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Posts Tagged ‘Oscars’

Arby’s Spent $44K on Pharrell’s Silly Hat (for Charity)

In a little stunt that almost got lost in the Oscars noise as everyone and his mother (literally) shared Ellen’s selfie, Arby’s decided to buy the brown, oversized fedora that won Pharrell so much attention on Grammy night for a $44,100 steal via eBay. You know, the Vivienne Westwood one that he supposedly bought in tribute to late producer Malcolm McLaren and his 1982 classic “Buffalo Gals.”

The one that looked exactly like the black hat he wore at the Oscars last night.

As if the guy didn’t already get enough attention…

Some details after the jump.

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NASA Uses Gravity Oscar Wins for Promo Opp

Last night Ellen went viral, Pink went over the rainbow, Bette Midler went way over the top and Alfonso Cuaron went home with the Best Director award for Gravity, aka George Clooney’s Abbreviated Mid-life Crisis. While the film didn’t win Best Picture, it did score seven statues—and NASA took the opportunity to show us once again why it rules social.

The team clearly predicted at least one win for Cuaron’s space odyssey, using the hashtag #RealGravity to remind the public once again that it does some pretty cool stuff out there in space with another set of impressive images.

The feed ran choice visuals for each of Gravity’s seven wins and more.

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Here Are All The Things You’ll Need If You Want To Get Your Client A Record-Breaking Tweet

ICYMI because Twitter was having technical difficulties with all that Oscar action: Ellen DeGeneres just surpassed President Obama for the most retweeted tweet ever in the history of the world. Don’t know how you could have missed it since it’s been shared more than 1.7 million times, but just in case you’re flagging a bit (we’ve passed the three hour mark), here it is:

ellen tweet

 

So what exactly do you need to have a record-breaking tweet? Glad you asked.

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Expect a Lot of Sponsored Tweets and ‘Experiential Marketing’ During the Oscars

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Vanity Fair publisher Edward J. Menicheschi tells Stuart Elliott of The New York Times that “Oscar night is Vanity Fair’s Super Bowl“, and the mag will go all out this year to prove it.

The brands sponsoring the awards and the top two magazines covering them (VF and People) plan to stage “events” rather than simple advertisements or social campaigns. What will those events encompass?

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SeaWorld Breathes a Sigh of Relief As Blackfish Shut Out of Oscar Nominations

So the Oscar nominations came out today, and we have to say: Jonah Hill‘s come a long way since Knocked Up.

We also agree with the Orlando Sentinel: there’s little doubt that SeaWorld execs and company reps were anxious about today’s announcement and even less doubt that they’re glad Blackfish didn’t get the nod for Best Documentary Feature.

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And yes, that’s definitely why they chose this week to announce that they’d broken attendance and revenue records in 2013.

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Just What Is the Relationship Between Twitter and TV?

Marking another evolutionary step in the dynamics between the public and the ways we consume information, Nielsen has released its first survey measuring the impact of Twitter on TV audiences, and vice versa.

The study didn’t unearth any groundbreaking revelations. That’s the funny thing about studies meant to mine us, the public, for information: We’re not surprised by the things we do. The data from Nielsen’s “Twitter Causation Study” reveals that 29 percent of the time Twitter does in fact “meaningfully” affect TV ratings, particularly unscripted programming such as reality TV shows and sports coverage.

Anyone who has ever live tweeted the Oscars, the Super Bowl, or America’s Got Talent knows the appeal of being able to riff on funny, inspiring or entertaining moments of spontaneity. It’s fun, and the perfect example of how our lives constantly involve multitasking. We facebook the stuffed flounder at our favorite restaurant. We instagram holding hands with a lover. And, yes, we tweet while watching TV.

That’s just where we are. As PR professionals, our job is to figure out where all of this is going. So it’s smart to measure how social media and TV are evolving together, particularly since TVs are basically morphing into computers. Will Twitter mean that crowdsourcing is the future of successful programming? Or is there any future at all for TV? Just where is all of this heading?

Any ideas?

What Happened to The Onion’s Twitter Feed Last Night?

We generally love The Onion for its hilarious headlines and The AV Club‘s great arts coverage (no, we never actually read the articles, but we’re not the only ones). But in the midst of last night’s Oscars ceremony, between Seth MacFarlane‘s musical boob jokes and Jennifer Lawrence‘s wardrobe malfunction, the magazine’s Twitter feed dropped this stunner:

We don’t even know how to respond except to say: what the hell? Sure, MacFarlane was a little out of line when he said–about a nine-year-old girl, mind you–that “it’ll be 16 years before she’s too young for Clooney”. But this was just ridiculous. Was it supposed to be funny? We hope, for the sake of whoever posted it, that he was very drunk at the time (we’re about 99.9% sure it was a he, because no lady we know would ever use that word in public).

We can’t say that we’re offended on her behalf like Wendell Pierce, aka Bunk on The Wire:

But this was definitely the worst attempt at humor we’ve ever seen on behalf of The Onion. And we have a feeling they’ll be issuing an official apology by the end of the day.

Oscar Voters Don’t Care for PR Pros or Their Swag Bags

The fact that Crash, The English Patient and Forrest Gump beat Brokeback Mountain, Fargo and Pulp Fiction for Best Picture should be evidence enough to convince anyone that the Oscars are all about industry politics and aggressive PR/marketing campaigns. But this week’s interview with a nameless senior Academy Awards voter (you know, one of the guys who actually picks the winners) in The Hollywood Reporter confirms everything you thought you knew. Here are his revealing, highly opinionated thoughts on various topics:

On PR pros and swag bags:

“I’ve gotten books, cookbooks and just about everything short of Lincoln condoms. It’s ridiculous”.

We assume it was a Beasts of the Southern Wild cookbook containing nothing but gumbo recipes.

On Best Original Song:

“This is no-brainer city: If ‘Skyfall’ does not win I will fillet my next-door neighbor’s dog.”

We like Adele; we also like dogs. We’re conflicted.

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Publicists Rush to Get Late Colleagues Mentioned on Oscar Night

Ernest BorgnineWe loved Nora Ephron, Ernest Borgnine and Charles Durning as much as the next guy, but we’re still a little sad to learn that the friends and colleagues of the film industry’s late, great publicists have to struggle to get their names mentioned during Oscar night’s obituary segment. People like Lois Smith worked behind the scenes to shape the careers of some of the biggest names in the business! It’s not like they were boom operators or best boys, right? (We kid, we kid.)

Nielsen and Twitter Team Up to Measure Social TV

The present is a great time to be in the public relations industry: never before have so many people done so many things while in contact with so many others.

Thanks to social media and the continuous miracle that is technology, we never do anything alone anymore (with a few obvious exceptions, ahem).

There was a time when television was a passive pursuit that involved tuning into a favorite program and ignoring the rest of the world. That dynamic, however, has changed. Watching TV has become an active–even interactive–experience.

So it makes perfect sense for TV ratings monolith Nielsen to join forces with Twitter, creating a new ratings system that will generate metrics for viewers who comment on TV shows and those people who read or interact with said comments.

It’s fun to open a bottle of red wine and log onto Twitter while movie stars walk down the red carpet to accept awards in clothing worth more than your apartment. It’s entertaining, cathartic and always good for a laugh.

But if the Oscars aren’t your thing, there is always the NFL, which suffered a major public relations disaster this weekend as the league’s less-informed (and, let’s be honest, flat-out racist) fans took to Twitter to vent their displeasure about President Obama’s speech in Newtown, CT, taking precedence over the New England Patriots vs. San Francisco 49ers game. Wow. Not exactly the image the NFL wants for its fans.

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