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Posts Tagged ‘Conde Nast’

The New Yorker Editor David Remnick Comments on His Career, the Magazine’s Content and Cover Controversies

New Yorker Cover“While most magazines have their moments in the culture, The New Yorker has mattered a lot at various points in time,” said David Remnick, the magazine’s editor. New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute hosted a wide-ranging conversation with him on Tuesday evening.

Remnick shared his candid thoughts on his career, his editorial role, the magazine’s print and digital content and occasional controversies. While being The New Yorker editor is a once-in-a-blue-moon opportunity, many takeaways from Remnick’s experiences about career timing, managing work relationships, having strong competitors and staying relevant apply across positions.

Below are selected highlights.

Early career: “There were things back then called paid internships”, Remnick emphasized, (in his only reference to the ongoing Conde Nast internship controversy). He got an internship at Newsday, and another at The Washington Post. He also taught English in Japan and served as WaPo’s foreign correspondent in Moscow, competing for stories with Bill Keller of The New York Times.

He attributes his eventual switch from newspapers to magazines to the waiting room at his father’s dental practice. He spent time there reading magazines while listening to rock music. “The New Yorker was hard to grasp beyond the cartoons when I was little, but I warmed to it.”

Being named editor : After Tina Brown left, Remnick, who had been working at The New Yorker, became editor. He said he got the job, even though he had no prior professional editorial experience, after Sy Newhouse’s initial choice was nixed. As Remnick recalled, “they really needed an editor in a hurry. But the geometry of my relationships with other editors changed, and that’s still complicated.”

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Storytelling for Media Professionals

Storytelling for Media ProfessionalsStarting April 22, this in-person workshop will teach you the specific ways to incorporate storytelling into your personal and professional life. Students will examine the role of storytelling in business and put their newfound skills into practice with a series of improvisation, writing, and presentation exercises designed to help them uncover personal stories. Register now! 

Condé Nast Kills Its (Unpaid) Internship Program

MID-conde-nast-sunrise-226x300This morning WWD learned that its parent company Condé Nast has decided to put the kibosh on all that bad publicity by killing its internship program dead. The company gave no comment or explanation for its decision, but we have a feeling it might have something to do with the summer lawsuit filed by two interns angry over making “less than $1 an hour” at the company. At first Condé simply decided to stop paying its lackeys altogether, but the risk apparently remained too great despite the fact that an identical class action suit against Hearst didn’t go anywhere in the end.

It’s time to re-evaluate the concept of internships. They’re supposed to provide equal opportunity career paths for talented, ambitious young students who can afford to work without getting paid, but they’re more often just a way to get entry-level work done without spending any money on hiring or benefits or any of the other annoying stuff that comes with, you know, running a for-profit business.

The Department of Labor considers internships “employment” (which must be fairly compensated under the law) unless said positions meet a list of strict requirements, so maybe Condé is simply acknowledging the fact that its internships will never meet those criteria. The more likely explanation is that someone determined that the work isn’t worth the headache. No winners here.

9 Pointers for Building Branded Blogs

Gear Patrol Super Gear Featured Image The theme “If you build it, they will come” worked magically in the baseball movie Field of Dreams, but in the crowded blogosphere, only a fraction break through to the big leagues of major media brands. While The Huffington Post, Bleacher Report and Vice are well-known examples, many other blogs succeed on a smaller scale.

A “super bloggers” panel convened at Advertising Week in New York on Thursday, sharing their perspectives on editorial content and sponsored posts with moderator Manoush Zomorodi , host of WNYC’s New Tech City radio show. They included Ben Bowers, founder of Gear Patrol, Julie Carlson, editor-in-chief of Remodelista, Emily Schuman, founder and editor of Cupcakes and Cashmere, and Joy Wilson, founder of Joy the Baker.

While their blogs cover consumer categories like home design, baking, fashion and gadgets, their approaches also apply on the corporate side. Some areas below serve as reminders, while other issues like sponsored content are more recent.

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Condé Nast Says ‘Screw It, Let’s Just Stop Paying Our Interns’

They never learn. Or, rather, they learn that they can do whatever the hell they want. In the face of a lawsuit filed by impressionable young folk who made “less than $1 an hour” interning for W Magazine and The New Yorker, publishing giant Condé Nast has decided to double down and make it official: they no longer plan to pay their interns anything at all.

We’ll go out on a long, sturdy limb and assume that the company made this decision after a very similar suit filed against Hearst last year failed to proceed in its original “class action” form. The individually disgruntled interns involved in that case plan to press on alone, but Condé seems to think the whole thing’s a headache not worth having. This despite the fact that two guys who sued after working unpaid internships on the set of Black Swan won a settlement.

So there’s not a whole lot to see here, unfortunately.

