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Posts Tagged ‘Nielsen’

Will We Ever Learn to Trust a Nielsen Rating Again?

mfXjziuRatings are Nielsen’s bread and butter, so you can imagine the upset when it was discovered that recent numbers may have been “misattributed.”

From the New York Times:

Nielsen, the television research firm, acknowledged on Friday that it had been reporting inaccurate ratings for the broadcast networks for the last seven months, a mistake that raises questions about the company’s increasingly criticized system for measuring TV audiences.

The error wound up benefiting one network, ABC, while negatively affecting the others, according to people briefed on the problem. In a telephone call with reporters, Nielsen executives would not confirm that it had resulted in added viewers for ABC, saying they could not discuss individual clients.

How does a company recover from such a taint? Read more

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Ratings Error Chips Away At Nielsen’s Credibility

multiple screensNielsen has admitted that the broadcast network ratings it has been reporting for the past seven months are inaccurate, favoring ABC while having a negative impact on the others. Even though it looks like the discrepancy is a small one, the damage to the company’s reputation could be much greater.

According to the company, the error in viewing totals is between .1 percent and .25 percent. The degree to which this could impact the ratings outcomes for different shows is yet to be seen. For instance, TVNewser has long tracked the competition among news broadcasts. ABC had been celebrating a rise above NBC, the first in five years. A revision could take that away. In other cases, the numbers might change slightly, but the outcome — first, second or third — would remain the same. Overall, Deadline reports that many of the larger outcomes would be unchanged.

These small amendments can have an effect on big advertising dollars for the networks. Moreover, Nielsen has been fighting a battle over its ability to thoroughly track TV viewership at a time of great audience fragmentation. That this error was made and wasn’t caught for so long has got some in the industry very upset.

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Roll Call: Edelman, French/West/Vaughan, Nielsen, and More

Edelman named Liz Lee its U.S. Digital Practice head; Andrew Foote will succeed her as general manager, Digital New York. In her new role, Lee will oversee all of the agency’s digital operations across 14 offices in the U.S.; she will report directly to global practice chair, digital Kevin King. Foote, respectively, will manage more than 140 employees in the digital section of the agency’s New York office and report to Jennifer Cohan, president of Edelman New York.

Recently appointed U.S. president/CEO Russell Dubner writes, “Liz will focus on bringing our U.S. clients and teams the next generation of ideas and experiences that drive social engagement”; the New York-based digital practice tripled in size under Lee’s leadership over the past three years and now counts Samsung, Axe, eBay, Citi and Crayola as clients. Foote joined Edelman digital in 2000; he previously held positions at Cohn & Wolfe and Peppercomm. (Release)

French/West/Vaughan hired Lauren Kinelski as associate vice president and promoted Chris Shigas to SVP. Kinelski comes to the Raleigh, North Carolina firm from Rémy Cointreau USA in New York City, where she was public relations manager for a portfolio of luxury spirits; she previously managed PR, social media and event sponsorship for evian Natural Spring Water and worked at Weber Shandwick’s consumer marketing practice. She will be responsible for strategic client counsel and management. Shigas, who has more than 18 years of PR and TV news experience, will provide management oversight of the agency’s growing sports & entertainment practice as well as continuing to manage various B2B and tech accounts. (Release)

Nielsen expanded its leadership team with the addition of Andrew McCaskill as SVP, corporate communications. McCaskill, who will handle media relations duties based in New York and report to CCO Laura Nelson, most recently served as SVP of Weber Shandwick’s New York office. He brings more than 15 years of experience to the new role. (Release)

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STUDY: The Public Trusts ‘Expert’ Content More Than Any Other Kind

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Given the endless talk of content and its newfound value in both PR and marketing, we shouldn’t be surprised to learn that the line between such materials and a given client’s business goals is rarely clear.

A newly published report offers us a bit more information on the subject.

The study, conducted by Nielsen and commissioned by inPowered—a company specializing in targeted content marketing distribution—considered the three major types of content and their effects on the purchasing process.

Its main conclusion? The public likes objectivity and reliability.

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Roll Call: Weber Shandwick, Rubenstein PR and Nielsen

Weber Shandwick announced the appointment of Vanessa McDonald as senior vice president and national practice leader, Consumer and Technology, in the firm’s Toronto office. McDonald will be responsible for the growth and management of client business in Canada, contributing to the agency’s leadership across its Consumer and Technology practices. McDonald joins Weber Shandwick from NATIONAL Public Relations where she led the Marketing Communications Practice. Prior to this, she headed the London and San Francisco offices of Ballou PR, a Paris-based communications firm. She also held the position of associate director, Marketing at Capgemini, one of the world’s largest consulting firms. (Release)

Rubenstein Public Relations (RPR) announced that Megan Wilson has joined the agency as an associate vice president. Wilson brings several years of public relations experience managing consumer accounts in the fashion, fitness, restaurant, and wellness industries with a focus on event planning, media relations, strategic communications and new product launches. In her position as associate vice president, Wilson will develop and execute dynamic publicity campaigns for RPR’s clients. Wilson joins RPR from Krupp Kommunications, where she advanced from an account coordinator to the position of account executive and Media Specialist over the course of three years. (Release)

