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Posts Tagged ‘YouTube’

Facebook and YouTube Remind Us What Happened in 2014

In the interest of years ending, new years beginning, and shared experiences, the two businesses that know us best (thanks, Big Data) have shared nostalgia for 2014 this week.

First, Facebook’s take: these are the things we kindly ALLOWED you to share.

This mystical “Facebook” is a bit more positive than the one we check every day, so maybe the video is part of a rebranding campaign.

Next, Google and YouTube offer their version of the year that was (which you’ve probably already seen because of course we’re a day behind on it).

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Mediabistro Course

Mediabistro Job Fair

Mediabistro Job FairLand your next big gig! Join us on January 27 at the Altman Building in New York City for an incredible opportunity to meet with hiring managers from the top New York media companies, network with other professionals and industry leaders, and land your next job. Register now!

YouTube Food and Lifestyle Personalities Share Branding Tips

YouTube Truvia Baking Contest Final“Mix, taste, frost, yum and done” – those were among the steps that a contestant used to bake brown sugar cupcakes. She was competing at an event this week to be a baking star sponsored by Truvia, a natural sweetener. Four YouTube food and lifestyle stars judged the desserts and offered insights on how they each rose to video fame.

While the baking techniques were straightforward, the path to becoming a YouTube sensation isn’t as clear cut. As moderator and YouTube beauty channel host Rachel Talbott noted, it takes time. As the judges concurred, it also takes resourcefulness and an ongoing, concerted effort to stand out from the crowd. The panelists included:

Byron Talbott: professionally trained chef, Byron Talbott channel
April Moore: online foodie, mom and lifestyle expert with 3 YouTube channels
Gaby Dalkin: cookbook author, food/lifestyle writer, What’s Gaby Cooking channel
Joanne Ozug: recipe developer behind Fifteen Spatulas channel

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YouTube Is Rethinking Its Tough Stance Against Indie Labels

youtube logoFor the longest time, YouTube was known as the place to go for grainy home videos of the funny, the incredible and the mundane. Now the site is an Internet staple. Big brands rely on it for their marketing efforts. Entertainment companies use it to introduce upcoming projects. Everyday people have stepped up their game, making it the place for not just low-budget clips but higher-production videos that have the capacity to go viral in a major way.

And now that MTV doesn’t really show videos anymore and fans haven’t made the shift to networks like Revolt and Fuse at a tremendous volume (that, of course, could change), YouTube has become a key online place for music videos. So it was a big blow to indie labels when they were faced what’s being called an “ultimatum” from YouTube.

“Indies were rankled most by what appeared to be an ultimatum by YouTube, with the company telling labels that they would remove advertisements on their music videos, the service’s principal revenue generator, if they refused the contract’s terms, cutting them off from a stream that generates hundreds of millions of dollars for labels each year,” reports The Hollywood Reporter.

When did YouTube turn into a grumpy old man?

The video site now seems to be changing its tune (according to Financial Timessub req’d), which is a good thing for its street cred.

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Brands Rush to Sign the Latest Social Media Stars as Ambassadors

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Hundreds of young people with a bit of time on their hands are now moving to turn their mastery of social media into legitimate careers with backing from big brands–and The New York Times is ON IT.

A couple of stories this weekend highlighted the ways in which these social artisans have begun turning their Vines and YouTubes into cold, hard cash–while helping some businesses stay relevant with core demos in the process.

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Tom Cruise Agrees: 2005 Was the Year Everything Changed for Entertainment PR

tom cruise tweetDo you remember the moment that everything changed in the world of entertainment PR? This LA Weekly story proposes it was the moment we started saying that Tom Cruise jumped on Oprah’s couch. The article makes the case that he didn’t do that, but the Internet made it so.

At that time, Tom Cruise had made some of the movies he’s most known for – The Color of MoneyRain Man, Top Gun, Born on the Fourth of July — and had been crowned the third Greatest Movie Star of All Time by Premiere magazine. That was also the point where Perez Hilton and other entertainment blogs were starting to make their mark. And the same month of Cruise’s appearance on Oprah, YouTube had been unleashed upon the world.