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Roll Call: LIVESTRONG, Shout! Factory, Outbrain and More

The LIVESTRONG Foundation announced the appointments of Robyn Burchfiel as vice president of major gifts and Cameron Krier as director of government relations. Burchfiel comes to the Foundation with a wide range of experience in major gift fundraising and corporate management from her previous roles as director of gift and estate planning and director of leadership gifts at Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas. Krier’s expertise in governmental affairs comes from a career devoted to public service. As vice president for federal affairs, advocacy and public policy for the Texas Hospital Association, she specialized in leading the development and implementation of federal legislative strategy for more than 450 members. (Release)

Jeffrey Thompson has been named vice president of digital strategy and business development at Shout! Factory. He had been VP of digital strategy and business development at Conde Nast. In the newly created role, Thompson will lead development of digital strategies and digital video partnerships to continue growing Shout! Factory’s cross-platform initiatives that leverage its content curation abilities. He reports to company co-founder and president Garson Foos. (THR)

Kate Solinsky was named senior director of brands and agencies at online content discovery platform Outbrain Inc. She had previously been account director at Time Inc. (Revolving Door)

Russell Peck, campaign manager for North Carolina’s newly elected Governor Pat McCrory, joins Mercury Public Affairs as a senior vice president. Peck expands Mercury’s network in the South, opening a new office for the firm in Raleigh, NC. Prior to his work with the McCrory campaign, Russell served as the executive director of the North Carolina Republican Party. Mercury is a part of Omnicom Group Inc. (UnderTheDome)

More Changes for Condé Nast’s Communications Team

Conde Nast logoThis week brings more evidence that publishing giant Condé Nast is remaking its PR/communications team for the new year. Last month we reported on the departure of Maurie Perl: industry leading light, Barbara Walters confidant and veteran of such titles as Vanity Fair and The New Yorker.

Now we’ve learned of another big-name departure–and the arrival of some new blood.

Shannon Eis, who led internal and executive communications at Condé , left last week for a new role as senior vice president of corporate communications at top PR firm MMW. Eis previously worked as senior vice president at Kaplow Communications (and yes, she will continue making regular appearances on The Late Show With David Letterman as a parenting expert).

This week brings news that Patricia Röckenwagner has been named Condé Nast’s senior vice president of communications. Industry vet Röckenwagner previously served as senior VP of marketing and communications for McGraw-Hill Companies and corporate comms director at Paramount Pictures.

It would appear that Condé Nast is reshaping its communications team as part of a larger strategic shift. Expect more announcements to foll0w.

Big-Name Publicist Maurie Perl Leaving Condé Nast

Conde Naste vet Maurie PerlIn Industry Insider News, one of the New York media world’s biggest PR names has announced a major career change. Maurie Perl has a long history performing public relations work for some of the publishing industry’s best-regarded titles including Vanity Fair and The New Yorker.

Women’s Wear Daily goes so far as to call her “Condé Nast’s most powerful gatekeeper”; she spent more than two decades at the company performing PR duties for such names as David Remnick and Tina Brown and mentoring much of the industry’s younger talent. Before joining Condé Nast she worked at ABC News alongside Barbara Walters and others.

Brown says “She’s more than a publicist. She’s a consiglieri. No one can see all the angles like her”. Tough to find greater words of praise for anyone in the business.

Earlier this week an internal email revealed that Perl would be leaving as a result of Condé Nast’s decision to hire the Rubenstein agency for all media relations concerns. This move comes about because the company looks to further establish itself in “the scripted TV and feature films arenas”. Robert Green, executive producer of Huffington Post Live, will be the company’s new senior vice president.

No word on next steps for Perl, who has “no intention of retiring.”

12 Pinterest Tips from Magazine Pros

As a way of continuing the 12/12/12 theme this week, we’ve compiled 12 tips for using Pinterest based on the collective expertise of two magazine brands that have enthusiastically adopted the platform: Real Simple and Glamour.

At the MPA Digital: Social Media conference on Thursday in New York, Kathleen Harris, managing editor of RealSimple.com, presented lessons learned over two years of using Pinterest. She also noted that it’s “where the bulk of our referral traffic comes from.”

Later Mike Hofman, digital managing director at Glamour.com, appeared on a panel about Pinterest. He described it as a “vehicle for lifestyle inspiration, and said Glamour even “re-engineered our website to be more like Pinterest.”

“If you’re not on Pinterest as a magazine brand, you’re not relevant.” That was the assessment of another panelist, Dick Porter, EVP of media sales at Meredith Corporation. Pinterest isn’t a fit for every company or brand, but others can still learn from these magazine brands’ experience.

The advice below makes it appear easy, but applying these tips may prove more elusive. While the examples concern brands that almost exclusively target females, these pointers can also be adapted by gender neutral and male oriented brands.

Our twelve tips:

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Cubes: Conde Nast Shows Off Its Lucky Side

Conde´ Nast recently hosted MediabistroTV at its Times Square offices. Lucky magazine style editor and network television morning show contributor Lori Bergamotto walked the crew through Lucky’s offices revealing the hidden corners where nail polish and make up are put through their paces, colors and fabric samples are checked by the art department, shoes and handbags await their close-ups and racks of outfits hang around waiting for their models.

Take a look at all the small parts that make up a big fashion magazine like Lucky.

Next Thursday MediabistroTV premieres, “My First Big Break: Ken Burns.” You can view our other MediabistroTV productions on our YouTube Channel.

Does a Stylish Men’s Mag Like ‘M’ Have an Audience?

When we try to come up with sure-fire ways to make a big impression in today’s scattershot media world, the very first thought that enters our minds always seems to be “Start an upscale men’s fashion magazine!”

OK, not really—but Condé Nast has decided to take that step by re-launching “M Magazine”, a venture run by former New York Observer editor Peter Kaplan. Its first issue hits newsstands today followed by a big question: will anyone read it?

It didn’t work the first time—the title appeared in 1983 and folded during the early 90’s due to poor ad revenue. Kaplan sees the new quarterly as less of a fashion rag and more of a Euro-style intellectual journal—for American men who make over $200,000 a year. It’s very traditional: As Kaplan puts it, “M” is a “magazine to state the love of print” that runs on the power of ads by luxury titans like Versace, Dunhill and Louis Vuitton.

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