TVNewser Show TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Thanksgiving’

What the PRNewser Gang Is Thankful for in 2013

PR Turkeys

Tomorrow is the big day. A time when your humble PRNewser gang — him, her, her and yours truly — have a chance to reflect upon the overdose of tryptophan, the near-mauling of family members and how, exactly, one can resist the temptation to take an Instagram of everyone’s drunk Uncle Eddie (who tries to show off his “turkey leg” during the blessing of the meal).

The question came up during our morning “Soooo…whatchu gonna write about” meeting: what we are thankful for this year?

Sure, family, friends and a tank full of gas, but more specifically, what in this beloved industry of integrated flackdom are we most appreciative for in thanking sweet baby Jesus in 2013? Here’s our list. We’d love to hear yours in the comments after the jump…

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Storytelling for Media Professionals

Storytelling for Media ProfessionalsStarting April 22, this in-person workshop will teach you the specific ways to incorporate storytelling into your personal and professional life. Students will examine the role of storytelling in business and put their newfound skills into practice with a series of improvisation, writing, and presentation exercises designed to help them uncover personal stories. Register now! 

Starbucks Joins the Black Friday Black Eye to the Holidays

Kinda says it all to me after this holiday buzzkill news

Kinda says it all to me after this holiday buzzkill news

Sure, there’s a Starbucks on every corner. If you don’t believe me, listen to the great Lewis Black explain it.

Now, I understand Starbucks thinks it is a retail giant, but it’s not. Admit it, O’ siren of the coffee bean. You sell addiction in a nicely tight package of prepubescent angst.

Your smarmy baristas may be happy to provide some fattening lemon, pumpkin or other fru-fru bread, but you are placed on every street corner in the known world to sell coffee.

Your PR is for coffee. Your products are known as coffee. Your bottom line is laced in it.

So, far be it from me — who just loves all this Thanksgiving Thursday / Black Friday hurry-hurry-sell-till-you-puke-mess — to allow a moment like this to go by without a comment of snark. But Santa has decided that Starbucks would be better served as a big box retail store than a depot for hipsters ogling over each other’s skinny jeans and graphic tees.

According to the ConsumeristStarbucks’ Black Friday deal is $65 for a stainless steel tumbler that comes with an entire month’s worth of free espresso-based beverages.

Well, dip me in a caramel macchiato and call me java mama. I hope this comes with an appointment to an internist because your damn liver and kidneys may have something for you by New Years.

STUDY: People Aren’t Getting Self-Handsy During the Holidays

Jerking off all time lowYesterday, we brought you a story about PS4 and its latest “partner” in providing kids an ultimate gaming experience. And as filthy as I felt writing that thing, would you believe I found more?

Although I had to filter for images and stories with extreme heedfulness, would you believe the people that brought you free videos of BBWs doing the Harlem Shake on an actual Globetrotter have a real study out?!

Get this: According to the Pornhub “study,” no one is stuffing their turkey, yanking their mistletoe or putting a cornucopia on their Yuletide log during the holidays, if you know what I mean.

Hey, this is real news, flacks. I just report it!

Read more

This Is Why All The Backlash in the World Won’t Put a Stop To Thanksgiving Day Shopping

target black fridayMore and more around this pre-Thanksgiving time, the media is filled with stories about retailers opening their doors for Black Friday earlier than the year before. Then there are stories about the backlash — from the employees who say their Thanksgiving Day celebrations are hampered by the need to report to a job that isn’t paying early enough to justify the inconvenience, and supporters who think that it’s heartless for these retailers to commercialize the holiday.

Despite the coverage this issue has gotten, retailers keep opening earlier and earlier, to the point that Kmart will be open for 41 straight hours. Shortly after this marathon opening was announced, CNN had a story that read:

Hundreds of Kmart customers took to social media and threatened to boycott the store if it didn’t reverse its decision, so that its employees can spend Thanksgiving with their families. People called the decision “heartless,” “greedy,” “shameful” and “disgusting.”

There must be a reason that retailers would subject themselves to this type of negative publicity at a time of happiness and goodwill each year.

Read more

Happy Thanksgiving to All the Racist ‘Sexy Color’ People

Sexy Color Tanning SalonAs we have opined previously in this trusty blog, Christmas often overshadows fall and winter seasonal marketing efforts for the big box retailers. I suppose small businesses realize that same epiphany, which has to explain this breaking news alert in the world of #AdFail.

For that, we take you to Dothan, Ala. in an industry you didn’t think couldn’t get uglier…it did. Fake bakes.

Enjoy this ad, and the fun story from the greatness of Jezebel.com. As you can tell, the owners of Club Sun Color Studios have figured out an all-too-classy way to market during Thanksgiving.

This from their cornucopia of bigotry and idiocy…advertisement:

“Have a Colorful Thanksgiving! The Indians brought more than just ‘corn’ to the first Thanksgiving…they brought Sexy ‘Color’!”

You know, if NFL mascots and Portuguese explorers sticking a boot in their behind doesn’t offend Native Americans completely, this should do the trick. Oh look. The ad even comes trollop Pocahontas with fringed stilettos and some Puritan bimbo dressed like Betsy Ross, I suppose.

Nothing says “Thanksgiving” like a pleathered tan, Daniel Boone’s naughty dreams and mimicry of genocide. Pass the turkey, please.

The Pimping of All the Holidays is Right On ‘Target’

Let's just go from September to December on the calendar.

Let’s just go from September to December on the calendar.