Up to this point, Cruise had been pretty conservative about speaking publicly outside of his film appearances. He also had a powerhouse publicist by his side, Pat Kingsley. Because she worked with a number of A-list stars and entertainment journalism was confined to the print pages of magazines like People, she was able to manage media coverage of her clients with a firm grip. If she wanted to shut something down, she could make a call and do it.

But the article points out the free-for-all that blogs and viral video made of celebrity media. Particularly because stars — not used to the round-the-clock brutal coverage — said and did things out in the open that they didn’t think would get out (or be of interest if it did).

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Can Mike Bloomberg Really Take on the NRA?

Former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg has a lot of money and he’s very passionate about gun control.

This is nothing new.

His advocacy group Everytown for Gun Safety is, however–and this week the group launched its first campaign:

It’s a powerful PSA, though the fact that comments on the YouTube clip have been disabled hints at the considerable communications challenges ahead.

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WATCH: Netflix Goes to Prom, Proves Being a ‘Third Wheel’ Can be Epic

Call me old fashioned, but there’s just something totally un-romantic about propositioning a potential prom date via Twitter. That is, unless you’re courting a major company, not a classmate.

Seventeen-year-old Muthana Sweis, a student at Marist High School in Chicago, sent out the following tweet in January:

Hey @netflix if this gets 1,000 retweets will you go to my junior prom with me?— Muthana Sweis (@muthanasweis) January 30, 2014

In an appropriately-gushing response, Netflix accepted, tweeting:

We said yes! We’re third wheeling to #Prom2014 with @muthanasweis and his date: https://t.co/0AQKYrljxj— Netflix US (@netflix) March 28, 2014

So how exactly does Netlix “third wheel” it to prom? Well, for one thing, by providing some serious wheels.

Sweis got to choose between a few different TV-themed rides, and ended up selecting a classic ’50s Buick from “Grease” and a chauffeur dressed as John Travolta’s character, Danny. Oh, and for good measure, he also got wear a James Bond-esque tux. Read more

#PRFail: Samsung’s Flammable Phone Response Backfires

Burned-Samsung-galaxy-s4Samsung, the world’s largest smartphone maker, has a hot deal for the holidays. Its Galaxy S4 is smartly designed, fast as can be and oh yeah, catches on fire while charging. While that last note isn’t something most desirable for the kiddos, Samsung finds itself in a particular crisis communications ballyhoo.

A YouTuber who blasts his selfie videos under the name of “Ghostlyrich” is the reason Samsung hates social media. Why? Because instead of addressing Samsung’s customer service department and fighting through that malevolent hold music of “The Carpenters Greatest Holiday Hits,” he does this for the world to see.

That, and NSFW lingo the cool kids use, after the jump…

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YouTube Spearheads ‘Clean Up the Comments’ Movement

trollololololoInternet comment threads: can’t live with ‘em, can’t kill ‘em…or can you?

If you work in digital marketing or PR then you’ve almost certainly had some experience scrolling through comment sections to answer poorly spelled, logically unsound criticisms of your client or firm. And if you read our sister blog AgencySpy every week then you may well be one of those commentors who spends his or her lunch hour assuming fake screen names to talk smack about rivals’ work. (You can’t see it, but we’re wagging our finger at you right now.)

To those who hate comments as much as the rest of us, YouTube might be something of a savior: starting this week, the king of free videos will attempt to weed out the worst of the trolls by requiring that all commentors first sign up for Google+ accounts. How will this help anyone?

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Abercrombie & Fitch Knows What the Fox Says

Nothing says desperation like grabbing the latest, most annoying YouTube sensation and holding on for dear life (not that it’s much of a workout with abs like these).

Well, that was…bizarre. Now that everyone hates Abercrombie & Fitch due to its stated bias against non-models and hijabs, we suppose that providing cheap grist for the clickbait mill is one way to get attention.

Let’ hope it’s not enough, because A&F is quickly running out of people to offend and we’ve taken more than our share of schadenfreude from the decline and fall of Mike Jeffries’ soft-core empire.

Sorry for making you sit through that one.

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