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Posts Tagged ‘The New York Times’

This Is Why The Guest List For Your Next Event Is So Important


The Huffington Post tweaked The New York Times‘ Dealbook conference just a bit on the issue of diversity, pointing out that women and people of color were few and far between among the special guests.

“The theme of the conference, hosted by the paper’s finance and deal reporting site, was ‘Taking Stock of the Future: Rebuilding the Economy, Growth and Trust,’” writes the site. “Despite focusing on the future, the cast on stage looked a lot like the distant past.”

But actually, the story points out later, the conference beat big business stats:

The conference did manage to improve on corporate America’s standards of inclusion. Reuters reports that women account for 4 percent of CEOs at Fortune 500 companies, and a 2012 McKinsey study found that women make up only 14 percent of executive committees on corporate boards in the Fortune 500. The Center for American Progress found that a similarly tiny fraction of Fortune 500 CEOs, 4.2 percent, was made up of people of color.

The story demonstrates the importance of being thoughtful about the events you and your clients are hosting, making sure that any panels or VIP lists really reflect the audience in attendance, the industry and the population at large.

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Mediabistro Course

Mediabistro Job Fair

Mediabistro Job FairLand your next big gig! Join us on January 27 at the Altman Building in New York City for an incredible opportunity to meet with hiring managers from the top New York media companies, network with other professionals and industry leaders, and land your next job. Register now!

NYT PR Defends Decision to Publish the Name of Officer Darren Wilson’s Street

NYT Building

Journalists are supposed to be our storytellers, our soothsayers, our trusted cohorts who are all given carte blanche to walk into our homes or places of employment and give us — as one sage orator once opined — “just the facts, ma’am.” Yet, ethical concerns come into play every day.

This week, the conservative Washington Examiner asked the question: is it ethically acceptable to publish the name of the street on which the key figure in the world’s most controversial story recently bought a home?

Eileen Murphy, VP of corporate communications at the Times, answered “yes” and defended the paper’s decision to do so.

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The New York Times Experienced Premature Publication on Keystone XL

NYT BuildingThe New York Times just can’t catch a break.

The editors of the Old Grey Lady have serious sight problems, as noted with this unfortunate front page drama and this mistreated story. We aren’t sure if it’s the ghost of former executive editor Jill Abramson haunting the newsroom halls, but something is afoot. And much like one with no socks in a crusty pair of Toms, it stinks.

Enter into the fray the much-debated story about the Keystone XL pipeline. (For context, our fearless leader posted on the leak of Edelman’s “strategy” documents regarding a similar project from the same company, TransCanada).

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The New York Times Ignores Spell Check…Again

NYT building

Quick question: Anyone know any editors at The New York Times? Specifically, someone who works on the front page?

You see, we in the PRNewserverse are concerned about the paper nicknamed “The Old Grey Lady” because we believe the old broad has a serious case of glaucoma. Don’t get us wrong, we heart our journo friends at the Times and believe they’re some of the best reporters in the country. Their editors, though, aren’t doing them any favors recently.

Lately, the Times has been on a roll with a string of spelling kerfuffles, and its most recent issue is something most MS Word programs will flag with quickness. Pour a little liquor on the curb for that lady…

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Guy Fieri Restaurant Thriving Despite One of the Worst Reviews in History

guy fieriRemember that time The New York Times‘ Pete Wells went all the way off in a restaurant review of celebrity chef Guy Fieri‘s American Kitchen & Bar in Times Square?

“Did panic grip your soul as you stared into the whirling hypno wheel of the menu, where adjectives and nouns spin in a crazy vortex?” Wells asked, one of a lengthy series of over-the-top questions that made up the entirety of the article.

“Were you struck by how very far from awesome the Awesome Pretzel Chicken Tenders are?… Hey, did you try that blue drink, the one that glows like nuclear waste?” it continues. It is brutal poetry.

Despite the acerbic review, that restaurant is one of the top moneymakers in all of New York, proving that people on vacation really don’t care what they eat so long as they don’t have to do the dishes.

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The New York Times Makes Front Page News for the Wrong Reasons

Publishers have held countless recent brainstorm sessions in which they clutch a dry erase board and a glass of Scotch while trying to figure out how they can get subscribers back. Ideas on the accessibility front include more responsive design, exclusive member content, better UX, and a friendly suggestion that Mr. Gorbachev tear down that PAYWALL!

To its credit, The New York Times has been leading the industry with recent apps and different ideas to get readers’ attention. However, screwing up what should be “old hat” is not going to help.

Today’s story on the South Dakota Senate race begins in the middle of a thought. Maybe the “Grey Lady” is just getting too old to catch this sort of thing…

It’s all in the tweet from reporter David Gelles:

NYT Writer Creeped Out by Her PR Dossier

NYT NYT

Most PR people and the pitching services they use maintain profiles for prominent media contacts.

You can imagine how that might be a little weird for the other party, though, right? The vast majority of journalists aren’t celebrities, but accessing such a profile would be similar to a boy band member reading his own Teen Beat “interview.”

Natasha Singer, who covers business in various forms for The New York Times, wrote of encountering her own dossier this weekend.

It was awkward.

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Home Depot Data Breach Could Break Record Set by Target

Home Depot

Bad news for Home Depot as the company presumably prepares to issue some serious apologies: a recently reported credit card data breach could quickly surpass Target‘s nightmare to become the biggest in history.

From The New York Times this morning:

Over the last few days, thousands of fresh credit and debit card numbers have surfaced on so-called carding sites, which are websites where stolen credit card data is sold…So far, all roads point back to Home Depot. And if the evidence uncovered so far proves to be valid, the hack could top the record-setting breach of Target’s network last December.

It gets worse.

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Should Small Businesses Handle Their Own PR?

small biz

In a guest post last week, Sarah Rose reminded us that freshly launched startups don’t necessarily need PR assistance…yet.

A New York Times story from earlier this week makes the same point for small businesses, claiming that most of them don’t need third-party PR at all.

Robert J. Moore’s five points read like a promo primer of sorts…

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Tech Giants Can Handle Their Own Mergers and Acquisitions Now

google building

A New York Times piece published over the weekend reviewed the strategies employed by massive tech companies like Apple and Google when they want to acquire smaller companies — and there’s reason for both PR and the financial industries to be concerned.

It seems that the primary issue some executives consider when determining whether to buy certain other businesses is not their potential to make money in the short-term (or even the mid-term): it’s whether consumers will really use the products they create in everyday life.

Hence what they call “the toothbrush test”: how often will the average person use this company’s product? Will they use it a few times and get tired of it, or will it be a consistent presence in their lives?

The implication: an increasing number of tech execs think they can make these decisions on their own.

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