Ah, yes. The sounds of the radio are changing. The people are beginning to wear more festive clothing. The decor in the stores are getting blinged out. Sales are showing.

And it’s not even Halloween yet, you nimrods! 

Brands in retail just can’t wait for the jolly fat man to get here, so they ostensibly ignore the Great Pumpkin and forget the Plump Turkey to make way.

Yes, it’s all for profit but these giant profiteers of Black Friday and Cyber Monday are becoming Ebenezers for their foreshadowing ways. Personally, my children enjoy both Halloween and Thanksgiving before the stockings go up.

And why? Because I don’t want to end up like Target did last year. (That, and I have a skosh of class.)

According to Jeff Jones, CMO at Target, the retailer “went too soon last year” when its Christmas shopping campaign began in mid-October, he told AdAge. This season, Mr. Jones said Target won’t launch its anthem holiday ad until the first week of November. To wit, I say, “It’s about time and thank you!

Early ads [featuring #MyKindOfHoliday] will also focus on Thanksgiving to a degree the retailer has not in the past. One TV spot shows a group of friends gathering around a turkey dinner, while another will promote the price per pound of turkey — a first for the retailer. Hell, it’s a first for any money-grubbing, bah-humbug, turkeys-are-only-good-for-stuffing-my-pockets retailer.

“We have never said Thanksgiving has a place at Target. It’s a big event, and we think we have a great value proposition when you think about being a one-stop shop [for] food, home and decorating,” Mr. Jones explained.

Makes sense to me. And by highlighting that pesky holiday in-between All Hallows Eve and Show Us the Money, it will make “cents” to Target. Mazel Tov, you know, as a certain Jewish carpenter might say.

A Brief and Terrible History of Black Friday

Black Friday We know, we know–we too plan to jump out of the nearest window if we have to hear the phrase “Black Friday” one more time. But as we scrolled through our news feed this morning we grew curious: what is the history of this horrible retail plague that empowers stores to sell lots of stuff by driving people up the wall with anxiety? And how did it come to haunt us so?

According to various trivia sites, the earliest roots of this sociological nightmare may lie with the very first Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, held on the Friday after Turkey Day in 1924. Wait, you mean the shameless commercialization of the holiday season began with…a shameless commercialization of the holiday season? Color us shocked!

Retailers weren’t satisfied with these blatant promotional extravaganzas. Why? Well, once upon a time, Thanksgiving always fell on the final Thursday of the month. That Thursday sometimes occurred during the fifth week of November, leaving stores with fewer days to promote their Christmas sales.

So what did they do? They corralled their lobbyists, who convinced then-President Franklin Roosevelt to move the official date up one week. The change was more controversial than you might expect; citizens protested, and the United States essentially celebrated two Thanksgivings until Congress passed a law right after what must have been a very frustrating Christmas in 1941, officially changing the date to the fourth Thursday in November.

By the time the 60′s rolled around, Black Friday had already turned into something approaching the freakout we know today, but the name doesn’t refer to that dark holiday cloud that arrives each year to herald impending doom.

Read more

Backlash Builds Against Retailers Starting Black Friday on Thanksgiving

Over the years, retailers have begun opening earlier and earlier on Black Friday in order to make the most of the biggest shopping day of the year. This bottom line-driven phenomenon is not-so-lovingly known as “Black Friday creep,” conjuring images of something amorphous and sinister rolling slowly through the night to overtake Thanksgiving — and that’s not too far off, really.

Just ask Casey St. Clair, a Target employee whose recent petition to get the retail giant to stay closed on Thanksgiving night (rather than opening with Black Friday deals at 9:00 pm as scheduled) inspired a veritable revolt among retail employees and customers alike.

Her email via Change.org read, in part:

In the last week, over 230,000 people have signed my petition asking my employer, Target, to change its Black Friday shopping hours to let employees have Thanksgiving dinner with our families.

We have real momentum, and this Monday, I’ll be delivering my petition with over 230,000 signatures to Target Headquarters – click here to join us and add your name.

After I was on TV, my manager offered me Thanksgiving day off. But I declined. This isn’t about just me — it’s about respecting one of the few days retail workers have a year to spend time with loved ones.

While Target is certainly not alone in opening on Thanksgiving (Toys “R” Us, Walmart, Sears and KMart will be the first large retail chains to open with Black Friday sales at 8:00 pm), it has received the brunt of the public’s ire thanks to the petition.

Read more

The Public’s Love/Hate Relationship with the Airline Industry

Now that the costly and intense presidential election is finally behind us, it’s time to focus on the next big thing in the lives of Americans: Thanksgiving.

After a heated election and a devastating hurricane, the public is weary, emotionally drained and ready to spend some quality time with the people we love. But before we can sit at the dinner table beside our crazy uncles and gaze upon that steaming turkey, millions of us will have to overcome one last obstacle:

The airline industry.

Just when you thought your flight couldn’t get any more expensive, dehumanizing and unreliable, we bring bad news: flights and airports will be even more packed than usual during the coming holiday season. We’re guessing you didn’t believe that could be true, but it is.

Here are the stats to prove it: the average flight in Thanksgiving 2011 was 82% full. In 2012 that number will increase to 90%, with the overall number of travelers 3% higher this year than last. In fact, Airlines for America reports that 24 million Americans will travel between November 16 and November 27. While the number of Americans flying has increased, the airlines themselves have slashed costs, reduced services and stopped running unprofitable routes. Supply and demand–you get it! Read more