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Posts Tagged ‘Facebook’

Why Facebook’s News Feed Changes Are Good News for PR

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In case you missed it, the folks at Facebook dropped the ultimate Friday Dump on digital agencies everywhere last week by announcing that they’d be tinkering with their super-secret algorithm yet again, giving unpaid promotional posts even less of a presence in users’ respective news feeds.

If we currently had the words “social” and “media” in our title, we might be a little worried — especially if they preceded the word “manager.” But we think this change is ultimately good news for PR. Here’s some language from the release:

As we’ve said before, News Feed is already a competitive place – as more people and Pages are posting content, competition to appear in News Feed has increased. All of this means that Pages that post promotional creative should expect their organic distribution to fall significantly over time.”

Translation for digital agencies: “We have you BY THE BALLS. Now pay up.”

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What Would Bill Do? Media Coach Bill McGowan Takes on the Week’s News

NYPOST

It’s time for another edition of our weekly series in which Bill McGowan, Clarity Media Group founder and advisor to executives at Facebook and Airbnb, offers his take on the week’s biggest stories.

This week, Bill addresses cultural upheavals in politics, technology and sports.

POTUS Over a Barrel or In One?

If you agree that there’s nothing quite so offensive as a gloating, chest-pounding  winner, then the Shameful Act of the Week Award must go to the New York Post for their depiction (please don’t use the word “artwork”) of President Obama wearing only a lopsided crown and a barrel with the screeching headline: “STRIPPED” underneath it.

As my old colleague (and lifelong Rupert Murdoch soldier) Steve Dunleavy used to say, it was “lower than a snake’s belly.”

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Facebook Sues DEA Over Fake Profile Pages

fb-dea

Facebook has tried, almost to a fault, to protect the identities of its users — as long as they’re real. See, for example, the site’s recent conflict that ended with the network allowing some users who dress as members of the opposite gender to use their stage names online.

The drama was based around fake profiles, which are highly frowned upon in Zuckerberg’s environment.

Recently, Facebook poked the Drug Enforcement Agency because it wants “assurances” that the feds are no longer using fake profile pages to conduct investigations. Read more

What Would Bill Do? Media Coach Bill McGowan Takes on the Week’s News

Rick Scott

Pic via  Joe Raedle/Getty Images North America

It’s time for the latest edition of our ongoing collaboration with Bill McGowan, Clarity Media Group founder and advisor to executives at Facebook, Airbnb, CNBC and more.

1. First, Bill takes on Governor Rick Scott and his problem with fans:

Scott Blows It with Fan-Gate: If Florida Governor Rick Scott wanted to make his Democratic opponent Charlie Christ hot under the collar during this week’s televised debate, he picked the wrong way to do it.

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What Would Bill Do? Media Coach Bill McGowan Takes on the Week’s News

SPRINGER

In case you missed it, last week saw the beginning of what will be a regular feature on our blog: comments on trending news stories from Bill McGowan, Clarity Media Group founder and media coach to top executives from Facebook, Airbnb and more.

Today, in the second part of our ongoing collaboration, Bill gives us his take on three stories that broke over the past week.

1. CNN canceled Piers Morgan Live in February after three years in order (we presume) to make way for such ratings winners as the network’s “constant coverage” of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. Morgan has made clear via various platforms that he was unhappy with the move, and this week he penned an “advice column” for The Hollywood Reporter in which he lectured his former employer on mismanaging his own show — which he claims “did OK in the ratings” — and  blaming the “stiff” Anderson Cooper for failing to provide a better lead-in.

CNN responded with a statement calling Morgan “sad” and he shot back by bragging about his new job as US editor of the UK-based Daily Mail Online.

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Will New, ‘Private’ Networks Threaten the Social Media Establishment?

social keyboard

The big story in social right now concerns privacy…or the lack thereof. As Twitter sues the U.S. government over data collection and Facebook announces plans to release an “anonymity” app, other networks have attempted to use the controversy to get attention.

Ello is the obvious one; brands, “influencers” and bored users making fun of the same have already begun joining the “ad-free” network. Snapchat still says it’s more private than its competitors despite admitting that those initial claims weren’t quite accurate and agreeing to “start a wide-ranging privacy program that will be independently monitored for 20 years.”

Then there’s Netropolitan, “the online country club for people with more money than time” (yes, that is a real tagline).

So: coveted headlines aside, can these upstarts really threaten the Twitter/Facebook monopoly?

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What Would Bill Do? Insights on the Week’s News from Media Coach Bill McGowan

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Readers may recall that, back in April, we had a couple of very informative conversations with author and Clarity Media Group founder Bill McGowan, perhaps best known as the media coach for top executives at Facebook, NBCUniversal and Airbnb.

In what will become a regular feature on the blog, Bill gave us his take on three recent controversies that made headlines this week — and the communications strategies behind them.

Think of it as a “comms week in review.”

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Tech Giants Can Handle Their Own Mergers and Acquisitions Now

google building

A New York Times piece published over the weekend reviewed the strategies employed by massive tech companies like Apple and Google when they want to acquire smaller companies — and there’s reason for both PR and the financial industries to be concerned.

It seems that the primary issue some executives consider when determining whether to buy certain other businesses is not their potential to make money in the short-term (or even the mid-term): it’s whether consumers will really use the products they create in everyday life.

Hence what they call “the toothbrush test”: how often will the average person use this company’s product? Will they use it a few times and get tired of it, or will it be a consistent presence in their lives?

The implication: an increasing number of tech execs think they can make these decisions on their own.

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Bad News for McDonald’s: Instagram Users More Engaged, Opinionated

MacDo

You mean they’re not really my “friends?”

A very interesting study published two days ago by social analytics firm Shareablee found that Instagram users interact with brand posts at more than twice the rate of those on the standard vanilla Facebook network:

  • The average Instagram brand post received 6,932 likes, comments and shares
  • The average comparable Facebook post received 2,396 such actions

This could be great news for brands — especially those looking to use the network’s nascent paid ad service.

Or maybe not. Take, for example, McDonald’s.

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OKCupid Co-Founder on Emotional Experiments: In 20 Years, No One Will Care

OKCUPIDWe’ve all heard about Facebook‘s ill-conceived “emotional experiment” and OKCupid‘s even better follow-up. While Facebook’s research only concerned slight tweaks in the algorithm that determines which stories show up in users’ news feeds, OKCupid experimented on total strangers who would later meet each other and go on what we call “dates.”

We’re interested in the story primarily because Facebook’s response was simply a blog post that didn’t serve as a very effective piece of self-defense. OKCupid co-founder Christian Rudder, on the other hand, has gone all out to defend his company’s practices as the kind of thing we deal with every day as connected individuals — whether we know it or not.

Last week, to follow up on his “yes, we experimented on people, now get over it” blog post, he gave an interview to TLDR, a podcast associated with the excellent NPR show On the Media (which we encountered via the also-excellent Press Think blog).

The fourteen-minute segment is well worth a listen–especially for anyone with clients in social media.

Some key quotes and takeaways after the jump in case you can’t listen or don’t have time.

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