meet critical commitments upon which the performance of IBM’s obligations were predicated.”

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The NFL Still Deserves Bad Press for Breast Cancer ‘Pinkwashing’

NFL breast cancer2As the month of October winds down it’s time to revisit what is becoming an annual controversy involving breast cancer, the National Football League and “pinkwashing.”

A year ago Business Insider reported that only 8% of the proceeds from the sale of the NFL’s “A Crucial Catch” breast cancer awareness products go to the American Cancer Society, and this year the same author followed up with a variation on the story, this time calling the total “shockingly small“. The league didn’t dispute these numbers but simply said that it raised a total of $3M from 2009 to 2012, which isn’t too terribly impressive for a business that expects to reach $25 billion in revenues by 2027.

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Most Major Industries Are Lacking in Female Leaders…But Not PR

Everyone with an internet connection knows about the lack of strong, highly visible female executives in the tech world. There’s a reason Sheryl Sandberg and Marissa Mayer stand out so prominently, and the recent firing of Business Insider‘s CTO for posting misogynistic musings on Twitter led many tech bloggers to reflect on the “bro culture” that dominates Silicon Valley.

It’s not just tech, though. The snafu over publisher Bryan Golbderg’s new “female-focused” web magazine Bustle showed that the media/journalism world still disproportionately consists of men catering to female audiences despite the prominence of names like Arianna Huffington and Tina Brown. In September, a software project created by an MIT grad student to measure the presence of women in journalism found a general lack of female voices in traditional media even though a majority of readers (and bloggers) are women.

When we saw yesterday’s New York Times headline about “a lack of women in top jobs” on a list meant to celebrate the most powerful women in banking, our first thought was: what about PR?

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In Which We Consider Business Insider’s ‘Top 50 Tech PR Pros’ List

It’s safe to say that this week’s story about the Business Insider CTO with a penchant for offending everyone in sight on Twitter didn’t help raise the company’s public profile.

Yesterday, however, brought the publication of BI’s “50 best PR people in the tech industry” listicle, which is a different sort of animal altogether. Rather than mock the PR discipline at large, BI took the opportunity to credit to 50 people doing it the right way in the tech field.

Of course any such list is inherently arbitrary, and we’re not familiar with most of the names on this one, though we can personally vouch for Brian S. Gross, John McCartney of WISE PR and Krista Canfield of LinkedIn. That said, here’s what we like about the post: every member of this crowd of 50 is doing his or her part to promote not just a client brand but the PR practice in general—and we could always use a little more good press.

We reached out to some of our contacts for comment on the list and encountered a common theme.

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PR Is One of the World’s Top 10 ‘Most Misunderstood’ Jobs

Do your parents understand what you do for a living? Should they, or do you want them to think PR is all about throwing fancy, Diddy-style parties and hanging out with local artists?

Today LinkedIn announced an unusual initiative called Bring in Your Parents Day, which they describe as “a global initiative designed to help bridge the gap between parents and their professional children”. It seems that the company is inviting its own employees to bring their parents to work on November 7th and attempting to encourage other companies to do the same so parents can get a better idea of what, exactly, their kids do for a living.*

Why should you care? Well, the page includes a study and a list of the “10 Most Misunderstood Jobs“, which just happen to include both “Public Relations Manager” and “Social Media Manager”. Surprise, surprise.

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