TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Coke’

3 Experts Explain How Brands Can Avoid a Sochi Games #PRFail

shutterstock_166713464

Lots of brands obviously want to promote during the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi. But they also want to avoid what happened to Coke and McDonald’s, which got a lot of bad press after gay-rights activists criticized their campaigns and hijacked the #CheerstoSochi hashtag in protest of Russia’s new anti-gay laws.

AT&T, on the other hand, just made news for becoming the first major company to actively speak out against those same laws and pressure other brands to do the same.

So how can brands create Olympics campaigns without running into the troubles encountered by Coke and McD’s? We talked to three PR and social media experts to get their opinions.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Mobile Content Strategy

Mobile Content StrategyStarting September 24, learn how to write content for smartphones, tablets, and mobile devices! In this online course, students will learn how to publish across multiple channels and manage the workflow, optimize content for mobile devices, and  engage with their audience across screens. Register now!

Pepsi Dressed As Coke for Halloween

Not much comment needed on this one. Clever work from Belgian agency Buzz in a Box.

pepsi_halloween

Two questions, though: why was the spot not all over social yesterday? And where’s Coke’s response?

Also: dig the reversal of the “L” and the “C” in the logo to avoid a copyright infringement suit.

Shocker: Carnival Cruise Lines Wins Monopoly’s ‘Battle of the Brands’

1393469_10151678047851517_1385101363_n-1If that headline seems like a mistake, we thought so too; especially when you consider that Carnival Cruise Lines, with all of its incredibly bad press of late (“poop cruise,” anyone?) went head-to-head with brands like Coke, Transformers and Electronic Arts in Monopoly‘s recent Facebook contest, “Battle of the Brands.”

Earlier this week, in an effort to promote its new game, the brand-oriented Monopoly Empire, Hasbro created a Facebook “Battle of the Brands” contest for its fans. The winner would be the first brand to rack up 5,000 likes on its #BattleoftheBrands Facebook post. The competing companies included Carnival Cruise Lines, Transformers, Chevrolet, Fender Guitar, Nestlé, Beats by Dre, eBay, X Games, Nerf, Ducati, Electronic Arts, JetBlue, Coca-Cola and Yahoo.

And, incredibly, the brand to come out on top was Carnival.

Read more

Diet Coke Has Taylor Swift and Pepsi Has ‘a Pleasing Aroma’

pepsi01

Two things we learned from Pepsi‘s latest Adventure in Marketing: there is a Scent Marketing Institute and the number two soft drink company just patented a “delivery system” technology designed to “[cause] a favorable aroma” as soon as you open each bottle. The purpose of this brilliant invention is to, you know, counter all the artificial chemical smells of the packaging and the terrible product inside.

Looks like the smell will come from some sort of chemical combo contained in a small gelatin capsule on the inner side of the cap. Remember that gelatin is made of cows, puppies and sunbeams, which means Pepsi will no longer be animal-free. That’s a PR problem waiting to happen, but at least the moo moos aren’t genetically modified!

This might beat Diet Coke‘s skinny Taylor Swift can for sheer ridiculousness. But is it dumber than the new “conforms to your hand” bottle? You be the judge.

Hat tip to Consumerist.

Mexico Isn’t Buying Coca-Cola’s ‘Healthy Lifestyle’ Spin, Either

It’s not just Michael Bloomberg, guys—our neighbor to the south doesn’t seem fazed by Coke‘s latest “soda can be part of a healthy, active lifestyle” message either.

As Coca-Cola looks to offset diminishing American sales by targeting other areas, public advocacy organizations within Mexico are running PSA campaigns designed to warn the public about the dangers of soda consumption. It’s especially relevant this summer: Mexico, which is second to the U.S. in soda consumption per capita, surpassed us in June to become the most obese of the world’s major economies.

See a pattern developing here?

Read more

Coke Finds Yet Another Creative Way to ‘Share Happiness’: A Can That Splits in Two

If it seems like we’ve been writing a lot about Coke recently, that’s because we have been; the cola giant has been on a marketing roll as of late, releasing one creative effort after another to support its concept of “sharing happiness” on a global scale.

