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Posts Tagged ‘Newsweek’

Newsweek Journo Responded to Every Pitch for a Week. You Won’t BELIEVE What Happened Next

newsweek

In a perfect world, every journalist would respond to all of our pitches, right? Even a polite “thanks, I might check it out” would be better than nothing at all, wouldn’t it?

Yesterday, Zach Schonfeld of Newsweek posted a piece in which he recounted his experience doing exactly that for a whole week.

Let’s just say it doesn’t sound like much fun.

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Tweetdeck Security Flaw Exposed by ‘f gwenifill’ Trend

social-inside-twitter-iconDoes your agency use Tweetdeck? Do one or more employees access/manage multiple client feeds through Tweetdeck? If so, then you should pay attention to this story.

Things got weird on Twitter yesterday as an astonishing number of media feeds tweeted the same thing: “f gwenifill”. None of the feed managers had sent this tweet, so there was a lot of confusion before things became a little clearer.

Turns out Kate Gardiner, a writer and media strategist who you should follow, once managed the feeds of several different news organizations under the Newsweek banner. While attempting to delete her previous accounts, she posted a test tweet that should have instructed her account to follow Gwen Ifill of PBS—but every account for which she once had the keys or APIs posted the message as a standard tweet instead.

As we understand it, this is the kind of user error that will probably never happen again in precisely the same way, but it illustrates a flaw in Tweetdeck: the app stores previous managers’ keys even after the passwords have been changed.

Stick with us for one more minute…

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Newsweek Got Sold And No One Really Paid Attention

For a minute, we were all paying attention to Newsweek again. But just as quickly as our heads whipped around when we heard that the title had been sold to IBT Media, the company that owns International Business Times, our heads whipped back the other way because Jeff Bezos bought The Washington Post.

Newsweek, which was meant to be revived by its association with Tina Brown’s site The Daily Beast, instead seems to be even more of a shell of the notable newsweekly it once was. For one, it stopped printing seven months ago and went all digital. Then, a number of notable staff left, including CEO Baba Shetty and editor Tunku Varadarajan. Finally, you had Newsweek owner Barry Diller saying publicly, “I wish I hadn’t bought Newsweek, it was a mistake.” Diller’s point was that a newsweekly’s time had passed at the rise of Twitter and other instant news. Sales pitching at its finest!

But the companies involved here would have us believe that this is a great sale and a great brand.

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Newsweek Print Edition Goes Out With a Whimper

Today, Newsweek editor-in-chief Tina Brown and CEO Baba Shetty announced that the magazine will fold its print operation after 80 years. In other news, if you want a video tour around their office you should check out our exclusive Newsweek/Daily Beast edition of “Cubes.”

Now get your big-picture questions ready: Is this the end of print? Is this the end of responsible journalism? Is this the end of Tina Brown’s obnoxious and gimmicky covers? (For the record, that’s no, no and a very hopeful yes.)

Yeah, OK. It’s not like nobody saw this coming. Here are the most important parts of the appropriately self-righteous statement:

“After 80 years in print, the newsmagazine adopts an all-digital format.

We are announcing this morning an important development at Newsweek and The Daily Beast. Newsweek will transition to an all-digital format in early 2013…

Meanwhile, Newsweek will expand its rapidly growing tablet and online presence, as well as its successful global partnerships and events business.

Newsweek Global, as the all-digital publication will be named, will be a single, worldwide edition…

…our business has been increasingly affected by the challenging print advertising environment, while Newsweek’s online and e-reader content has built a rapidly growing audience…By year’s end, tablet users in the United States alone are expected to exceed 70 million, up from 13 million just two years ago…

In our judgment, we have reached a tipping point at which we can most efficiently and effectively reach our readers in all-digital format…

We are transitioning Newsweek, not saying goodbye to it. We remain committed to Newsweek and to the journalism that it represents…

Newsweek is produced by a gifted and tireless team of professionals who have been offering brilliant work consistently throughout a tough period of ownership transition and media disruption. Regrettably we anticipate staff reductions…

Exiting print is an extremely difficult moment for all of us who love the romance of print and the unique weekly camaraderie of those hectic hours before the close on Friday night. But as we head for the 80th anniversary of Newsweek next year we must sustain the journalism that gives the magazine its purpose—and embrace the all-digital future.”

You got the point across. Good job. However, Brad Phillips (aka Mr. Media Training) noticed something missing from the statement—something that we think is extremely important.

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Revolving Door: ‘Newsweek’ cover, ‘Rock Center,’ and more

After last week’s much-discussed TIME magazine breastfeeding cover, Newsweek tries to drum up some chatter with this week’s cover, declaring President Obama the first gay President.

After being pulled from the schedule for the rest of May, newsmagazine Rock Center with Brian Williams is on the fall schedule. [via]

Us Weekly is coming to the iPad.

Rebekah Brooks, former CEO of the British division of News Corp, will find out tomorrow if she will face charges related to the phone hacking scandal.

