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Posts Tagged ‘New York Giants’

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell Tackles Complex Issues and Demanding Stakeholders

“It’s a tough job but somebody has to do it” is an apt description of Roger Goodell’s role as NFL Commissioner. He’s worked at the NFL for 31 years, recalling that It took five years just to be former NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle’s Super Bowl driver.

Jonathan Tisch, New York Giants’ co-owner, interviewed Goodell at NYU’s Hospitality Investment Conference on Tuesday, covering a range of serious and fun topics. Below are excerpts from Goodell’s comments.

On football’s evolution and what’s at stake: “The business has changed from a sophistication standpoint. It’s a high profile business, so the responsibilities are higher. Sometimes I make decisions that aren’t popular, but I’m proud of those.”

On meeting football fan’s needs: “For the in-stadium experience we must do a better job of creating value, delivering options that customers want. We need to make it unique, safe and have the proper concessions. There’s also great potential for events like the NFL Draft, and we’re looking at more off-season events to create a year-round experience.”

On adapting to changing technology and media platforms: “Our biggest fear is being complacent, so we keep trying to find innovative solutions. A big piece is technology, since we ask fans to disconnect for a few hours, so we need to wi-fi the stadiums.”

“The biggest opportunity is meeting the continuing demand as technology changes rapidly. We’ll keep delivering NFL news on several different devices. As more content is available, we’ll have more ability to reach fans directly.”

On the 2014 New Jersey Super Bowl at MetLife Stadium, the first northern host city without a roof: “It’s a great opportunity to promote football and the Super Bowl. Football is designed to be played in the elements, which makes it special. It’s great for this community, and I have more ticket requests for this game than before.”

“We’re embracing the weather and the opportunity to keep fans warmer, and will give them electric warming devices. We’re prepared to deal with bad weather. We’re planning a Super Bowl Boulevard in Times Square, an outdoor festival that’s truly unique. The buzz and excitement created will be great.”

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Hey ABC: Why Michael Strahan?

We’ve been perplexed by this story for a whole week, so now we feel compelled to ask the inevitable question: Why Michael Strahan? ABC won’t confirm the change, but the rest of the world seems to think that the former New York Giants defensive end and current on-air pigskin analyst will soon become Kelly Ripa‘s new counterpart on “Live.”

We’re experiencing some mixed emotions here: Relief that it wasn’t Seacrest yet again tinged with a little sadness on behalf of Pat Kiernan and a secret hope that the job might still go to Greg Kelly of “Good Day New York,” also known as the Unlikely Voice of Reason.

But really, why Michael Strahan?

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Research: Some People Watched the Super Bowl So They Wouldn’t Be Clueless Monday Morning

With everyone still tallying the various successes of this past Sunday’s Super Bowl, we return to our question: Do the ads overshadow the game? According to a study from MWW Group, the answer is no.

The firm surveyed 400 viewers between the ages of 18 and 34 on Friday, February 3 and 71 percent said they were interested in both the game and the ads. The findings show that “advertising is part of the Super Bowl’s appeal,” said Michael Kempner, MWW’s CEO.

More interesting perhaps is that 61 percent said they watched the game to know what people would be talking about the next day.

So everyone’s need to be in on the conversation in some way — simply being in the know –can drive viewers, participants, etc. That little nugget is a reminder of the importance of getting the word out to audiences effectively.

[image Julio Cortez/AP Photo]