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Posts Tagged ‘Serena Williams’

This Serena Williams Clip Looks A Lot Like The One Gisele Bundchen is Starring In


We didn’t need to see tennis champ Serena Williams working out to know that she does. But marvel folks — MARVEL! — at the arms, the six pack, the high knees… Incredible.

No this isn’t a Nike ad. It’s an ad for Beats by Dr. Dre‘s new wireless headphones. At this point, we know that Beats are the choice headphones for athletes around the world. FIFA literally had to tell them to steer clear of the World Cup. But it’s interesting that an audio company would choose to build these relationships with athletes rather than, say, putting lots of music stars in its marketing.

It’s particularly interesting when you consider that an actual athletic wear company chose to sign a model to its spokesperson lineup rather than adding to its roster of athletes.

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Pat O’Brien Tells How to Survive a Public Scandal: Admit, Apologize, Advance

Pat O'BrienGiven their recent cringe-worthy non-apologies, perhaps Serena Williams and Paula Deen can learn something about handling public scandals from Pat O’Brien, co-host of Fox Sports Primetime.

O’Brien suffered his share of embarrassment back in 2005, when the drunken voice-mail messages he left a woman were leaked onto the Internet. Now, he’s more than willing to dish out some advice on how to rebound.

“I say this all the time: the best way to handle if you did something is to admit it. Cover-ups always worsen the crime. And we’re talking about low-level scandals here, obviously, not murder or anything. I always say the three A’s: admit, apologize, advance,” he told Mediabistro for its So What Do You Do? interview. “I talk to a lot of people in trouble — politicians, celebrities — they will call me and ask what to do. And that’s what I tell them. Get in front of the first camera you can find and admit it if you did it. And apologize to somebody and move on.”

For the full interview, read So What Do You Do, Pat O’Brien, Co-Host of Fox Sports Primetime?

 

Second Serving: Serena Williams Shows Paula Deen How to Apologize

REUTERS/Sergio MoraesThe entire country watched in horror this month as Paula Deen’s deep-fried, butter-soaked career came crashing down in a mess of outrageous statements and one of the most painful non-apologies we’ve ever had the misfortune to witness.

Mrs. Deen’s fall was so epic, in fact, that it distracted us from another perfectly served case study in poor media relations. This one came courtesy of clay court champ Serena Williams, who ruined what should have been a complimentary Rolling Stone profile with a few ill-advised comments and a passive-aggressive “apology.”

While visiting a nail salon with reporter Stephen Rodrick, Williams saw a news report about the Steubenville, Ohio rape case that sent two high school football stars to jail and led to a PR fail for CNN when anchors Poppy Harlow and Candy Crowley appeared to express more sympathy for the rapists than their victim.

Serena said of the perpetrators: “Do you think it was fair, what they got? They did something stupid, but I don’t know.” Beyond classifying the rape of a 16-year-old girl as “something stupid” and wondering whether the offenders were punished too harshly, Williams also had some less-than-flattering words for the victim:

“I’m not blaming the girl, but…why was she that drunk where she doesn’t remember? She’s lucky… she shouldn’t have put herself in that position, unless they slipped her something, then that’s different.”

Did she really need to throw a “but” in there?

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New FTC Guidelines Go Into Effect Tomorrow; Social Media Campaigns Continue Unabated

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The FTC “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising,” officially go into effect tomorrow.

That being said, the changes have not slowed down so called “word of mouth” programs, especially by retailers in full holiday sales mode. “Don’t expect the FTC’s new guidelines on product endorsements to put a damper on social-media efforts,” wrote Advertising Age‘s Michael Bush today, citing numerous agency and internal brand marketers.

For example, blogger Melanie Notkin — known as Savvy Auntie — posted numerous Twitter updates from her sponsor JC Penny over the weekend and into today. Not all contained disclosure. Notkin herself admits to the rules being vague. “I don’t know. I try my best to make it clear,” she tweeted, in regards to if she only has to disclose her sponsor once, then is free to tweet and blog away with no disclosure.

Richard Cleland, Assistant Director of the FTC’s Division of Advertising Practices, told our sibling blog AgencySpy last Wednesday, in reference to tweets from tennis star Serena Williams: “When it is clear from the context of a communication that the celebrity is being paid, an additional disclosure is not required.” At this point, it seems the only thing that is clear is that everything is unclear. Marketers and bloggers alike should err on the side of caution, and it could be that “some will get screwed and some won’t” as one source put it to us this morning.

Did The FTC Just Open Up Even More of a Slippery Slope on Disclosure?

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As our brother blog AgencySpy reports, it seems there is even more muddiness around the FTC’s “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising,” which were recently updated to include social media channels.

Case in point: the above Tweets by tennis star Serena Williams. Williams has been a celebrity brand ambassador for Nabisco for more than a year. And one of her Tweets does state that she is “shooting a campaign” for the brand. However, not all of Williams’ 1 million plus followers may know that she is a paid endorser, especially if they see the second Tweet out of context.

Richard Cleland, Assistant Director of the FTC’s Division of Advertising Practices, told AgencySpy: “Although we do not generally comment publicly about ongoing advertising campaigns, it seems pretty clear that Serena Williams’ tweet about Nabisco Calorie Pack is sponsored advertising. (She says that she is shooting a campaign for Nabisco). When it is clear from the context of a communication that the celebrity is being paid, an additional disclosure is not required.”

It seems the takeaway here is: you have to disclose, except when you don’t have to.