Nielsen announced the appointments of four senior marketing and communications leaders – Greg Daniel as chief digital marketing officer; Laura Nelson as chief communications officer; Saul Rosenberg as chief content officer; and Marcy Shinder as chief marketing officer. The appointments are effective immediately. Daniel will be responsible for developing and implementing innovative marketing and communication strategies across digital channels globally, including web, mobile and social. Nelson will be responsible for developing and sustaining an overarching messaging strategy that builds upon Nielsen’s legacy and highlights the innovations that drive the business forward. Rosenberg will leverage Nielsen’s proprietary assets to lead global conversations on issues of import to both the company and its clients, while creating valuable content that enhances Nielsen’s value proposition to internal and external stakeholders. Shinder will develop and lead the overall global marketing strategy and oversee Nielsen’s brand evolution, commercial go-to-market strategies, partnerships, and channel execution, including events, advertising and creative services. (Release)

Study: While Consumers Still Trust Word-of-Mouth Most, Owned Advertising Is Gaining Ground

images-2It’s no surprise that people are more likely to base purchasing decisions on the personal recommendations of individuals they know and trust than on commercial advertisements. In fact, according to a new study by Nielsen, 84 percent of consumers around the world trust word-of-mouth recommendations from friends and family (a form of earned media) above all other sources of advertising.

While it’s unlikely the public will ever value branded messages more highly than the opinions of those closest to them, that doesn’t mean owned advertising isn’t effective. In fact, the same study shows that most forms of paid advertising are actually gaining ground when it comes to winning the trust of consumers.

The study found that 69 percent of global respondents trust owned advertising in the form of content and messaging on brand websites, making it the second most-trusted advertising source in 2013, up from a fourth-place ranking in 2007.

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CSR Is More Valuable Than Ever…or Is It?

Everyone agrees that CSR efforts are extremely important for big-name corporate clients, right?

No, seriously: we don’t know the answer to that question, and it all comes back to the biggest challenge in the industry: drawing a solid line between point A and point $.

First: The results from data king Nielsen’s latest Global Survey on Corporate Social Responsibility have already inspired headlines about CSR cementing its place as a crucial element of the big name PR equation.

Its basic finding: 50% of consumers surveyed in 58 countries say they’re willing to pay more for goods and services from companies that have “implemented programs to give back to society.” That number increased in ¾ of the countries surveyed, rising 5% in total since 2011. And the “yes” votes were highest in the crucial under-30 demo.

No surprises there. The only finding that we didn’t expect is the 12-point increase in pro-CSR sentiment among the 40-45 demo. Seems like CSR’s value has become clearer to all parties, no?

Maybe.

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Just What Is the Relationship Between Twitter and TV?

Marking another evolutionary step in the dynamics between the public and the ways we consume information, Nielsen has released its first survey measuring the impact of Twitter on TV audiences, and vice versa.

The study didn’t unearth any groundbreaking revelations. That’s the funny thing about studies meant to mine us, the public, for information: We’re not surprised by the things we do. The data from Nielsen’s “Twitter Causation Study” reveals that 29 percent of the time Twitter does in fact “meaningfully” affect TV ratings, particularly unscripted programming such as reality TV shows and sports coverage.

Anyone who has ever live tweeted the Oscars, the Super Bowl, or America’s Got Talent knows the appeal of being able to riff on funny, inspiring or entertaining moments of spontaneity. It’s fun, and the perfect example of how our lives constantly involve multitasking. We facebook the stuffed flounder at our favorite restaurant. We instagram holding hands with a lover. And, yes, we tweet while watching TV.

That’s just where we are. As PR professionals, our job is to figure out where all of this is going. So it’s smart to measure how social media and TV are evolving together, particularly since TVs are basically morphing into computers. Will Twitter mean that crowdsourcing is the future of successful programming? Or is there any future at all for TV? Just where is all of this heading?

Any ideas?

Twitter Buzz Helps Boost TV Ratings

The biggest PR/marketing story of the week so far involves Coca-Cola‘s surprising announcement that social media “buzz” doesn’t translate to short-term boosts in sales. On the television front, however, research comes to the opposite conclusion: yesterday we learned, via our sister blog Lost Remote, that Nielsen finally released a yearlong study firmly tying Twitter mentions to increased ratings for popular shows.

How does that relationship work? Let’s check out the numbers:

The Twitter effect is least influential on season premieres. an 8.5% increase in buzz (or related tweets by volume) leads to a 1% bounce in viewership among the 18-34 set, while a 14% increase creates the same gains among viewers aged 35-49. For midseason episodes, however, the numbers are more impressive: the amount of buzz required to create a similar 1% ratings bump is almost half the size for episodes airing midway through the season.

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Nielsen and Twitter Team Up to Measure Social TV

The present is a great time to be in the public relations industry: never before have so many people done so many things while in contact with so many others.

Thanks to social media and the continuous miracle that is technology, we never do anything alone anymore (with a few obvious exceptions, ahem).

There was a time when television was a passive pursuit that involved tuning into a favorite program and ignoring the rest of the world. That dynamic, however, has changed. Watching TV has become an active–even interactive–experience.

So it makes perfect sense for TV ratings monolith Nielsen to join forces with Twitter, creating a new ratings system that will generate metrics for viewers who comment on TV shows and those people who read or interact with said comments.

It’s fun to open a bottle of red wine and log onto Twitter while movie stars walk down the red carpet to accept awards in clothing worth more than your apartment. It’s entertaining, cathartic and always good for a laugh.

But if the Oscars aren’t your thing, there is always the NFL, which suffered a major public relations disaster this weekend as the league’s less-informed (and, let’s be honest, flat-out racist) fans took to Twitter to vent their displeasure about President Obama’s speech in Newtown, CT, taking precedence over the New England Patriots vs. San Francisco 49ers game. Wow. Not exactly the image the NFL wants for its fans.

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