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Posts Tagged ‘Wendy’s’

One Way to Engage: Tell Followers Things About Themselves

Earlier this week we posted a study reinforcing the importance of engagement and noting that most brands will lose lots of new followers if they fail to do it properly.

On that note, we recently came across a good example of how to encourage followers to engage via Marketwired, GolinHarris and McDonald’s Canada. The key, in this case, is to move beyond sharing information about the brand itself and begin informing followers about their own behavior. Here’s the tweet in question:

This is a great piece of shareable behavioral data—and note the social media manager’s response to followers. While the numbers aren’t Ellen-worthy, it was more effective than a simple announcement of the #FreeCoffee promo.

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Presentation Writing: Design and Delivery

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The 5 Most Socially Engaged Restaurant Brands

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Today we stumbled across the Restaurant Social Media Index, a three-year-old research tool measuring the performance of various restaurant brands on social media.

We were first drawn to this list of names with the greatest audience engagement levels; we found it particularly relevant considering the fact that most of its entries are fast food chains and salty, fatty fare is always popular on Super Bowl weekend.

So we figured we’d explore the top five on the list of 25 and find some examples of this all-important “engagement.”

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Wendy’s Rebranding Focuses on Sleek Design and Social Engagement

Wendy's Perennial fast food underdog Wendy’s just announced a full rebranding–but unlike recent Arby’s and American Airlines campaigns, this one will involve more than a slick new logo and an interior makeover. It will include a new tagline, an expanded digital presence and a more aggressive attempt to engage customers.

In July, for example, the chain launched an “info to go” app designed to help diners gauge the nutritional value of their favorite items and make healthier choices. This isn’t an unprecedented move: McDonald’s has the same sort of app in addition to a new one called “Mouth Off” which allows users to sing through that weird talking fish thing in another attempt to push Fish McBites.

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Backlash Against Wendy’s, Taco Bell for Cutting Hours and Blaming Obamacare

Few things grab the public’s attention like a celebrity-backed boycott, protest, or backlash against a specific brand or company. Today, Wendy’s and Taco Bell find themselves on the wrong end of just this sort of upheaval.

Roughly 100 Wendy’s employees in the Omaha, Nebraska area will have their weekly schedules reduced to 28 hours a week so that they will no longer qualify for the health care benefits that “Obamacare” mandates for full-time employees. A Taco Bell in Guthrie, Oklahoma enacted a similar policy.

Even though these underhanded approaches seem unique to these specific franchises, the backlash against the Wendy’s and Taco Bell corporations has been swift. Celebrities like Castle star Nathan Fillion and comedian Sarah Silverman voiced their outrage via Twitter, and many people pledged to avoid not just those specific locations, but all restaurants owned by the chains in question.

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PR Challenge: Fast Food Workers Stage Mass Walk-Offs

Burger King Protest New York CityThe fast food industry can’t seem to catch a break these days.

Just kidding, those chains make billions of dollars a year—and most have seen their profits increase during the recession. But their employees are another story: they keep trying to unionize! What’s that all about?

Thursday saw a successful blunt-force trauma PR campaign waged by New York City fast food employees with the backing of churches, civil rights groups and labor unions–all united under the Fast Food Forward banner and the “can’t survive on $7.25″ tagline. The first group of workers walked off the job at a Manhattan McDonald’s at 6:30 in the morning, when supporters gathered with signs demanding higher pay and better benefits. More followed suit throughout the day.

The struggle to unionize has a long history in nearly every industry, but yesterday apparently marked the first time that so many have left work en masse at dozens of different restaurants in a coordinated effort to pressure employers.

Some basic facts: The average New York City fast food employee makes approximately $7.25/hour, earning only $11,000 per year. This total obviously doesn’t amount to a living wage in a city like New York—and organization is particularly challenging in an industry with such a high turnover rate. Some also claim that their employers do not offer sufficient sick days or health care benefits. Their collective demands include hourly wages in the range of $15, which would be a substantial increase.

From a distance, this looks like a textbook case of terrible PR.

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Fast-Food Consumers Too ‘Sophisticated’ For BK

Wendy’s is out-marketing Burger King and is now poised to take the second spot on the list of top U.S. burger chains, the Financial Times says.

Only this summer, Burger King made headlines for its decision to drop its creepy mascot. Since then, it has been focusing a lot more on the quality of its food. Along with dumping its mascot, Burger King split with its ad agency, Crispin Porter + Bogusky, which created that spokesperson along with other campaigns like “Flame,” cologne that smells like burgers. The FT says the split with CP+B could have something to do with BK’s fall from grace.

The other problem, the article says, is that Burger King’s food is kind of crappy.

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NYT Calls Out Ketchum for Giving WSJ Exclusive on New Wendy’s Marketing Campaign

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Breaking a news story with only one publication, often referred to as an “exclusive,” is common practice in the PR world. The upside is that you are pretty much guaranteed coverage in a publication, if you work out an agreement with a reporter. The downside is that you’re likely to annoy other reporters covering that beat who know you chose their competitor over them.

Case in point: Ketchum is handling PR for the launch of fast food chain Wendy’s new marketing campaign. It’s a pretty big story for advertising and marketing reporters. They chose to give the story exclusively to The Wall Street Journal, which as you can imagine, didn’t please other reporters, one of which went forward with the story anyway. Writes the TimesStuart Elliott:

Wendy’s declined to discuss the campaign because executives at the company and at the Ketchum unit of the Omnicom Group, the outside public relations agency for Wendy’s, arranged to give the story exclusively in advance to The Wall Street Journal.

Oof. Elliott gives a full recap on the Time‘s Media Decoder blog.