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Posts Tagged ‘Tumblr’

American Apparel Mistakes Challenger Explosion for Fireworks

AmericanApparel_Frank

The home of “smediums” and tasteless advertising should just reconsider talking to the public

While you were stumbling between the cooler full of adult beverages and your lawn chair, something pretty awful and all-the-more stupid happened — American Apparel posted a picture of the Space Shuttle Challenger exploding.

WHY?! It was placed (and long since deleted) on the corporate Tumblr account accompanied by the hashtags #smoke and #clouds because July 4 pictures are a thing. More about that decision after the jump…

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Is This Apple’s First Social Media Campaign?

Screen Shot 2014-03-04 at 10.47.36 AM

Social media is obviously not foreign to the Apple organization. iTunes, for example, has a strong Twitter presence with separate feeds for music, radio, movie trailers, etc.

It would seem, however, that the company turned to Tumblr for its first explicitly social campaign this week, using the Yahoo-owned network to promote the latest iPhone.

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Ben & Jerry’s Shows Us How to Use Instagram

Instagram is pushing hard on the business front this week: first the company distributed a hard copy “how to advertise” handbook for a select few brands, then it released this accompanying video for those of us scared by blocks of text printed on a page.

The follow-up was this extremely informal Ben & Jerry’s case study on the Instagram tumblr page.

The how-tos are broad to say the least: establish a theme tied to your brand, add related hashtags to your images, encourage followers to “submit” their own and then “become the curator of [your] brand story” by sharing your favorites. Here’s the most useful line:

“…many [followers] compose their shots using the framing techniques modeled by the brand. One favorite: a shot of a cone or cup from the POV of the person about to enjoy it, with a fun backdrop that identifies where they are.”

It’s quite simply, really—just show them how to do it and they will. We would tell you whether the book goes into a little more detail, but no one sent us a copy. : (

I’ll Take ‘How the Hell Do You Pronounce GIF?’ for $1000, Alex

Alex Trebek has obviously never searched for “Mean Girls” in Google images or visited the I Work in PR page.

Last night’s final Jeopardy question weighed in on the GIF pronunciation controversy, prompting responses from every resident of Geekville eager to resolve an argument that started one night in a Silicon Valley juice bar after a few too many shots of wheatgrass:

The answer, of course, was GIF, and the person in question was tumblr CEO David Karp. But is the debate over? Oh no.

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Google This: Yahoo Is Number One Among Search Engines

Yahoo-v-GoogleCheck your monitor. Reboot the computer. Pick it up and shake it like an Etch-a-Sketch. You read that headline correctly. According to comScore Media Metrix, online shopping — from back-to-school to coupon clipping — saw a considerable spike in Q2. Yeah for retailers, but the headline is yeah for…Yahoo? 

September marked the third month in a row that Yahoo claimed the first position, this time at 197,774 unique visitors to Yahoo sites from desktop devices. This is up from August at 196,432. I don’t know if it’s that flashy not-so-new logo or the CEO’s wannabe Maxim cover story, but there it is. Yahoo trumping the almighty Google.

Who woulda thunk it? In an interview with Forbes, that would be comScore VP of industry analysis Andrew Lipsman. 

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Here’s How Tech Journalists Choose Which Startups To Cover

Shutterstock: bringing stereotypes to life since 2003.

And now for a piece that every PR pro whose firm has ever represented a startup should read this weekend. Yesterday Jenna Wortham, tech reporter for The New York Times, wrote a cool interactive story speculating on which startups might blow up in coming months. Then, in what could only be seen as an act of charity to the tech PR world, she followed up with a post about how, exactly, she and journalists like her choose which startups to cover.

So what’s the secret? Let’s summarize:

Teens Haven’t Really Abandoned Facebook

Yes, your 13-year-old cousin is totally over Facebook. Yes, she wrote about that fact on Mashable. But that doesn’t mean that you should sell all the stock you bought last year. More importantly, it doesn’t mean that your clients should stop paying you to manage their pages.

Slate offers a counterpoint because that’s what they do, noting that, while none of the author’s friends are on Facebook, she supposedly fears getting in trouble for unflattering pictures that her older acquaintances post on their timelines. And seventh graders never imitate their elders.

For the two hundredth time, Facebook isn’t going anywhere. More than 40% of Americans still check it every single day. Mark Zuckerberg says that the site’s teen membership has held steady over the past couple of years; if you don’t believe him, the latest Pew Research study found that it’s still far and away the most popular social network, no matter how much Yahoo paid for Tumblr.

You already know how this story ends, but we’ll clarify. All this little bit of citizen journalism means is that Facebook is not, and never really was, the be-all-end-all of social media promotions—and you’ll need more than a timeline post to win the attention of the youngest generation.

That’s it. Moving along…

Tutors Spellcheck Graffiti in Unique tumblr Campaign

You know, we really don’t care whether this promo campaign qualifies as PR or marketing. It’s just really cool. The UK-based Arc firm (part of the Leo Burnett Group) came up with a unique way to promote online tutoring company The Tutor Crowd: create a tumblr page all about spellchecking London street graffiti! Here are some samples:

The idea is that parents will see the stickers around town and get the impression that The Tutor Crowd is a little hipper (and therefore more effective) than other educational services companies. There’s more on the page itself (warning: some of the language in the original tags is NSFW). We wish we’d come up with this one.

20 Brands with the World’s Most Loyal Facebook Fans

We think you’ll agree: research on the influence of Facebook brand pages is confusing (to say the least).

Following reports of “Facebook fatigue” and a news that members of the all-important Millennial demographic spend more time on Tumblr comes a study proclaiming that the same 18-29 set doesn’t find Facebook brand pages “credible” and tends to avoid or ignore even the ones they “like.”

What to make of it all? Well, this week also brings us a Louddoor study revealing the twenty brands with the “most loyal” Facebook fans. We thought we’d check out the top twenty pages and highlight posts demonstrating why their fans are so much more engaged. Here goes:

These pages may not have the most fans, but they do have the most engaged fans–because they’ve all catered to their audiences very successfully. What do we think?

PR Win: BMW Designs 4-Year-Old’s 19-Engine Dream Car

One look at the photo of the over-the-top vehicle at left, and you might think, “Whoa. Was that designed by a car-crazed kid, or something?” Why yes, yes it was – a four-year-old named Eli, to be precise.

The one-of-a-kind design features 19 engines, 42 wheels, three steering wheels (to be controlled by three different drivers simultaneously) and, of course, a large trunk dedicated solely to transporting toys.

So how did this epically equipped piece of machinery make it from the brain of a toddler to a detailed BMW design? Like so many other magical things in childhood, all it took was a kid’s limitless imagination–and a particularly cool, dedicated adult invested in encouraging that creativity–to get things moving. It all started when Eli’s uncle posted on car enthusiast website Jalopnik:

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