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Posts Tagged ‘diet coke’

Diet Coke Never Really Had a Drug Problem

Apparently, Diet Coke was just fake-dabbling in drugs; it never really had a problem.

You may recall that the “You’re On. Diet Coke” campaign attracted a bit of mockery back in March from a bunch of journalists who may or may not have written from personal experience.

We assumed that was the joke, but in the wake of such harsh media criticism Diet Coke seems to have grown both self-conscious and overly confident. They’ve been acting a little nervous and jittery. They want something new, something fresh. Just a little taste.

At any rate, the company decided to turn in-house and develop a new campaign…with a thirty-year-old tagline.

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Diet Coke Releases Skinny, Glamorous Taylor Swift ‘Sleek Can’

diet-coke-taylor-swift-hed-2013Sure, Diet Coke‘s Slender Vender might have helped consumers associate the drink with thinness, but what about those stout, hefty cans? Those things have “girth” written all over them! Never fear; the “Sleek Can” is here, and rather than “girth”, it has Taylor Swift’s name written all over it.

As part of Diet Coke’s 25th anniversary celebration, the brand has released new “sleek cans”, including one featuring Taylor Swift’s autograph. A prettier, thinner, more glamorous can featuring the John Hancock of a pretty, thin, glamorous teen idol? Gee, we wonder who the target market for this is.

A quote on the can reads, “If you’re lucky enough to be different, don’t ever change.” Unless, of course, “different” means anything other than waif-thin, blonde and dazzling, in which case, stock up on Diet Coke, girls! If those stout, homely old cans reinvent themselves in Swift’s image, you can too! Read more

Pretty, Thin, and Accessible: ‘Diet Coke’ Introduces the “Slender Vender”

How are people supposed to associate Diet Coke with thinness when the vending machines are so darn hefty?

At least that seems to be the thinking behind Coke’s new Slender Vender, the thinnest beverage-dispensing machine the weight-obsessed world has ever seen. The new design, meant to demonstrate that Diet Coke is “fit and elegant,” not only encourages soda drinkers to think thin, but even brings the beverage to places it’s never been before. In the promo below, we watch as the dainty, sleek machine is wedged delicately between park benches, hair salon tables, treadmills and, of course, bulky vending machines.

Oh, and cans? Forget cans! Those shapeless cylindrical containers are doing nothing for you — the Slender Vender appears to deal only in shapely bottles.

Pretty and accessible (and willing to dole out the sweet stuff to just about anyone that pushes the right button)? Add a cheerleading uniform to the mix and this vending machine is the girl we all hated in high school!

Marc Jacobs Designs Diet Coke Cans Now

Last week we criticized the recent trend in which big-name brands hire seemingly random celebrities as “creative directors”. While we still don’t understand exactly how Justin Timberlake will help “… define Bud Light Platinum’s identity in the lifestyle space”, another big brand unveiled some honest-to-God physical products designed by its new “creative director” today. Infamous fashion designer Marc Jacobs created these Diet Coke cans as part of the company’s latest rebranding campaign, called “Sparkling Together for 30 Years.”Marc Jacobs Diet Coke cans

Diet Coke certainly picked the right time to show its new face to the public: yesterday Jacobs marked the end of New York’s Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week with the debut of his new collection. This small reveal indicates that, for Coke, “creative director” does not mean “celebrity who had some time on his hands and will now show up at public events to hawk our products.”

What’s next for this creative partnership? We’re not sure–Jacobs has already gone topless in “pin-up style” ads for the brand, but there’s been no word on whether the “three bottles and three ad campaigns” to follow will include any of his trademark models or ridiculous outfits.

Most importantly, Taylor Swift is nowhere to be seen.

Taylor Swift Is The New Face of Diet Coke

Yesterday Coca-Cola finally addressed its nemesis PepsiCo by laying its promotional cards on the table and declaring: “We’ll see your Beyoncé and raise you a Taylor Swift.”

Like the Beyoncé deal, Swift/Diet Coke will be a “long-term” relationship between everyone’s favorite low-calorie soda and everyone’s favorite musical memoirist that will integrate Swift “into all key marketing efforts” for Diet Coke’s Stay Extraordinary campaign. Her latest album title, Red, even complements the brand. It’s almost like she knew this would happen…

We think we get Coca-Cola’s strategy here: Swift, despite being one of the world’s biggest pop stars, has a reputation for being close to her (overwhelmingly female) fan base. The video she released announcing the partnership and encouraging supporters to visit Diet Coke’s Facebook page is a good example of this personal branding aesthetic in action:

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Diet Coke Gets a Facelift

Beginning Sept. 1, the Diet Coke cans you know and love will look a little different. The new design, created by Turner Duckworth, first showed up on supermarket shelves last fall as a limited-edition package, but it will now become the regular face of the leading soda brand. As you can see at left, the familiar silver, black, and red color scheme will remain the same, but the classic logo has been cropped to emphasize the iconic serif “D” and “k.”

So why the makeover? Brand spokeswoman Kerry Tressler said the design is returning “by popular demand” after extensive market testing by Coca-Cola that began way back in August and September of 2010. According to Ad Age, “In a trial with Target, the test market saw volume growth outpace the rest of the country.” That’s pretty significant evidence that the new can may be a hit. “It wasn’t an accidental design or something that we just happened on,” said Katie Bayne, Coca-Cola’s president-sparkling beverages.

The new logo will not appear on bottles, only cans–but it will also make an appearance on a T-shirt designed by Miami International University of Art and Design student Gustavo Alonso. Target stores nationwide will stock the shirt to promote Diet Coke’s Young Designer Challenge.

Ms. Tressler wouldn’t spill the beans to Ad Age about the brand’s future marketing or customer outreach plans, but she did say that there would be more news in the coming weeks. We hope Diet Coke isn’t already thinking about going under the knife again–moderation in all things, you know?