TV broadcasters are taking on the new Barry Diller-backed Aereo service, which would bring televisions stations to paying customers. New York magazine has a big feature about Diller and Aereo this week.

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Revolving Door: Le HuffPo, NY Times’ Abramson to Debut at Davos, NBC Publishing eBooks, and More

NY Times' Jill Abramson

Le Huffington Post made its debut on Monday in France with Anne Sinclair as editorial director. Sinclair, a former TV anchor, is the wife of infamous former IMF head Dominique Strauss-Kahn, aka DSK. At the press conference Sinclair reassured the audience that there would be no conflicts of interest between her new role and her private life. (via New York Times)

ABC News‘ partnership with Yahoo! has spawned two new Web shows about politics that launched this week. The shows are extensions of long-running blogs from George Stephanopoulos and Jake Tapper. George’s Bottom Line debuted on Monday and Political Punch with Jake Tapper appeared on Tuesday. (via TVNewser)

NBC News established a new eBook imprint called NBC Publishing. The unit will release enhanced eBooks with videos inside, and the launch follows the media company’s success in the eBook business. (via GalleyCat)

Jill Abramson, executive editor at The New York Times, will make her grand entrance at the Davos World Economic Forum this week. She will be joined by NYT publisher Arthur Sulzberger, who is hosting a dinner on Abramson’s behalf. She will also lead a panel of women leaders in a discussion. (via Capital New York)

Newt Gingrich is continuing his attacks on the media. Last week Gingrich critiqued CNN for questioning him about his second marriage at the start of the South Carolina debate. After the Florida debate this week Gingrich complained that NBC did not allow the audience to clap, saying “Media doesn’t control free speech.” (via FishbowlDC)

Diane Sawyer was criticized by James Spann, chief meteorologist at Birmingham ABC-affiliate WBMA, for her report on the Alabama tornadoes on Monday evening’s World News. Spann took issue with Sawyer’s claim that there was no tornado warning, saying “This event was forecast days in advance.” (via TV Spy)

Click through for more media changes.

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Revolving Door: ‘Today’ turns 60, @SpinReviews, Top Media Pinners, and more

The January 6, 1964 cover

Today commemorates 60 years on the air. TVNewser went to the party last night.

The New York Times‘ public editor Arthur Brisbane was feeling the heat yesterday over his take on whether reporters should be “truth vigilantes.” A lot of people thought that was a dumb question so Brisbane has come back to reiterate that it is not. Jill Abramson has also responded.

A Ron Paul super PAC has written a press release calling for CNN‘s Dana Bash to be taken off the campaign beat. CNN replied: “The notion that Dana is anything but objective is preposterous.”

Spin magazine has launched @SpinReviews. [via Fishbowl NY]

Newsweek plans to recreate the magazine’s 1960s design in the March 19 issue to commemorate the season premiere of Mad Men. [via Ad Age]

Pinterest says Martha Stewart, Real Simple, and Better Homes & Gardens are top pinners. [via minOnline]

The Huffington Post has launched a Good News channel for inspiration stories. Jessica Prois, who also heads the Impact section, will edit the new channel.

Click through for more media changes.

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‘Vogue Italia’ Jumps on the Controversial Cover Bandwagon

Vogue Italia has run into a bit of controversy over the September cover, featuring the model Stella Tennant corseted and Photoshopped into a 13-inch waist. Who needs to breathe, eh? Am I right?

The magazine already ran into trouble earlier this month for a trend feature that referred to hoop earrings as “slave earrings” (it has apologized). Now the issue is whether this cover glorifies an unnatural and unhealthy female body image. The cover is meant to recognize Ethel Granger, who famously did have a 13-inch waist.

Vogue Italia joins Newsweek on the list of magazines that are generating buzz with some recent controversial covers.

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‘Newsweek’ Cover Causes Controversy… Again

Newsweek has done it again. It’s getting a lot of attention today for a cover photo that seems to have bypassed the editing process.

This week, Rep. Michele Bachmann is front and center with a wide-eyed, crazed expression and the headline “Queen of Rage.” Of course, her supporters have jumped to her defense with accusations of bias from the left. And the image, naturally, raises questions about sexism.

But Business Insider has it right when it says the cover distracts from important issues more than anything. And we wonder whether Newsweek’s cover image shenanigans aren’t going to do more harm than good to the magazine. Tina Brown is trying to raise the magazine’s profile, but she and the editorial team shouldn’t actively damage its credibility in the process.

Tina Brown Stands By Princess Diana Cover

The cover of Newsweek featuring a revived Princess Diana walking with the new Duchess Kate Middleton had many creeped out and asking whether it’s in “poor taste.” There was also talk of zombies, low-quality journalism, and even lower-quality Photoshopping.

Nonetheless, Tina Brown stands by the cover and the story, calling it “intriguing” and “very effective.” In an appearance on Morning Joe, she focused on the debate that the image (and others that were featured, including Di holding an iPhone) touched off rather than the ultimate appropriateness of the feature.

Mediaite interprets it as: “Sure, some people are saying they hate it but, hey, at least they’re saying the name Newsweek, right?”

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