The most recent addition to the happy lineup is the new “sharing can”, which breaks apart into two smaller cans of coke. Not only does it facilitate sharing (without sending germaphobes like us into a meltdown), but it effectively removes 50% of the guilt of drinking a sugary beverage — now you can split a coke with a friend (literally) like you can a dessert — twice the friendliness, half the calories!

Okay, that last part is ours, but we still think it’s pretty good.

 

 

Forget the ‘Slender Vender’; Now Coke’s Vending Machines Aim to Achieve World Peace

Coke has been doing some creative things with vending machines of late; the Diet Coke Slender Vender can fit in places no hefty drink-dispensing device has gone before, while a Coke-sponsored flag dispenser in a Denmark airport helped welcome people to the “happiest country on earth”. Now, it seems Coke has bestowed an even loftier task upon its vending machines: world peace.

In partnership with agency Leo Burnett, Coke createdSmall World Machines“, vending machines that function as soda-dispensing communication portals. In an experiment aimed at promoting mutual understanding and camaraderie between citizens of India and Pakistan, two countries engaged in long-standing religious and political disputes, one machine was placed in Lahore, Pakistan and another in New Delhi, India. The machines allowed people to see and interact with each other, and, perhaps most importantly, complete shared tasks. Once the tasks were successfully completed, the machines rewarded people’s amicable teamwork by dispensing a Coke.

Jackie Jantos, global creative director at Coca Cola, said that the idea of creating stories around shared experiences goes back to the roots of Coke as a brand that started at a soda fountain, which is in itself a communal experience. Coke’s website says: “In 1971, Coca-Cola taught the world to sing through its iconic ‘Hilltop’ ad. More than 40 years later, the brand invited the people of India and Pakistan – two groups used to living with conflict – to share a simple moment of connection and joy with the help of technology.”

Read more

Coke’s New Airport Stunt Welcomes Travelers to ‘World’s Happiest Country’

Coke has long associated its brand with happiness — even dedicating entire websites to the philosophical meaning of the word, and calling the contents of a can of cola “140 happy calories.”

Now, the company is taking advantage of a happy coincidence — the fact that part of its logo happens to look like the Danish flag — to welcome people to Denmark, recently voted the “happiest country in the world” by the United Nations.

In honor of the Danish tradition of greeting arriving visitors by waving flags, Coke’s local agency, McCann Copenhagen, created an interactive airport ad that dispenses flags. Coke says it’s purpose is to “let Coca-Cola and Denmark spread happiness together.” The below video of a case study shows people’s reactions to the machine.

Little kids and elderly people jubilantly waving flags as loved ones rush to greet them, all made possible by Coke. We’d categorize this as a highly creative branding win.

Pepsi’s New Bottle Is Ready for Its Close-Up

The public relations industry has all sorts of niche specialties and compelling areas of expertise, but for those interested in branding — and packaging in particular — the news that Pepsi is updating its bottle design is a big deal. Packaging geeks are like Star Trek fans; they take what they love very seriously.

And they should. Brands ranging from Heinz to Chanel to POM to Maker’s Mark define themselves at least in part through their packaging. In cases like these, the public can easily identify the brand just by looking at the bottle. Pepsi, of course, wants to be a youthful brand — parlance for a hip and carefree edginess that hopefully sells itself to one’s equally cool peers — and hopes to leverage that image with a new “asymmetrical” bottle.

Read more

Coke Clarifies: Social Buzz Complements Long-Term Sales

You’ve probably heard that everyone’s talking about Coca-Cola‘s social media reveal this week. According to the soft drink giant, the fact that more people are discussing its brand on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube doesn’t necessarily mean that more of them are buying Coke products. But maybe “How many people bought a Coke after retweeting a call to action?” is the wrong question to ask.

In an effort to clarify its points and counter the media’s collective freakout, Coke’s SVP of integrated marketing Wendy Clark wrote a blog post arguing that social does, in fact, play a large role in boosting brand perception and audience engagement–which leads to more sales.

Her point, of course, is that the fact that data can’t directly link the number of comments on a Facebook post to the number of people buying Coke does not diminish the value of said content. This kind of “buzz” is only one part of Coke’s extensive branding/PR puzzle, which uses earned, shared, paid and owned media to encourage the brand’s ultimate goal: driving consumers to buy more soda in the long run.

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>